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Comment May be for troubleshooting, but alternatives exist (Score 5, Informative) 203 203

Hello,

It will be somewhat useful for troubleshooting, but Windows 7 has had the Problem Steps Recorder (filename: PSR.EXE) for years now, and Microsoft has offered a screen recording tool since at least 2009 for download via TechNet.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

Comment My current home PC (security researcher) (Score 1) 558 558

Hello,

System specifications are as follows:

Chassis and Power Supply
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 Black Pearl w/ USB 3.0 ATX Mid Tower Silent PC Computer Case
Power: Corsair RM750 CP-9020055-WW 750 Watt ATX PS
Accessory: Antec Easy SATA Hot Swap Hard Drive Caddy with eSATA Port

Storage
Optical: Asus BW-12B1ST Blu-Ray R/W SATA
Storage (SSD): 2 x Samsung 840 Pro Series MZ-7PD256 256GB SATA 6Gb/s 2.5" SSD
Storage (HHD): Western Digital WDBSLA0040HNC-NRSN Desktop Performance 4TB SATA 6Gb/s HDD
Storage (USB): Seagate Backup Plus Fast Portable Drive 4TB USB 3.0

Compute, Graphics and Audio
Motherboard: ASUS P9X79 PRO LGA 2011 Intel X79 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard with USB BIOS
CPU: Intel i7-4820K LGA 2011 64 Technology Extended Memory CPU Processors BX80633I74820K
Cooling: Intel Thermal Solution Air
RAM: 32GB - 2 x Patriot Viper 32GB (4Ã--8) Kit DDR3 PC3-12800 1600MHz PD000282-PV332G160C0QK
Sound Card:: Creative Labs X-Fi Fatality Titanium Sound Blaster PCIe adapter card
Video Card:: EVGA GeForce GTX660 SC 2GB GDDR5 PCIe 2.0 SVGA Card

Peripherals
Monitor: Auria EQ276W 27" WQHD LED LCD Display
Keyboard Rosewill Mechanical Keyboard RK-9000V2
Mouse:: Microsoft Trackball Optical USB mouse

System is used for a variety of professional and personal activities

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

Comment Is MojoKid shilling for HotHardware allowed by /. (Score 5, Interesting) 72 72

Hello,

If one looks at MojoKid's submissions to Slashdot, one notes they exist exclusively of links to articles at HotHardware.Com, which according to the whois data, is registered to a Dave Altavilla of Mendon, MA.

Never to ActiveWin, Ars Technica, HardOCP, Neowin, TechReport, WinBeta or the scores of other web sites which discuss, review or "engage in coordinate PR disclosure" of technology news, but always to HotHardware, never anywhere else.

Are MojoKid and Mr. Altavilla the same person? And why is he (are they?) only posting links to Slashdot to HotHardware,a site which, coincidentally, seems to rely on links to partner.googleadservices.com, www.google-analytics.com/, cdn.taboola.com, tru.am and other advertising and privacy-invasive sites in order to monetize its page views. All these hostnames should be blocked in your hosts file before visiting any links to hothardware.com to ensure you are not being advertised to or tracked (which seem to be very similar, these days).

If MojoKid/Altavilla are going to use Slashdot to generate revenue for themselves, they should at least let Slashdot's management know and note in their submissions that they are sending Slashdotters to a site which they generate revenue from; to not do so is unethical and abusive of Slashdot.

And in case anyone wants to throw a stone at my glass house, I've submitted a grand total of one articles to Slashdot, and it mentioned a free service being offered through the auspices of the IEEE which not just my employer but dozens of our competitors were involved in. Not a single banner ad or privacy-invasive script to be had there at all.

Regards.

Aryeh Goretsky

Comment Not a bad teaching tool (Score 3, Insightful) 68 68

Hello,

This actually isn't a bad idea... as a training tool. It exposes GHCQ's interns (or other programmers and IT pros) who are not used to programming or managing clusters with the underlying concepts, so they can then go and apply those to whatever real projects they have.

Not everyone gets exposure to distributed computing concepts as part of their education, and having a small, simple system like this is a good and inexpensive means of introducing them to new hires. The homebrew cluster management software is another example of this.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

Comment Re:Where can I buy a good trackball? (Score 2) 431 431

Hello,

A couple of "large" trackball vendors:

BigTrack - http://www.bigtrack.co.uk/
Kensington - http://www.kensington.com/us/u...

You can also try visiting www.trackballworld.com and looking around at the various offerings there. I've never bought from them, so no specific feedback to give (or, in other words, caveat emptor).

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

Comment Probably makes little difference (Score 1) 1 1

Hello,

I suspect it will make little difference. A sophisticated terrorist could probably allow for enough room inside a laptop for a Raspberry Pi, Gumstix or similar computer module to display a convincing BIOS/UEFI boot-up message, possibly followed some kind of shut-down error due to low battery or corrupt file system. I would seriously doubt if a TSA agent would know the difference between that and, say, a legitimate boot screen for every Linux distro out there.

Frankly, I'm not sure what the advantage is to this kind of screening. After all, the January 2011 bombing at Moscow's Domodedovo airport demonstrates how effective a suisidce bombing can be inside an airport. I would imagine that a bombing at crowded TSA chokepoints would be the exact kind of target terrorists are looking for.

I would imagine that when a bomb goes off, the entire airport goes into lockdown and all of the incoming planes are redirected to alternate airports. Repeat that bombing once or twice more on the same day and you have likely paralyzed that nation's airspace and related infrastructure for several days while they try to and figure out how to respond.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

Comment Re:Read here for a more detailed perspective (Score 1) 97 97

Hello,

The first public analysis of the malware campaign (called BlackEnergy by most researchers) was done by Arbor Networks back in October 2007, and Dell SecureWorks did a comprehensive write-up on its second generation in 2010. Additional information on this malware campaign:

Hope this is information is useful to anyone who might be concerned they have compromised hosts on their network.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

Comment Sad... this was largely addressed in Windows 8 (Score 1) 577 577

Hello,

What NetworkWorld freelancer Andy Patrizio complains about, cruft or OS decay, in the RTFA was largely addressed by Microsoft in Windows 8.

Microsoft worked in depth with silicon developers (i.e., the folks who make chips/chipsets for various things that require drivers like motherboards, videocards, network adapters and so forth) as well as software developers that used drivers (anti-malware, encryption, backup and so forth) to ensure not just that installation and removal went smoothly, but that performance was within acceptable levels, which in particular had been a problem for some of the bloatier anti-malware programs often seen pre-loaded onto consumer-targeted PCs, not just during startup and shutdown, but also during common day-to-day activities.

Since Mr. Patrizio didn't bother to use Windows 8 for any length of time, though, he didn't find out about the performance improvements, which, I suppose, is why we are commenting on his rather sad polemic.

Regards

Aryeh Goretsky

Comment Re:I know! (Score 2) 545 545

Hello,

Driver support, which was mature under XP because of its longevity, took a hit when Microsoft released new models for Vista and was late in delivering its DDK. On the other hand, driver support in Windows 7 and up have been pretty mature. In the case of Windows 8 to 8.1, my employer was able to get away with little to minimal updates of our software, which uses filter drivers, for compatibility with the new version of the operating system. The level of compatibility had previously been rare in Windows for us.

As far as hardware goes, the difference between specifications for Windows Vista, 7, 8 and 8.1 has been pretty small. A 1 GHz CPU, 1GB RAM and some disk space were the basic minimum requirements for each, if memory serves. Don't expect it to run great on that kind of systems for all uses, though, but it will run.

And, yes, a new version of Windows usually means new features, both in terms of hardware and software. So, it's not a bad idea to try and time your hardware upgrade cycles to coincide with Windows releases if you want the latest shiny bits, which, as you noted, third-party devs are developing for.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

Comment Re:That'll teach them (Score 1) 50 50

Hello,

It's such a slight slap on the wrist that I doubt Verizon even felt it.

According to Wikipedia, Verizon made $120.55B in profits last year. That's a little over $330M a day.

Or about, $13.8M an hour.

So, a $7.4M fine means they paid the equivalent of 32.4 minutes of profit.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

Comment Re:How much? (Score 2, Interesting) 149 149

Hello,

Dell didn't pay anything for it, as far as I can tell.

This is a post by MojoKid, who operates the HotHardware.Com site. I'm guessing he submitted the article to Slashdot in order to get some ad revenue from people visiting his site as a result.

I'm guessing that blocking

googletagservices.com
googleusercontent.com
tru.am

before visiting his site will make that a little more difficult.

I do not know if he is a Slashdot or a Dice Holdings, Inc., employee, but it would be nice if there was some sort of transparency statement, if that's the case.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

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