Please create an account to participate in the Slashdot moderation system

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Slashdot videos: Now with more Slashdot!

  • View

  • Discuss

  • Share

We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

×

Comment: Re:Oh, please. (Score 1) 599

by Archangel_Azazel (#49136095) Attached to: Republicans Back Down, FCC To Enforce Net Neutrality Rules

As far as the ACA goes, this is what I've seen :

Republicans put in the individual mandate as a handout to the insurance companies. (C'mon, you're going to seriously try to convince me that MANDATING that folks have healthcare, in effect giving insurance companies TONS of new customers isn't a handout?)
Republicans then campaigned against the mandate, because....reasons.
Republicans drag their feet, Republican states refuse to implement the plan, Republican states refuse to expand Medicaid.

Granted, Democrats have had their share of bullshit doings as well, but seriously... The Republican bullshit-fest, hand wringing, wailing and FUD are at *epic* levels. Never in my life have I seen so many ill-educated people argue against getting fucked over by corporations before. It's a demonstration of the power of advertising....especially FALSE advertising.

Comment: Re:Too CPU hungry (Score 1) 188

by afidel (#49131281) Attached to: Google Now Automatically Converts Flash Ads To HTML5

Most rendering engines aren't single threaded, and most browsers use GPU acceleration. However, on mobile adding a bunch of animations will surely lower battery life, so I just switched from Chrome to Firefox on my Android device as animated and sound filled ads are evil and Chrome mobile lacks extension support.

Comment: Re:So Cal Edison Reduces Local Headcount w/ Tata, (Score 1) 176

by afidel (#49127469) Attached to: H-1B Visas Proving Lucrative For Engineers, Dev Leads

Reimage monkeys were never valuable, they were a necessary evil that companies tolerated while they had to. If you didn't drive your skills up the value chain then you either lack the ability to or you lack ambition, neither of which generally leads to a lucrative career path. Heck, when VMWare and other vendors try to sell me expensive management tools to save me time I laugh because my team spends probably only 15-20% of our time doing management of the infrastructure, the rest is spent working on projects that bring value to the business.

Comment: Re:Best money Tom Steyer ever spent (Score 0) 434

by Archangel_Azazel (#49123457) Attached to: Obama Vetoes Keystone XL Pipeline Bill

You know, for being so pro-big-government, the size of that government sure has been shrinking, eh? I'm guessing that by this logic, he's also really anti-gun...*ahem*.

Republicans and their Big Business overlords want smaller government for the same reason crooks want less police. It makes their lives easier. The Tea party is funded by the Koch bros, bankrolled practically from day one. If my contact with them is to be believed, they are ignorant and quite proud of that fact. Just look at all the climate change deniers hanging on to them, along with the hyper-religious anti-gay movement. Not prejudiced? Perhaps not on paper so to speak, but dude...it's not like you have to go very far to hear one of them waxing on about "legitimate rape" or some other such drivel. I have no love for that bunch of morons. They are what happens when you live in states that fund more prisons than schools.

Comment: Re:Turns out agencies don't really work like that (Score 1) 145

by afidel (#49119425) Attached to: Attention, Rockstar Developers: Get a Talent Agent

The talent agencies are desperate for growth, they've already massively consolidated and recently started buying the sports management companies, so I'm sure if they think they can make money off the arrangement they'll try. The problem for programmers is that even really, really good ones only make 2-3x the league minimum for the major sports leagues so agents might not want to deal with the work for their 10% cut.

Comment: Re:Well maybe future improvements (Score 1) 279

by afidel (#49117613) Attached to: Intel Moving Forward With 10nm, Will Switch Away From Silicon For 7nm

GaAs chips have a very high thermal tolerance, temperatures of 250C have been shown to have no impact on MTTF, this is ~250% better than Si. The bigger issue is what do you attach them to, most commonly available PCBs can't handle that, though solutions do exist since I've read about very high temperature GaAs chips used in jet engine monitoring and control.

Comment: Re:Resource wars (Score 1) 279

by afidel (#49117571) Attached to: Intel Moving Forward With 10nm, Will Switch Away From Silicon For 7nm

Doubtful, Ga isn't that rare, we mine ~254t per year mostly as a byproduct of Al smelting, this is fairly small compared to ~54,000t for Si use in semiconductors, but is quite high given the fairly small market for it today. To give you an idea Lithium is slightly less common in the crust but annual production is ~30,000t.

Comment: Re:This is the End, Beautiful Friend, the End. (Score 1) 279

by afidel (#49117515) Attached to: Intel Moving Forward With 10nm, Will Switch Away From Silicon For 7nm

It's definitely slowing down, Westmere EX was 2.6B in early 2011, Haswell EP 5.69B in late 2014 so roughly 42 months to double (Haswell die is ~20% bigger accounting for the 220% count instead of 200%) . A large part of that slowdown though might be economics, Westmere was surely started before the financial crisis and Haswell likely during or after so Intel might have slowed development (especially since on these large parts they don't have any meaningful competition except at the very high end from IBM and Oracle)

Comment: Re:Of course (Score 4, Informative) 27

by afidel (#49097113) Attached to: Rapid Test For Ebola Now Available

Yeah, or maybe it's because this outbreak killed more people than all previous outbreaks combined. For example this report from 2003 lists 128 total deaths in a remote area of the Congo, at the peak of this outbreak there were more people than that dying per day in Sierra Leone. It's pretty understandable that you don't spend billions on research and development for a drug that might be used on 40 people per year on average but would on a drug that can stop a global pandemic.

Build a system that even a fool can use and only a fool will want to use it.

Working...