Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Ridiculous (Score 1) 54

by drinkypoo (#47581217) Attached to: The CIA Does Las Vegas

But when they're owned by 5 media companies, all of which are in turn owned by rich media barons, they tend to walk the party line.

We got there because of decades of people systematically giving their money to the most sensational press, which enabled them to become more powerful. It's not something that just happened.

I think that there probably oughta be a law that you can't knowingly tell an outright lie and call it news, but even that seems to be a minority view, which is just another symptom of the same damned need for entertainment.

Comment: Ridiculous (Score 3, Insightful) 54

by drinkypoo (#47580601) Attached to: The CIA Does Las Vegas

Journalists like Conor Friedersdorf have suggested that one explanation for this is that the public is "informed by a press

Balderdash. There is not a press. What is this, communism, comrade? We have many presses. The problem is that the public follows the sensational ones instead of the informative. We The People have the government, and thus the press, which we deserve.

Comment: Re:Have you actually been to China? (Score 1) 105

by drinkypoo (#47580587) Attached to: Chinese Government Probes Microsoft For Breaches of Monopoly Law

You didnt just say China had these elements you, very stupidly, supported the claim that China's economy is based on slave labour.

But it in fact is; it's not all obvious. Being forced to work is slavery even if you get paid, because you're not choosing the terms of your employment. It's like being raped and then having your rapist throw you a few currency units.

Comment: Re:VMS is dead; long live WNT (Score 1) 121

by hey! (#47579519) Attached to: HP Gives OpenVMS New Life and Path To X86 Port

Implementation makes a difference. Early versions of NT were quite good, but unpopular because you needed 16MB of RAM (if I recall correctly) to run them in an era when a high end personal computer shipped with 4MB of RAM. Over the years they tried to hold the line, at one point getting the minimum down to 12MB of RAM, but perhaps not coincidentally stability got really bad.

Comment: Re:von Braun didn't take his place (Score 1) 134

by hey! (#47579467) Attached to: Was America's Top Rocketeer a Communist Spy? The FBI Thought So

Yes, he designed stuff for our enemy, but if I had lived in the civil war times I might have built something like the CSS submarine Hunley.

With slave labor, no less.

Yes people are limited by their culture and time, but not *that* limited. Braun deserves condemnation for using slave labor in WW2.

Comment: Re:And no one will go to jail (Score 4, Insightful) 241

The way I see it, if they don't go for prosecution, they've more or less given these agencies carte blanche to violate the law, lie about it, and have no consequences.

Welcome to the American legal system, where selective prosecution is standard operating procedure. The only reason to have a legal system which does not require prosecution for known crimes is to permit treating some people differently than others. It leads to the proliferation of bad laws.

Privacy

UK Government Report Recommends Ending Online Anonymity 249

Posted by timothy
from the but-you-have-a-right-to-be-forgotten dept.
An anonymous reader writes with a bit of pith from TechDirt: Every so often, people who don't really understand the importance of anonymity or how it enables free speech (especially among marginalized people), think they have a brilliant idea: "just end real anonymity online." They don't seem to understand just how shortsighted such an idea is. It's one that stems from the privilege of being in power. And who knows that particular privilege better than members of the House of Lords in the UK — a group that is more or less defined by excess privilege? The Communications Committee of the House of Lords has now issued a report concerning "social media and criminal offenses" in which they basically recommend scrapping anonymity online.

Comment: Re:staunchy (Score 1) 194

by handy_vandal (#47576365) Attached to: Vint Cerf on Why Programmers Don't Join the ACM

I was thinking that "staunchy" is a good word for "tending to staunch" -- for example, a bandage is staunchy when it staunches a wound.

But I was mistaking "staunch" for "stanch" -- ones stanches (not staunches) a wound.

So then I think, "staunchy", from "staunch" -- thus "tending to be loyal or devoted".

Now I find out that "staunchy" means "stinky".

Which kind of fits both ways ... bloody wounds are stinky ... tendencies to loyalty are stinky (by comparison with real, true, full loyalty, as opposed to mere tendencies) ... it all fits together.

Comment: Re:Have you actually been to China? (Score 1) 105

by drinkypoo (#47575337) Attached to: Chinese Government Probes Microsoft For Breaches of Monopoly Law

You do realise the US does exactly this as well, and the prisons are corporations, and America even has more prisoners.

And? I didn't say the US didn't have any of these elements. I said that China did.

Posting ac as I spent all my mod points before reading this complete rubbish.

I note you didn't actually disagree with me. Obviously it isn't complete rubbish.

Comment: Re:So China is going to do (Score 1) 105

by drinkypoo (#47574349) Attached to: Chinese Government Probes Microsoft For Breaches of Monopoly Law

So, non-free dependencies? Not on my watch!

The specifications for the required ammunition are well-known. The stuff is harder to make than the firearm, however. For that to differ you'll have to use something substantially higher- or lower-tech, e.g. caseless or black powder. And caseless ammo is only easier to produce if you disregard the difficulty of producing a practical propellant.

Comment: Re:Have you actually been to China? (Score 0) 105

by drinkypoo (#47573739) Attached to: Chinese Government Probes Microsoft For Breaches of Monopoly Law

Slave labor? 'Fraid not.

The Chinese government itself literally operates labor camps where criminals are forced to produce consumer goods.

Your argument would be more credible

You clearly do not decide who is credible when you say that slave labor is not slave labor.

The universe seems neither benign nor hostile, merely indifferent. -- Sagan

Working...