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IBM

IBM Opens New Cloud Computing Laboratory 66

Posted by samzenpus
from the head-in-the-clouds dept.
Rob writes "InfoGrok is reporting that IBM is in the process of opening a new cloud computing laboratory, based out of Singapore. The new lab's primary aim is to help business, government, and research institutions to design, adopt, and reap benefits of cloud technologies. The lab will help IBM's clients deploy first-of-a-kind solutions that increase business responsiveness and performance."
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IBM Opens New Cloud Computing Laboratory

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  • Singapore (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Jurily (900488) <jurily@NETBSDgmail.com minus bsd> on Wednesday May 05, 2010 @10:56PM (#32107474)

    All the other words in the summary are buzzwords.

  • And? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by LS (57954) on Wednesday May 05, 2010 @10:57PM (#32107486) Homepage

    Is anyone else here thinking: so what? Sounds like a press release with almost nothing of interest.

  • cue the naysayers (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday May 05, 2010 @11:27PM (#32107660)

    Seems there's a pattern. Internet starts becoming popular: "That's nothing we can't do with our 9600 baud modems..." Facebook becomes popular: "That's nothing we can't do with email..." GUI's become popular, "That's nothing we can't do with a csh prompt..." javascript and flash become popular: "That's nothing we can't do with html..." Windows becomes popular, "That's nothing we can't do on our Sun workstations". The naysayers dissing something is a surefire sign it'll be huge in 5 or 10 years.

    Same now with cloud computing. Enough slashdotters dissing it makes me want to invest in it, because if there's one constant, it's that opinion here is a polar opposite of the public at large. Slashdot: "It means nothing!" --> it'll be the next big thing.

    There are always people who want things to remain as they always were, so they don't have to ever change or adapt to new things. But time moves on regardless.

  • by biryokumaru (822262) <biryokumaru@gmail.com> on Wednesday May 05, 2010 @11:43PM (#32107776)

    There are always people who want things to remain as they always were, so they don't have to ever change or adapt to new things. But time moves on regardless.

    When things change, they don't always get better. For things to get better, they always have to change.

  • by Whuffo (1043790) on Thursday May 06, 2010 @12:35AM (#32108044) Homepage Journal
    Thanks for that but I get all the ads I want from Television.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 06, 2010 @01:48AM (#32108400)

    Correct and in that sense, you haven't reduced administrative overhead but it has just increased because now your IT department will have to strategically plan an infrastructure build out. Not only will they have to deal with building out the infrastructure for the bare metal, but also the ever scaling "cloud" portion. You'll have to think large scale. How will they manage thousands of hosts that serve up a couple thousand on top of that, what will the network look like? How about your storage? DHCP, DNS? Will you be leveraging a directory? I only see private clouds being of interest to those companies that don't want another organization handling their data. Don't get me wrong, I like the idea of a private cloud and have been experimenting with open solutions because it makes me think about "how would I do this on a large scale?", it's a ton of work.

  • by dAzED1 (33635) <brianlamere&yahoo,com> on Thursday May 06, 2010 @03:59AM (#32108908) Homepage Journal

    The paradigm shift occured at least half a century ago when computers moved from single user purpose built machines to general purpose time share machines where resources were rented to users.

    Prior to 50 years ago, computers were only for personal use?

    Listen, I know it's fun to be contrary, but you didn't respond to what I actually wrote at all. It's not a paradigm shift because we're sharing resources, it's a shift because the machines themselves no longer matter. I am still having to remind people constantly that monitoring systems is nearly useless, at this point - one monitors services and response time of the services, with little regard to the hosts those services are running on. The shift was in how applications bounce from one physical machine to another - and no matter how much you want to pretend that everyone had personal computers in the 50s and then BOOM, mainframes came after PCs, you're just bloody wrong. For once in your life, don't be contrary just for the sake of being contrary. It's a completely different set of problems and solutions, due to being a different environment - and the fact that you don't agree strongly indicates that you've merely not done much with it yourself.

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