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Comment Re:Mixed Metaphors (Score 1) 143

The Gendarme isn't going to break down your door and drag you to jail.

While it's true poverty in the modern USA is better than poverty back then, it's still not pleasant.

The implication I jabbed at is that most Uber drivers had plenty of immediate alternative and better income methods. It struck me as flippant and naive.

Comment Re:First world (Score 1) 39

The US economy actually depends on innovation similar to how the Middle East economies depend on oil. We are innovation addicts.

It's a myth that innovation itself is needed to stimulate consumption. There are plenty of existing things people already want, if they simply had the money.

But, anything that becomes a commodity to manufacture or manage gets shipped to cheap 3rd-world manufacturers (C3WM) where labor is cheaper. To maintain the USA's higher cost of living, we have to push the envelope to create new devices and markets that are too cutting edge to be commoditized (yet).

For example, when personal computers were new, they were mostly made in the USA. As they became more of a commodity, their production shifted overseas. Jobs himself used to assemble Apple computers in his garage.

Apple similarly knows they have to push the envelope to avoid being bowled over by C3WM who can throw labor at the problem. The expense and complexity of wireless earphones may seem like overkill now, but if they make Apple products slightly more convenient than the others, they have a sales and marketing edge over the C3WM that allows them to charge a premium.

Eventually the C3WM will catch up in wireless earphones and every phone will support them, and Apple will have to move on to the next Next Big Thing (which is probably already in their lab).

Thus, it's not just a "first world problem", but a first world survival technique (if you want to survive as a first-worlder).

Comment Re:Being pedantic (Score 1) 301

... the felonious taking of the property of another from his or her person or in his or her immediate presence, against his or her will, by violence or intimidation.

What Alphabet did is by definition Robbery.

If they'd given, or promised, a Christmas Bonus, then yes it would be robbery.

If the (or their predecessors) had led the workers to expect bonuses only by voluntarily giving them in the past, but had never written contract terms or otherwise promised the bonuses for this year, then the hypothetical missing bonus was never the property of the workers in the first place.

Comment Re:'"We are looking into the matter" (Score 1) 83

Hell they probably would have accepted the offer for a free pen test. Instead many orgs react rather violently if they dont know about it and you did it.

An unexpected, unauthorized, "free pen test" is indistinguishable from a bad-guy cracking attempt, and must be treated as if it's a real threat. This causes ENORMOUS extra costs as the victim has to batten the hatches, examine everything for corruption and/or possible persistent threat instalation, compare working databases to backups and examine the differences vs. update audit trails, and so on.

Not to mention the concern that it might be a real attempt by the DHS, or a rogue group within it, to hack the election.

Comment Re:Being pedantic (Score 1) 301

If your company removes money from you and gives it to someone else, that is called Robbery.

But if the company just doesn't give you a Christmas/End-of-Year gift that they had been voluntarily giving previously, it may be a disappointment but it isn't Robbery.

= = = =

It may also be really stupid move on the company's part, though. It's going to cost them a bunch in employee satisfaction, and thus performance, over the next year or more.

Of course, if they were thinking of replacing a bunch of the employees with H1Bs or the like, tweaking them off so they perform poorly could then be used in claims that they were not good performers and thus needed replacing.

Comment Snoop Doggy Dog (Score 5, Interesting) 83

In an online political discussion, one conservative complained about Obama's alleged excess snooping. I pointed out that Bush and Trump are pretty much pro-snoopers also.

At first (s)he seemed to argue otherwise, but after a lot of probing on my part, the truth finally came out: He was more nervous with a Democrat snooping than a Republican. It wasn't the snooping itself, but WHO was snooping.

I can see how the personal trust issue can play a part, but to keep switching the laws back and forth depending on which party is in power is not realistic.

Comment Penis Cops [Re:Hillary Lost Because of Her] (Score 1) 402

and that 3-year-olds should be able to create their own genders.

Why would you want gov't regulating genders? I thought you people didn't like gov't intervention?

Trump hasn't indicated any mandate to regulate such anyhow.

where people don't buy into the idea that all white people are evil racists...

Filtering immigrants based on religion is just on such a track in my book, along with other rude comments Mr. T has made without apologies. For some odd reason, many conservatives don't see it that way, and that concerns me.

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