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Submission + - Facebook Launches "Home" for Android (slashdot.org)

Nerval's Lobster writes: Facebook has announced “Home” for Android smartphones (and, eventually, tablets). It’s something less than a full Facebook mobile operating system, as some expected before the company’s presentation, and more like an app update. Facebook also announced the Facebook Home Program, which will work with several carriers and device makers to pre-load Home onto select devices, including ones built by Samsung, Sony, ZTE, and Lenovo. The first “Home” phone will be the HTC First, a $99.99 phone that will ship April 12 from AT&T. Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg told analysts and journalists assembled for his presentation that Home was designed to reorient the phone and the Facebook mobile experience around people, not apps: “On one level, Home is the next mobile version of Facebook. On the other, it’s a change in the relationship with the next generation of computing devices.” Home essentially is a custom start screen for your Android phone, replacing the home screen with one centered on Facebook. While users can access other Android apps on the phone, the focus is on those apps that run on the Facebook platform. Home can also be enabled as a lock screen.

Submission + - NVIDIA Open-Sources 3D Driver For Tegra SoCs (phoronix.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Linux developers are now working on open-source 3D support for NVIDIA's Tegra in cooperation with NVIDIA and months after the company published open-source 2D driver code. There are early patches for the Linux kernel along with a Gallium3D driver. The Tegra Gallium3D driver isn't too far along yet but is enough to run Wayland with Weston.
Games

Submission + - History in Video Games - A Closer Look (criticalgamer.co.uk)

scruffybr writes: Whether it’s World War 2, the American Wild West or ancient Greece, history has long provided a rich source of video game narrative. Historical fact has been painstakingly preserved in some games, yet distorted beyond all recognition in others. Whereas one game may be praised for its depiction of history, others have been lambasted for opening fresh wounds or glorifying tragic events of our near past. Games have utilized historical narrative extensively, but to what extent does the platform take liberties with, and perhaps misuse it?

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