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Submission Summary: 0 pending, 289 declined, 69 accepted (358 total, 19.27% accepted)

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Submission + - EU Announces Censorship of US Sites (engadget.com)

walterbyrd writes: A review conducted by EU Justice Commissioner Vera Jourova found that Facebook, Twitter, Google and Microsoft failed to flag and remove offensive content within 24 hours, with less than half of cases being responded to in that timeframe. If they don't improve their response times, new legislation could be introduced to force them to do so.

Submission + - Ken Ham: We Shouldn't Waste Money Studying Science (patheos.com)

walterbyrd writes: Creationist Ken Ham, whose Noah’s Ark theme park has a price tag of $102 million, went on a Twitter rant this morning to argue that we need to stop funding the study of evolution and alien life because that money “could be used to benefit the human population in so many ways.”

Submission + - Face electrodes let you taste and chew in virtual reality (newscientist.com)

walterbyrd writes: Experiments with “virtual food” use electronics to emulate the taste and feel of the real thing, even when there’s nothing in your mouth. This tech could add new sensory inputs to virtual reality or augment real-world dining experiences, especially for people with restricted diets or health issues that affect their ability to eat.

Submission + - Filmmaker Arrested At Pipeline Protest Facing 45 Years In Felony Charges (huffingtonpost.com)

walterbyrd writes: The lengths that the oil industry, and their puppet politicians, will go to suppress information is amazing. 45 years is way more than most people get for murder.

Deia Schlosberg, the producer of the upcoming documentary “How to Let Go of the World and Love All Things Climate Can’t Change,” was detained while filming a protest against TransCanada’s Keystone Pipeline in Walhalla, North Dakota. Activists at the event, associated with the group Climate Direct Action, shut down the pipeline, which carries oil from Canadian tar sands to the U.S, for about seven hours.

Submission + - AT&T (T) to Unveil ECOMP in Open Source Industry in 1Q17 (yahoo.com)

walterbyrd writes: U.S. telecom giant AT&T Inc. T is moving ahead with plans to introduce its Enhanced Control, Orchestration, Management and Policy (ECOMP) virtualization platform in the open source industry in the first quarter of 2017. In relation to this, the company announced that it will release all 8.5 million lines of code for ECOMP. AT&T further claims that it has plans to standardize ECOMP as one of the best automated platforms for managing virtual network functions and other software-centric network operations in the telecom industry.

Meanwhile, AT&T also moved ahead to release ECOMP as an open source software in collaboration with the Linux Foundation.

Submission + - Is google manipulating search results to influence election?

walterbyrd writes: New article on "Frontpagemag" : HOW GOOGLE IS STEERING USERS AWAY FROM CLINTON HEALTH WOES. This issue has come up before. Last June snopes denied this was happening. But this undated article by on wikileaks seems to support the idea that Google has been manipulating search results. A lot of people on twitter have compared search results from the three major search engines, and seem to feel that Google is manipulating results. Would be interested to know if people on slashdot have any thoughts about this.

Submission + - Google Fiber reportedly told to cut half its staff to offset subscriber shortfal (zdnet.com)

walterbyrd writes: Alphabet CEO Larry Page is not happy with the speed of Google Fiber's rollout and last month told the unit's chief Craig Barratt to halve the unit's headcount to 500 and cut costs, sources told The Information.
Yet for all the costs sunk into Google Fiber, the service only had around 200,000 subscribers by the end of 2014, according to The Information, a figure that is well short of the five million hoped for within five years.

Submission + - 'Star Trek' actor Anton Yelchin dies in freak car accident (cnn.com) 1

walterbyrd writes: Actor Anton Yelchin, 27, who played Chekov in recent "Star Trek" movies, was killed in a freak accident early Sunday morning, police told CNN.

Yelchin stepped out of his car in the driveway of his Studio City home at around 1:10 a.m. PT when the car slid backwards and pinned him against a brick pillar and a security fence, causing trauma that led to his death, said Jennifer Houser with the Los Angeles Police Department.

Submission + - Court upholds 'net neutrality' rules for equal internet access (chicagotribune.com)

walterbyrd writes: In a big win for the Obama administration, a federal appeals court on Tuesday upheld the government's "net neutrality" rules that require internet providers to treat all web traffic equally.

The 2-1 ruling from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit is a victory for consumer groups and content companies such as Netflix that want to prevent online content from being blocked or channeled into fast and slow lanes.

Submission + - Systemd now kills processes when you sign out (pcworld.com) 4

walterbyrd writes: The initialization software systemd has now been integrated into most popular Linux distributions, including the latest versions of Ubuntu. But a change in systemd 230 alters the way Linux and other UNIX-like operating systems have worked for decades, and some Linux users aren’t pleased.

Systemd now kills processes when you sign out Thanks to a new change, systemd will automatically kill a user’s processes when that user logs out. Previously, it was possible to start long-running processes that remained running, even when you signed out. You could use the tmux, screen, or nohup commands to ensure that a process remained running. Systemd will now kill all those leftover processes to clean things up.

This change is being debated in Debian’s bug tracker, and on Fedora’s mailing list. On Fedora’s mailing list, systemd’s Lennart Poettering explained that systemd is designed to be “a process babysitter.” Red Hat’s DJ Delorie expressed why he and some other Linux users are frustrated: “It’s becoming a user nanny instead. I wish it would stop trying to enforce its ‘my way or the highway’ approach to system rules. I’ve been playing whack-a-mole trying to keep up with all the tweaks I need (assuming I can find them) to let me do what I want to do with my own machine.”

There’s a new secret handshake Of course, systemd provides a way to disable this behavior and keep processes running, if that’s what you want. To do this, a system administrator can set the “KillUserProcesses=no” option in systemd’s configuration file at /etc/systemd/logind.conf. Linux distributions could also choose to disable this systemd feature for all their users, which is what some Debian and Fedora users are asking for. In both cases, the feature would be disabled systemwide.

If just a specific user wants to run processes that are left alone by systemd, that user has to enable “lingering” for their account, with the systemd-run command preceding the tmux, screen, or nohup commands. So, if you end up using a Linux distribution with systemd 230 or newer that has this option enabled, you’ll need to run tmux, screen, and nohup commands in a systemd-specific way. It would make sense for these tools to become systemd-aware to negate this new secret handshake, but they aren’t, and users will therefore need to use this new workaround.

Submission + - Google beats Oracle: Android makes "fair use" of Java APIs (arstechnica.com)

walterbyrd writes: Following a two-week trial, a federal jury concluded Thursday that Google's Android operating system does not infringe Oracle-owned copyrights because its re-implementation of 37 Java APIs is protected by "fair use." The verdict was reached after three days of deliberations.
Oracle, however, vowed to appeal.

Submission + - EPA's Ties to Monsanto Could Be Disastrous for the US (truth-out.org)

walterbyrd writes: Dozens of papers cited in the retracted EPA report on glyphosate are "unpublished regulatory studies," meaning that they weren't peer-reviewed and it's unclear how the data was collected or tested. As Nathan Donley with the Center for Biological Diversity wrote in a press release, "The EPA's analysis relied heavily on industry-funded studies that have not undergone public scrutiny, while the WHO used publicly available research for its analysis."

Submission + - Climatologist Richard Lindzen claims climate change is bunk (youtube.com)

walterbyrd writes: Richard Lindzen claims to be an MIT atmospheric physicist and one of the world's leading climatologists. He claims that climate change is bunk. He further claims that those supporting the idea of climate change, only do so for money.

Lindzen received $2,500 a day to consult with coal and oil interests here and abroad in the 1990s, a fact Lindzen does not refute.

Submission + - IT employees at EmblemHealth fight to save jobs (computerworld.com)

walterbyrd writes: IT employees at EmblemHealth are organizing to stop the New York-based employer from outsourcing their jobs to offshore provider Cognizant.

Employees say the insurer is on the verge of signing a contract with Cognizant, an IT services firm and one of the largest users of H-1B workers. They say the contract may be signed as early as this week.

They fear what a contract with an IT services offshore firm may mean: Humiliation as part of the "knowledge transfer" process, loss of their jobs or a "rebadging" to Cognizant, which they see as little more than temporary employment. Many of the workers, about 200 they estimate, are older, with 15-plus-year tenures. This means a hard job search for them.

The IT employees have decided not go quietly.

Submission + - Bill Nye wants climate change deniers jailed (washingtontimes.com) 1

walterbyrd writes: “Was it appropriate to jail the guys from Enron?” said Mr. Nye in a video interview with Climate Depot’s Marc Morano. “We’ll see what happens. Was it appropriate to jail people from the cigarette industry who insisted that this addictive product was not addictive, and so on.”

“In these cases, for me, as a taxpayer and voter, the introduction of this extreme doubt about climate change is affecting my quality of life as a public citizen,” Mr. Nye said. “So I can see where people are very concerned about this and they’re pursuing criminal investigations as well as engaging in discussions like this.”

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