Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×
It's funny.  Laugh.

Could UK Tax Breaks Pave the Way For GTA London? 137

BanjoTed writes "An interesting — if tongue-in-cheek — bit of speculation is up at MCV about the possibility of a Grand Theft Auto title across the pond. 'Chancellor Alistair Darling's pledge to support the video games development industry with tax breaks could do more than simply protect the future of the UK dev sector,' the site claims. 'It could also have dictated the setting of the next Grand Theft Auto.' Its reasoning? That developers will only be eligible for new UK tax breaks if their games can be proven to be 'culturally British.' Being based in the UK alone is not sufficient for this — instead, the games in question must promote Britishness. Hence MCV's conclusion that Grand Theft Auto V may well be set in London — saving Rockstar an estimated $16m in the process."
Google

Submission + - PageRank-type algorithm from the 1940s discovered (technologyreview.com)

KentuckyFC writes: The PageRank algorithm (pdf) behind Google's success was developed by Sergey Brin and Larry Page in 1998. It famously judges a page to be important if it is linked to by other important pages. This circular definition is the basis of an iterative mechanism for ranking pages. Now a paper tracing the history of iterative ranking algorithms describes a number of earlier examples. It discusses the famous HITS algorithm for ranking web pages as hubs and authorities developed by Jon Kleinberg a few years before PageRank. It also discusses various approaches from the 1960s and 70s for ranking individuals and journals based on the importance of those that endorse them. But the real surprise is the discovery of a PageRank-type algorithm for ranking sectors of an economy based on the importance of the sectors that supply them, a technique that was developed by the Harvard economist Wassily Leontief in 1941.
Security

Submission + - Time Bomb May Have Destroyed 800 Norfolk City PCs (krebsonsecurity.com)

krebsonsecurity writes: The City of Norfolk, Virginia is reeling from a massive computer meltdown in which an unidentified family of malicious code destroyed data on nearly 800 computers citywide. The incident is still under investigation, but city officials say the attack may have been the result of a computer time bomb planted in advance by an insider or employee and designed to trigger at a specific date, according to krebsonsecurity.com. "We don't believe it came in from the Internet. We don't know how it got into our system," the city's IT director said. "We speculate it could have been a time bomb waiting until a date or time to trigger. Whatever it was, it essentially destroyed these machines.
The Internet

Submission + - Powerful Linux ISP Router Distribution?

fibrewire writes: I'm building a Wireless ISP using commercial grade, low cost equipment. My main stumbling block is that I cannot find a decent open source ISP class routing distribution. Closest thing to even a decent tool is Ubiquiti's AIRControl — but even it doesn't play well with other network monitoring software. I've used Mikrotik's RouterOS for 5 years, but it just isn't built for what i need. I don't mind paying licensing fees, but $300K for a Cisco Universal Broadband Router is out of my budget. Has anyone seen any good open-source/cheap hardware/software systems that will scale to several thousand users?
Businesses

Submission + - Pay the Debt or Save Away (optimalupgrades.ca)

ekochman writes: Unexpected money can help get rid of an outstanding debt — but have you considered the reasons you might be better off putting the money into an investment, even at a lower interest rate?

Submission + - Is Amazon EC2 Oversubscribed? (infoq.com)

snitch writes: "There have been various reports from the community of Amazon EC2 users, that their instances are suffering poor performance, as the result of high internal network latency. This has led to speculations that Amazon's Cloud might be getting oversubscribed.

Alan Williamson from aw2.0 Ltd, has written a report about his experiences with Amazon EC2, where he claims that Amazon, as every Cloud provider his company has tried out, seems to scale well at the beggining but there is a tipping point .

Similarly cloudkick has reported high network latency for its instances."

Google

Submission + - China Emphasizes Laws as Google Defies Censorship (pcworld.com)

Lomegor writes: Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Jiang Yu said on Thursday that all companies are welcome to operate in China but that they must do so under local laws. Although not explicitly, this is in some way a response to Google threat to leave the country. China also stated that they strict cyber laws and that the it forbids any kind of "hacking attack"; when asked if those laws apply to the government as well it was quickly avoided.
"It is still hard to say whether Google will quit China or not. Nobody knows," the official in the State Council Information Office was quoted as saying.

Submission + - NY court OKs Internet music sales lawsuit (yahoo.com)

An anonymous reader writes: According to this AP story: "A federal appeals court revived an antitrust lawsuit Wednesday that accuses major record labels controlling 80 percent of U.S. digital music sales of scheming together to charge high prices."

Looks like interesting times ahead for the RIAA and friends... :)

Slashdot Top Deals

Never say you know a man until you have divided an inheritance with him.

Working...