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Comment Re:It's true (Score 2) 284

Pixar was unique in Silicon Valley companies in that we had deadlines that could not move. The film had to be in theaters before Christmas, etc. I'd see employees families come to Pixar to have dinner with them. I took the technical director training but decided to stay in studio tools, first because Pixar needed better software more than they needed another TD, and second because of the crazy hours.

Comment News to Me... (Score 1) 166

Here in the San Francisco bay area, AT&T has been running an ad for the last couple months or so on one of those electronic billboards advertising gigabit fiber service. Well, if they're actually offering it somewhere on the peninsula, I have no idea where, because every time I check on their site, they claim it's not yet available in my area, despite the fact that I've seen their trucks running around the area apparently putting up new cabling of some sort. Google seems to have gotten bored with Google Fiber, so I'm not holding my breath for them anymore. In fact, the only ISP I know is offering gigabit fiber service in the bay area is Sonic.net, in a very slow, limited roll-out.

Comment Re: The problem with your explanation (Score 1) 307

If you look in the FEMA site, they say that they provide gramts to perform repairs not covered by insurance. And no, they don't do a needs test. Now, the typical rich person does not let their insurance lapse just so that they can get a FEMA grant. Because such a grant is no sure thing. They also point out that SBA loans are the main source of assistance following a disaster. You get a break on interest, but you have to pay them back.

Comment Re: The problem with your explanation (Score 1) 307

I understand your point about view land being desirable even though it's a flood risk. I live a mile or so from the Hayward fault. But I have California's risk pool earthquake insurance. The government wouldn't be paying me except from a fund that I've already paid into. I imagine that the government does pay some rich people in similar situations, but as far as I'm aware disaster funds go to the States from the federal government and should not in general become a form of rich people's welfare. Maybe you can find some direct evidence to show me that would make the situation more clear.

Comment Re:The problem with your explanation (Score 1) 307

What you are observing is economics. As a city or town population grows, the best land becomes unavailable and those who arrive later or have less funds available must settle for less desirable land. Thus many cities have been extended using landfill which liquifies as the San Francisco Marina District did in the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, or floods. Risks may not be disclosed by developers, or may be discounted by authorities as the risks of global warming are today.

Efforts to protect people who might otherwise buy such land or to mitigate the risks are often labeled as government over-reach or nanny state.

Comment Re:The problem with your explanation (Score 1) 307

Oh, of course they were caused by misguided engineering efforts. Everything from the Army Corps of Engineers to Smoky Bear goes under that heading. The most basic problem is the fact that we locate cities next to resources and transportation, which means water, without realizing where the 400-year flood plane is. Etc. We have learned something since then.

Our problem, today, is fixing these things. Which is blocked by folks who don't believe in anthropogenic climate change, or even cause and effect at all. They don't, for the most part, register Democratic.

Comment The problem with your explanation (Score 5, Insightful) 307

The problem with your explanation is that it's fact-based, and stands on good science. This is the post-truth era. Thus, the counter to your argument will be:

  • Evidence for a human cause of erosion is thin and controversial, and is being pushed by loony liberals.
  • We need those oil and shipping jobs, and jobs building and maintaining levees, not more regulation that stifles them!
  • Cause and effect is not a real thing, except for one cause, God is behind everything.
  • This is part of God's plan for us. The end time is coming, and when the Rapture arrives it will not matter that Louisiana's coast has eroded. Cease your pursuit of unholy science and pray to save your soul!

Comment Re:So... (Score 1) 342

so far hasn't done anything irreversible.

I think the first victims have been farmers who can't bring in their crops. Just the people who voted for him in California's central valley and wherever else we depend on guest workers. I don't see citizens lining up to pick those crops. The small family farmers, what's left of them, will feel this worse, the large corporate ones have the lawyers necessary to help them break the rules and truck people in from South of the border.

The second group of victims will be the ones who need health care that doesn't come from a big company. It's a lot more difficult to start a small business when there is no affordable way to get health care. And that is the case for my own small business - I'd be in bad shape if my wife left the University. I think that's the real goal - to keep people from leaving employment in larger companies and going off on their own.

Comment Re:So... (Score 4, Interesting) 342

Donald Trump, unfortunately, satisfies a common desire among the populance to right things by means that won't actually right them. It's a desire to rid Washington of inaction by cleaning it out of the current folks who don't seem to get anything done: and then you find that the things they were working on are harder than you understood. It's the feeling that you can get things going right by having a manager who lights a fire under the responsible people: just the way that bank managers pressured employees to increase revenue or be fired until those employees started opening accounts fraudulently for customers who hadn't asked for them.

What I am having a hard time with is how our country gets back out of this. I fear Humpty has had such a great fall that there is no peaceful recovery.

Comment Re:Lack of torrents is a bad sign (Score 1) 84

I'll let you in on a little secret: As you can see from the Kickstarter page, people who contributed at a certain level and above were granted access to downloadable copies of the entire season -- all fourteen episodes.

However, throughout the entire production and post-production process, Joel has sent out updates to all the Kickstarter backers explaining that, if MST3K proves successful, Netflix may pick it up for another season. But in order for that to happen, Netflix needs to see that the viewing numbers would support such an investment. Therefore, he has firmly but respectfully asked backers not to share their downloadable copies with anyone. Since you claim that no torrents of the season are available, it would appear his request has, so far, been honored.

...Which is, kind of, y'know, what we've been saying the model should be all this time, right? Respect the artist's work and wishes? Well, so far, it looks like that's what's happening, so he can keep doing it.

Comment Re:Oh come on (Score 5, Informative) 606

You are in seriously [sic] need of some perspective.

I *HAVE* perspective, you twit.

I was around when Canter and Siegel "discovered" spamming, and suddenly the burden of deflecting what became billions of unwanted, exploitative, obnoxious emails fell upon the end-users, the people least equipped to deal with it. (And no, spam is by no means a, "solved problem," or a large chunk of Barracuda Networks' business would no longer exist.)

I was around when that chowderhead Brendan Eich kluged JavaScript into Netscape and fscking enabled it by default, even though the massive problems with macro viruses in Microsoft Word in the years prior clearly showed what that would lead to. Now we have scripts being uncritically yanked in from thousands of sources, rampaging around in our browsers looking for any datum they can exploit to our disadvantage.

Mark my words: If BK and its ad agency aren't smacked for this, hard, it will get worse very quickly. Every media source will become an attack vector. And sophists such as you will dryly intone, "Get better security," fully aware that that aphorism will solve nothing.

And lest you think I'm merely a member of the Tinfoil Hat Brigade: I, too, can be a smug shit about this. I have never trusted cookies or JavaScript, keep my browsers thoroughly nerfed, and I use a console-based mail reader. The result is I have only moderate patience for people victimized by advertising, malware, or phishing. The tools are there; they have but to learn how to use them. Don't even cost nothin'. But there is a boundary when you stop being a Clever Clogs for making the other guy's computer unexpectedly go beep and you become an active exploiter and victimizer of the weak and ignorant.

BK crossed that line. They need to be smacked.

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