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Comment Re:Inherent superiority (Score 3) 596

There is also a gap in what a persons fantasy life is vs what they publicly say and do. Ones fantasy life may not be inline with their own values. I am sure most of us has some sexual fetish that others will find distasteful. And we well know if we fully try to find our fantasy it will be just impractical.
This is the problem on spying on people and digging up dirt on them. They find something then extrapolate an intention that isn't based on reality.

Comment Re:While its not my cup of tea (Score 1) 596

Still there is an issue of firing someone over their sexual preferences. He may be prominent person in the project but still he is a general nobody (like all of us). In the terms of PR there isn't really that level of backlash. For most people they have their fantasy life and then their real life and most people know their fantasy may not be practical, healthy, or good past the end of the sexual urge.
Being the prevalent of information on every sort of fetish available on the internet I expect most people may have something in their browser history that is questionable and may say something against the normal values that you stand up for.

Comment 13 times less? (Score 1) 159

What are we supposed to infer from this?

engineers in India's tech hub cost 13 times less than their Silicon Valley counterparts

So, the engineers in Silicon Valley cost less than somewhere else, but the ones in India are thirteen times MORE less expensive than the ones in SV? Or are we supposed to gather that the SV engineers cost something that we should all consider a good baseline, but that the Indian engineers cost roughly 8% of that amount?

Lazy writers, being lazy.

Comment Re:Mint (Score 3, Informative) 486

The real question before the quick answer is what hardware do you have?
Mint and Ubuntu are relatively good at hardware support. However there may be that one piece of hardware that makes your experience difficult. An off brand wifi controller, an odd or too old or too new video card...
some distribution have a lot of these hardware drivers installed some may be missing that one particular devices some my be GNU pure so you will need to manually get a third party non gnu library to get it to work. Which may be annoying if say your wifi is out and there isn't an ethernet port.

Now Linux isn't horrible at hardware support and not meant to be scarry however some distributions work better than others based on different hardware configurations

Comment A couple questions (Score 1) 107

What's the existing license? Is this a migration from copyleft to a more permissive license, or is this a migration from an unusual license (some kind of openbsd license?) to something more standard?

Also:

Oracle is proud to extend its collaboration with the OpenSSL Foundation by relicensing its contributions of elliptic curve cryptography

What company that Oracle has bought originally contributed this?

Comment Re:Yeah, real "terrifying" (Score 1) 195

Kitchen knife use case #1: Kill insufficiently Muslim heathens working for the oppressive British Government! (this use case was seen just the other day)

Kitchen knife use case #2: Make a sandwich. (this use case also seen just the other day)

Maybe you don't have the problem. But, for example, a city here in our state has been known to have a problem with "protesters" deciding that they're going to fix the problems with the culture in their local neighborhood by smashing the few remaining businesses in that neighborhood and burning the houses of the few little old ladies who haven't already decided they'd be safer living elsewhere as a homeless street person than in the middle of place like that.

The cops are too scared to even attempt to mitigate all of that violence and destruction unless they have function physical protection while trying to push a mob of looting arsonists away from the stores they're trying to destory. A tool that helps them to do that is a good thing. If somebody has a problem with the fact that a politician with the wrong idea about things might use such a tool to chase away people who aren't being violent and destructive, then they need to vote for different politicians. In the meantime, recognize the fact that there actually ARE violent, destructive herds of "protesters" who actually do get together to destroy and smash and steal things, and that it's absurd to tell a police officer to risk being, say, burned alive or having her head caved in to try to repel looters. A tool is a tool. There are always going to be outlandish or absurd use cases. If there is NO good use case (say... police batons with spikes on them?) then of course the tool is worth ridiculing. Giving cops a tool to protect themselves while preserving others' lives and property is a good thing. Misusing it is a bad thing, but that's true of cop cars and every other tool they've always had.

Comment Re:As unpopular as it will be to hear... (Score 1) 155

It still depends. There are a lot of factors. And quite frankly how the product is licensed is way down on the bottom of conserned. Most organizations are able to negotiate better contract with these companies. Do you think a 1,000+ employee companies will be using standard windows licenses? No they will negotiate with Microsoft for a license and conditions that fit there needs. With FOS it is what you get that comes with it. If it is GNU you better be sure that you don't use it in your product if you want to sell it. BSD, MIT and Apache licenses also have their own issues but you get what you get and often have little chance to negotiate with someone to make it suit your needs.
There are costs to an organization that isn't to the individual. For the individual the time wasted learning a FOS software is their own time and often enjoyable hobby. But to a company have to pay someone to learn this is expensive and there are factors such as product lifespan, and ability to find employees who knows how to use that tool and training resources available. All these factors makes the license cost a drop in the bucket.
Not FOS is overall a good thing and companies shouldn't shy away from it there are a lot of professional tools out there that can save you a ton of money. However not all of them.

Comment Re:Take whoever came up with this (Score 0) 152

Well, you're just wrong. I've personally watched inventory shrinkage drop into the measurement noise with the introduction of technology-based tools that catch the people who steal - because other employees understand there are consequences.

Yes, it's a shame that throughout all of human history and in every level of society and income, some people like to steal stuff. Someone who is trying to make a living running a business and who has to make payroll every week and keep customers happy won't usually have a lot of luck changing human nature. Now, I know that you've personally solved these human nature problems in your own area, and no longer feel any need to lock your doors or in any way look after your personal safety, because you've fixed everybody that you might encounter or who might want your stuff.

Yes, people stealing things IS a problem. And taking measures to stop it from happening to you isn't irrational. Yes, more parents should raise kids that have some sort of moral compass and which are educated and motivated enough to go out and create things so that they can trade the fruit of their labors for the stuff they want, instead of stealing it. Your notion that it's wrong-headed to use convenient tools to help deal with the fact that there are lots of people out there who DO find it easier (or even, in some cases, more entertaining) to steal stuff than buy it - never mind, I realize that you're trolling. Silly me.

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