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Comment Re:Daily dose (Score 1) 66

I hadn't heard this part, so thanks. Hopefully AB will vote this current mess out before 40 years of prosperity is destroyed beyond recall. I remember when half of Calgary shopped in Great Falls (my home town :) because of high domestic prices and lack of options.

Really unfortunate when you have no good choices, but "Hold your nose and try the untried" is usually worse. And this craze for voting in "anyone who is not a white male" is bringing us a lot of Hillary Clintons and damn few Maggie Thatchers.

Best of luck getting it turned around. Canada is America's best friend in the world, and we don't want to lose you.

Comment Re:Da faq? (Score 1) 112

I've got a few cameras that require a crappy Internet Explorer only configuration "web" interface

I've seen several that require IE for in-browser AUDIO, but that's all. Every camera I've purchased can do configuration and video with any browser, and you can do audio with native apps on any platform (just not in-browser), going all the way back to Axis cameras just shy of two decades ago.

In fact, it seems ALL network cameras made today support ONVIF, so there's a compatible standard they all support (though maybe not in your browser of choice). There's nothing unreliable about any of them I've used, and I can't even remember user comments anything like that.

I'm completely unwilling to give a camera Internet access and allow it to connect to its vendor's website.

It's true they all OFFER a DDNS option, but you can easily turn that off. And recently a large number of the cheapest cameras require a proprietary phone app for setup, but there are still plenty with web interfaces that setup and work just fine with an incorrect gateway address or firewall rules preventing egress. I just bought a $30 one recently.

I'd much prefer a full Linux under my own control than a black box camera OS that wants an Internet connection and can be controlled by the vendor's website.

They're all Linux under the surface, you just need to look around for instructions on gaining access. Often it's just a one-line change in the firmware image before flashing to enable telnet access, or finding the serial port pins on the board, or similar.

Comment Re:Da faq? (Score 1) 112

I have a few of the Raspberry a+ computers I picked up for 25 bucks apiece and got cameras for at 25 apiece. I stuck them around the outside of my house and installed motion on them giving me a dirt cheap way to monitor the area.

Why in the world would you do that!? You can get WiFi PTZ cameras for as little as $25 on amazon. Pretty good ones are just a bit more, but easily far under your $50 mark.

Comment Re:Same here. (Score 2) 117

> There's no way to filter these without going to a strict whitelist (and even that has some chance of a collision error) and unfortunately whitelists aren't suitable for all people.

The way to deal with this on cellphones is to set the default ringtone to "none", and whatever ringtones you prefer to your legitimate contacts. Most telemarketers won't leave a message. The ones that do, I can screen at my own leisure.

Comment Re:Daily dose (Score 1) 66

Just spoke to someone on another forum -- Ontario resident who has the misfortune to own a house with electric heat. And in the past year their bills went from high but tolerable, to just under $700/month -- with the heat turned down as far as it can be without all the pipes freezing up, and their kids walking around wrapped in blankets.

The anti-warming types who raise such a fuss every time we have a hot summer are silent when an unusually cold winter kills a lot of people, whether through direct cold or financial hardship.

Comment Re:Why should I care again? (Score 1) 109

My broker sent money via ACH to my credit union. They sent it four days ago, and it just arrived today. Bitcoin doesn't take weekends or holidays. An hour or less to fully confirm a transaction is like lightning compared to the traditional banking system.

Note that ACH means Automated Clearinghouse i.e. the money is sent via computers. And it still takes up to 4 days.

Comment Re:Shitposting (Score 1) 3

Nope, but...

Another investigation from James O'Keefe Uncovers Plot to Chain the Trains & Shut Down DC During Inauguration

part 1
https://www.youtube.com/watch?...

part 2
https://www.youtube.com/watch?...

Okay, so there was an uptick in hate crimes, but they'll need to turn their Patented Weathercock Hate Crime Detector to point 180 degrees from its current orientation. Cuz right now they're doin' it wrong.

(still laughing at the AC's response :)

Comment Re:Burn in... Improvements? (Score 1) 238

how does the TV know the content was originally 1080p24? If you do inverse telecine on stuff which was originally recorded live interlaced you won't get very good results.

It's very easy for a filter to try reassembling fields into frames, then checking if they match, and perhaps outputting the interlaced fields to the next filter unmodified if they do not.

The pulldown pattern of duplicate fields is quite uniform and consistent, with the exception of the occasional edit, so it's obvious after just a few frames if your guess was wrong.

Comment Re:There's a Practical Charging Limit (Score 1) 198

A Gallon of gasoline is estimated to have 33.41 KwH! (A normal gas engine throws a good portion of that energy away as heat.) That gallon of gas is pretty close to what my typical household uses in the entire day for electricity! So to pull down the equivalent of a couple of gallons of gas in 20 minutes is going to take the equivalent power drain of a sub-station transformer.

That's some very bald-faced lying.

You already said that the theoretical energy of a tank of gasoline is mostly wasted, but then you go on to use that same number anyhow, as if EVs must waste just as much energy, for some reason. In fact electric motors and Li-Ion batteries are very efficient, while gasoline engines are very inefficient, so the numbers.

In fact a Tesla Model S battery ranges from 60-100 kWh depending on how much you spend, so your gas tank is only 2-3 gallons of theoretical gasoline, while still transporting you 300 miles.

A 60kWh charge in 20 minutes would be no problem for businesses. It's only 375A@480V (3-phase). Here's what 1200 amp, 3-phase electrical service looks like:
http://www.pesnj.com/uploads/2...
Does that look like a "sub-station transformer" to you?

A typical house doesn't use a 480 volt industrial power feed. You don't want much more current in the hands of consumers.

Why in the world would you need 20 minute charging AT HOME? What kind of emergency would necessitate that? Two people sharing a car, both commuting 100+ miles to work, on different shifts?

Most everyone else plugs-in their car, then GOES TO SLEEP. Who cares whether it charges in 10 minutes, or 10 hours, AT HOME?

Comment Re:Cold weather? (Score 1) 198

Our car batteries get a little cranky w/o either a trickle changer or a battery pad warmer at those temperatures.

Car starter batteries do terribly in cold weather because they are expected to deliver a huge percentage of their power in a few seconds, when cold. An EV will have a huge battery pack, which is only expected to output a small percentage of its available power gradually over the course of your drive.

In short, you'll have less range when the batteries are cold, but they will always work just fine (no start-up problems), and you might even see your range increase while you drive, as the batteries heat-up from being discharged.

And like you said, all cars in cold climates are pluged-in anyhow, so there's really no extra hassle to worry about, and they can be kept in ideal operating temperatures with inexpensive grid power.

Comment Re:Autonomous Date (Score 1) 198

Those "parlour tricks" do a pretty good job of driving already, another 4 years of machine learning and I think they'll do a stupendous job.

Autonomous cars did a pretty good job of driving a decade ago, too. I'm sure they'll do a pretty good job a decade from now, as well, but like today, still not be quite good enough.

Google's self-driving cars have reported higher incidents of accidents than human drivers, and most of them are limited to low-speeds, and still need human operators to occasionally get them out of trouble.

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