Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment Re:Heads-up Texas Holdem (Score 1) 154

You have never done any game development, it's obvious.

The step from single-player game to multiplayer game is not a simple upgrade, it's a complete shift in everything. It requires a completely different approach, not a refined version of the same approach.

In any non-trivial multiplayer game, the interactions between all the players matter, and the complexity of those is subject to combinatorial explosion. Poker being a relatively low-interaction game will not make this as bad as some others, but beating one person and beating a table of people is not the same system with a little more cycles, it quite possibly requires a different approach altogether.

It will be interesting to see the jump happen, but it is a jump, not a step.

AI beating humans at a game is merely a beta test. The real application will feed unending greed, which will never die.

Greed is a game.

Comment Re:Is it true? (Score 4, Informative) 228

I never saw that in the many years I was working primarily with C++ and a regular reader of the related newsgroups. When Bjarne did contribute in any forums I followed, he generally seemed direct and reasonable, and it was usually in the more advanced discussions about tricky areas or the future of the language.

Comment Re:saving money (Score 1) 109

Is that US-only or is that the story they are telling?

I look at Spain and Italy and Greece and while they didn't have the best economy to start with, it was the bailouts that did them in.

I also wonder, where did these billions come from? The stock exchange is a zero-sum game. So who paid these billions to the taxpayer?

Comment test run (Score 1) 199

Which manufacturing capacity does ISIS have left? Which engineers have not yet run away from the sinking ship?

Someone is using ISIS as a test run for their latest toy, and it's not the Russians (they would test by themselves). Expect the US or some of its allies to use weaponized small drones in the next war against the next terrorists, the result of "years of military research".

Comment Re:Expected /. response (Score 1) 502

Well, I don't think staying on Windows 7 is a losing battle, for reasons I've described in my other comments in this Slashdot discussion. Short version: It works just fine for now and for the near future. I hope Microsoft will change their strategy before the Windows 7 option eventually ceases to be viable, but if they don't, yes, we will look at migrating to some other platform.

Another comment I was writing prompted me to look at how much of the software we use in my small businesses these days is still proprietary native Windows applications, and it's actually a very short list these days. Most of what we run natively on the desktop and literally everything we run on our servers is now freely available and widely portable to different platforms. The rest of what we run is hosted either on those servers or online and accessed via browsers and sometimes also mobile apps. The number of software packages we depend on that are actually Windows-only is trending to zero, and might well reach zero within the useful lifetime of our current Windows 7 systems.

Comment Re:Expected /. response (Score 2) 502

Obvious, but possibly naive. Small businesses in first world economies typically make more money, employ more people, and basically do and contribute more as a group than large businesses. And as the saying goes, every successful large business was once a successful small business. Also, small IT businesses, independent professionals, and "prosumer" geeks are disproportionately influential when it comes to IT decisions. Playing to the huge enterprise customers at the expense of the little guys may be a successful strategy for the short term, but in the longer term, neglecting the little guys will surely come back to haunt them.

Comment Re:People agree that Windows 10 has better tech (Score 1) 502

It's easy to say you have better tech if you ignore the complaints about it.

That's been Microsoft's SOP for a long time. Remember when they said they hadn't broken the networking in Windows 7, even though it suddenly took minutes or hours to copy large numbers of files over in Explorer that would have taken seconds or minutes on XP, or even from the command prompt on the same Windows 7 box?

Comment Re:Upgrade refuseniks are idjits (Score 1) 502

Not necessarily. For example, we're good for another hardware cycle at this point, and our software base is all paid up and permanently licensed to go with those machines, to the extent that we're still running proprietary local applications anyway.

For business planning purposes, we are assuming that by the time we get to our next major upgrade window, either Microsoft will have come to its senses regarding the Pro version of Windows typically used by smaller businesses like ours, or some other platform will be more attractive anyway.

Unless some of our businesses expand significantly more rapidly than anticipated after the possibility of buying new PCs and using downgrade rights has run out but before we migrate to some other platform, we're fine.

Comment Re:More like... (Score 5, Insightful) 502

Quite. I read this:

Microsoft says that continued usage of Windows 7 increases maintenance and operating costs for businesses.

and my immediate thought -- as someone who runs a few small IT businesses and is typing this on a Windows 7 PC -- was... well, it would be impolite to write my actual immediate thought at the time, so let's paraphrase it as "No, it doesn't".

With Windows 10, we offer our customers the highest level of security and functionality at the cutting edge.

The thing about cutting edges is that if you're not careful, you get hurt. And I have little interest in helping Microsoft's security at the expense of my own businesses.

Oh, and just for completeness while we're debunking every single statement in TFS, we bought a final round of PC gear just in time to still get Windows 7 preinstalled, and so far the total number of devices or software products we wanted to use that haven't been compatible with it has been 0, and the number of malware infections we've had to deal with has also been 0. Literally the only thing we've had to do with drivers that was even slightly awkward was slipstreaming USB3 drivers in when installing because PCs tend to have all USB3 ports these days, in contrast to the numerous reports of driver compatibility problems with Windows 10. We're far more concerned about the potential security, reliability and confidentiality risks fundamentally built into Windows 10 than we are about any threats Windows 10 is supposedly better equipped to defend against than Windows 7.

Ironically, the single most annoying and time-consuming thing in setting up those new PCs was applying the latest Windows security patches, because Microsoft have made such a dog's dinner of Windows Update in recent times that you basically have to use one of the alternative channels instead of the built-in one. And they want us to move to a new OS that relies on their update infrastructure and gives even less control over when it runs or what it does? Don't make me laugh.

Slashdot Top Deals

Computer programmers do it byte by byte.

Working...