Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment Re:Strange Logic (Score 1) 216

Manning wasn't pardoned. He had his sentence commuted. That means, in the view of the US government, she'd served enough of his sentence, not that the government agreed with what he did. This was after 7 years of imprisonment, during which time she was tortured. The US government can take the position that what Manning did was wrong, and something it wants to discourage, while still feeling that she had suffered enough.

Snowden hasn't been tried or convicted, and as a result the US government cannot reasonably say he's been "punished enough" without their position being that leaking state secrets isn't a crime that rises to the level of any punishment at all.

That's the logic behind pardoning Manning but not Snowden.

Comment Re:Price has other factors (Score 1) 89

I suspect that sentence was mangled between brain and keyboard, because a hallmark of cheap* phones is that they don't get updates, and the entire point of the sentence is to suggest that Android One devices are superior to regular cheap phones.

* Yeah, OK, let's be honest, almost all Android phones, cheap or not, don't get updated.

Comment Re:Best fucking part (Score 1) 756

So just to be clear, Britain and Sweden are organizing a very public extradition process so that the two nations can cooperate with a secret request by the US to (illegally, in both countries) kidnap Assange, transfer him to Saudi Arabia, and torture him there?

Why bother? Why not just let the US do the kidnapping on British soil?

Comment Re:Your move, Assange.... (Score 1) 756

I think everyone's missing the major loophole here. I'm not sure there even is an extradition request from the US for Assange, but even if there is one, the laws an Australian citizen can be prosecuted for regarding US secrets are dubious.

The actual extradition request that actually matters, the one the UK has agreed to, is to Sweden. Assange doesn't mention that one.

As you point out, it's not offer for a some future negotiation of a treaty. And as others have pointed out, "Clemency" somehow only meaning "pardoning" isn't Assange's escape route either. But it'd be interesting if he was extradited to the US, and then promptly extradited to Sweden.

Comment Re:False premise (Score 1) 482

Well, it hasn't happened yet. That said, why would you cancel your cable Internet for this? Yes, cellular Internet will be useful for your Chromebook when you're away from home, but in the same way it is today - a useful supplementary service that fills in the gaps, not as your primary system.

As for how you'd connect to a server at home, there are two options: VPN, or IPv6. The latter tends to get forgotten, but I connect to machines at home directly via IPv6 from my (T-Mobile) cellular connection without any problems. This sounds horrifying in terms of security, but if you imagine the development server being as locked down as a Chromebook or iDevice, without the back doors associated with too many modern IoT devices, it should be fine.

I'm more bothered about having to develop using a web interface, especially in an era in which leaving Firefox open for a day with 20 or so tabs open seems to result in it eating 4+Gb of memory, not the connectivity part. The connectivity part is actually the nice part.

Comment Re:False premise (Score 1) 482

Maybe...

I bought a consumer NAS a year or so ago, which is a collection of servers (software, from Samba to various video streaming DLNA type things) running over GNU/Linux, connected to a big hard drive. It's still a little bit of a nerds thing, but I can totally see people wanting to use things like this to ensure they have control over their own content.

And after I got a Chromebook, I started to wonder how far off we are having similar devices that host IDEs (don't laugh, there are quite a few web based IDEs out there, Eclipse has two such projects, though in my view they're not ready for prime time.) You could, in theory, use your Chromebook as-is in the future, with a third party, locked down, server that has an IDE on it, to develop Android apps. Hell (and I mean hell), if Google gets involved, that might become the recommended development environment.

Comment Re: This will never happen, even if I want it to. (Score 2) 272

Obama has only said he can't. He's never said why. Those claiming he said he can't because of legal reasons related to admissions of guilt or trials are lying (or unwittingly repeating lies) - he's never made any such assertion.

In all honesty, the reason he "can't" probably has to do with setting a precedent. Hopefully the same principle doesn't apply to commuting a sentence, and Obama can commute Manning's before he leaves office.

Comment Re:All the best research is done in Europe (Score 1) 130

I seriously doubt there's any body of research that says that exercise, or lack thereof, has nothing to do with weight, and the only times I've successfully lost significant amounts of weight (more than 20lbs) were when I combined a more controlled diet with exercise. Simply trying to control my diet has never helped, and I know nobody who successfully lost a lot of weight without either going on a relatively dangerous starvation diet (sometimes necessary) or combining exercise with something more reasonable.

But note that I also pointed out that urban vs suburban living also determines diet.

Comment Re:All the best research is done in Europe (Score 1) 130

Yes, I also lived there. I said absolutely nothing to contradict that, pointing out merely that there are more overweight people in the US, that the average Brit weighs less, and I also pointed out, referring to my own case, that many people who are overweight don't look it.

Slashdot Top Deals

The Macintosh is Xerox technology at its best.

Working...