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Submission + - ATSC 3.0: Cord Cutter's Dream or Tiered Internet Nightmare? (audioholics.com)

Audiofan writes: The FCC has approved an innovation in digital broadcast television that could change everything you thought you knew about network TV. ATSC 3.0 is the first fully interactive, 2-way, IP-based broadcast standard. It all sounds so great! When content from every corporation that wanted to crush the Net Neutrality Act rides into your home on a mini-Internet approved and subsidized by the same government that wants to spy on you and store all your personal information for later use against you — what could possibly go wrong?

Submission + - What is the best web ui toolkit? And why? (wikipedia.org)

Qbertino writes: The great thing about today is that the open standards web has basically won the platform wars. Flash is super-dead and it's a paradise of abundance of FOSS technologies all around in the frontend and backend. You could also call it a jungle. What JS/CSS/HTML5 UI toolkit would you recommend for real world projects and why? What have you had good experiences with and built working real-world products with? As a web developer it's not that I couldn't find something fitting, but I'm interested in other peoples experiences and recommendations and your educated opinion. Thanks.

Submission + - Proposed US Law Would Allow Employers to Demand Genetic Testing (businessinsider.com)

capedgirardeau writes: A little-noticed bill moving through the US Congress would allow companies to require employees to undergo genetic testing or risk paying a penalty of thousands of dollars, and would let employers see that genetic and other health information. Giving employers such power is now prohibited by US law, including the 2008 genetic privacy and nondiscrimination law known as GINA. The new bill gets around that landmark law by stating explicitly that GINA and other protections do not apply when genetic tests are part of a 'workplace wellness' program.

Submission + - Vault 7: CIA seems to be making America unsafe again (itwire.com)

troublemaker_23 writes: While US President Donald Trump is working to make America great again, the CIA appears to be hard at work to make the country unsafe again. No other conclusion can be drawn following the massive data dump by WikiLeaks overnight on Tuesday US time that contained details of exploits for numerous common operating systems – Windows, macOS, OS X, Android, iOS, Linux, and others.

Submission + - Stunning close-up of Saturn's moon, Pan, reveals a space empanada (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: Astronomers have long known that Pan, one of Saturn’s innermost moons, has an odd look. Based on images taken from a distance, researchers have said it looks like a walnut or a flying saucer. But now, NASA’s Cassini probe has delivered stunning close-ups of the 35-kilometer-wide icy moon, and it might be better called a pan-fried dumpling or an empanada.

Submission + - USB Death Sticks for Sale (arstechnica.com)

npslider writes: "A USB Killer", a USB stick that fries almost everything that it is plugged into has been mass produced—available online for about £50/$50. Arstechnica first wrote about this diabolical device that looks like a fairly humdrum memory stick a year ago. From the ARS article:

"The USB Killer is shockingly simple in its operation. As soon as you plug it in, a DC-to-DC converter starts drawing power from the host system and storing electricity in its bank of capacitors (the square-shaped components). When the capacitors reach a potential of -220V, the device dumps all of that electricity into the USB data lines, most likely frying whatever is on the other end. If the host doesn't just roll over and die, the USB stick does the charge-discharge process again and again until it sizzles.

Since the USB Killer has gone on sale, it has been used to fry laptops (including an old ThinkPad and a brand new MacBook Pro), an Xbox One, the new Google Pixel phone, and some cars (infotainment units, rather than whole cars... for now). Notably, some devices fare better than others, and there's a range of possible outcomes—the USB Killer doesn't just nuke everything completely."


Submission + - SPAM: 6 seconds: How hackers only need moments to guess card number and security code 1

schwit1 writes: Criminals can work out the card number, expiry date and security code for a Visa debit or credit card in as little as six seconds using guesswork, researchers have found.

Fraudsters use a so-called Distributed Guessing Attack to get around security features put in place to stop online fraud, and this may have been the method used in the recent Tesco Bank hack.

According to a study published in the academic journal IEEE Security & Privacy, that meant fraudsters could use computers to systematically fire different variations of security data at hundreds of websites simultaneously.

Within seconds, by a process of elimination, the criminals could verify the correct card number, expiry date and the three-digit security number on the back of the card.

Mohammed Ali, a PhD student at the university's School of Computing Science, said: "This sort of attack exploits two weaknesses that on their own are not too severe but, when used together, present a serious risk to the whole payment system.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Alien life could thrive in the clouds of failed stars (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: There’s an abundant new swath of cosmic real estate that life could call home – and the views would be spectacular. Floating out by themselves in the Milky Way galaxy are perhaps a billion cold brown dwarfs, objects many times as massive as Jupiter but not big enough to ignite as a star. According to a new study, layers of their upper atmospheres sit at temperatures and pressures resembling those on Earth, and could host microbes that surf on thermal updrafts.

The idea expands the concept of a habitable zone to include a vast population of worlds that had previously gone unconsidered. “You don’t necessarily need to have a terrestrial planet with a surface,” says Jack Yates, a planetary scientist at the University of Edinburgh in the United Kingdom, who led the study.

Submission + - Facebook started trending false news stories on a regular basis (citiesofthefuture.eu)

dkatana writes: "Facebook started trending false news stories on a regular basis." that's the conclusion of Susan Etlinger. She is an industry analyst at the thinktank, Altimeter Group, where she focuses on data strategy, analytics and ethical data use.

“In the Facebook News feed, which is optimized for engagement, the consequence is that the most controversial and provocative stories tend to be shared more than real news reporting, and Facebook has not had a way to make verification and authenticity an important part of the algorithm and then Facebook started trending false news stories on a regular basis.” That, Etlinger told Cities of the Future, “is an example where a machine has too much responsibility.”

When asked about the possibility of people using data and AI to influence political decisions and distort information to the public, Etlinger is outspoken:

We don’t even know the level of intentional misinformation that has been shared.” Etlinger says. “Obviously the US news media, as an example, is full of conspiracy theories right now. The reality is [AI] is an incredibly powerful technology, even more because it is very difficult, and in some cases impossible, to go back and understand exactly what happens in an algorithm, and AI.”

Submission + - Microsoft Outlook injecting advertisement and URL into personal email

mr_diags writes: Recently GoDaddy's iPhone email client was retired and they aggressively encouraged users to migrate to Microsoft Outlook client. I detest most Microsoft products and ended up migrating to Spark. My wife took the path of least resistance and migrated to Outlook for iPhone. Yesterday I received a short email from her and noticed a live hypertext link “Get Outlook for iOS” in her email. I asked her why she wrote that and she said she did not. Examining the email source it clearly shows the email sent from her Outlook client has text embedded in the body of her email in both the plain text and HTML sections of the payload – including a live URL.

Yes, she needs to check if Outlook client had some default configuration when installed that embedded the advertisement, maybe a default signature. And who knows what the EULA she blindly accepted allowed MS to do, but isn’t this effectively a hack of a person’s personal email to inject an advertisement?

Content of the email, scrubbed of personal addresses:

------=_Part_13617_1251458795.1470690450092
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

It's a white 6.

Get Outlook for iOS

Received: (qmail 23638 invoked by uid 30297); 8 Aug 2016 21:07:31 -0000
Received: from unknown (HELO p3plibsmtp02-14.prod.phx3.secureserver.net) ([72.167.218.25])
(envelope-sender <xxxxx@xxxxx.com>)
by p3plsmtp01-05.prod.phx3.secureserver.net (qmail-1.03) with SMTP
for <yyyy@yyyyy.us>; 8 Aug 2016 21:07:31 -0000
Received: from p3plsmtpa12-02.prod.phx3.secureserver.net ([68.178.252.231])
by p3plibsmtp02-14.prod.phx3.secureserver.net with bizsmtp
id Uku71t01H50JyDQ01l7WVW; Mon, 08 Aug 2016 14:07:31 -0700
Received: from mail.outlook.com ([52.32.165.217])
by p3plsmtpa12-02.prod.phx3.secureserver.net with
id Ul7W1t00A4hkzKG01l7Wm9; Mon, 08 Aug 2016 14:07:30 -0700
Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2016 21:07:30 +0000 (UTC)
From: xxxxx < xxxxx@xxxxx.com >
To: yyyy@yyyyy.us
Message-ID: <42D594FBB05BB1EC.2A5FFCE7-7B0A-44C6-8158-660A799F2AC9@mail.outlook.com>
In-Reply-To: <20160807214047.a3cf85ee342f91baffbcbe5e7a33596d.19fe9dae3e.wbe@email01.godaddy.com>
References: <20160807214047.a3cf85ee342f91baffbcbe5e7a33596d.19fe9dae3e.wbe@email01.godaddy.com>
Subject: Re: iPhone screens
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
boundary="----=_Part_13617_1251458795.1470690450092"
X-Mailer: Outlook for iOS and Android
X-Nonspam: Whitelist

------=_Part_13617_1251458795.1470690450092
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

It's a white 6.

Get Outlook for iOS

On Mon, Aug 8, 2016 at 12:40 AM -0400, <yyyy@yyyyy.us> wrote:

=C2=A0 =C2=A0Your screen parts shipped and ETA is Wednesday delivery.=C2=A0=
=C2=A0For your friends iPhone6 I've searched and found iPhone 6 — not 6plu=
s — screen repair kits for under $30, so depending on their model it may be=
reasonably priced to get the parts.

------=_Part_13617_1251458795.1470690450092
Content-Type: text/html; charset=utf-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

<html><head></head><body><div>It's a white 6.<br><br><div class="acompli_signature">Get <a href="https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/outlook-com/mobile/?WT.mc_id=outlook_app_signature_1">Outlook for iOS</a></div><br></div><br><br><br>
<div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Aug 8, 2016 at 12:40 AM -0400, <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:yyyy@yyyyy.us" target="_blank">yyyy@yyyyy.us</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<br>

<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

<div dir="3D&quot;ltr&quot;">
<span style="font-family:Verdana; color:#000000; font-size:10pt;"><div>&nbsp; &nbsp;Your screen parts shipped and ETA is Wednesday delivery.</div><div>&nbsp; &nbsp;For your friends iPhone6 I've searched and found iPhone 6 — not 6plus — screen repair kits for under $30, so depending on their model it may be reasonably priced to get the parts.</div></span>

</div>

</blockquote>
</div>
</body></html>
------=_Part_13617_1251458795.1470690450092--

Submission + - Russian Anti-Piracy Law Targets Social Media

An anonymous reader writes: Officials in Russia are considering a new anti-piracy law which will target social media platforms that allow users to upload copyrighted content. A coalition that includes members of the Russian media groups National Federation of Music Industry (NFMI) and the Association of Film and Television Producers (APKIT) is reviewing current legislation and making recommendations for changes that will protect the rights of those who create original content. Their primary concern is for content that is uploaded without restriction to social media platforms by users. The new proposal includes an attempt to have current legislation revoked or changed to provide stricter definitions to help protect copyrights. They are also proposing an advertising ban on sites that have been found to violate content creators rights in court.

Submission + - 1 In 3 Americans Report Financial Losses Due To Being Defrauded (helpnetsecurity.com)

An anonymous reader writes: With nearly half of Americans reporting they have been tricked or defrauded, citizens are concerned that the Internet is becoming less safe and want tougher federal and state laws to combat online criminals, according to the Digital Citizens Alliance. In the survey of 1,215 Americans, 46 percent said they had been the victim of a scam or fraud, had credit card information stolen, or had someone steal their identity. One in three Americans reported suffering financial loss – with 10 percent reporting that the loss had been over $1,000.

Submission + - Misuse of Language: 'Cyber' (threatpost.com)

msm1267 writes: The terms “cyber war” and “cyber weapon” are thrown around casually, often with little thought to their non-“cyber” analogs. Many who use the terms “cyber war” and “cyber weapon” relate these terms to “attack,” framing the conversation in terms of acceptable responses to “attack” (namely, “strike-back,” “hack-back,” or an extreme interpretation of the vague term “active defense”).

In this op-ed, information security experts Dave Dittrick and Katherine Carpeneter discuss two problematic issues: first, we illustrate the misuse of the terms “cyber war” and “cyber weapon,” to raise awareness of the potential dangers that aggressive language brings to the public and the security community; and second, we address the reality that could exist when private citizens (and/or corporations) want to act aggressively against sovereign nations and the undesirable results those actions could produce.

Dittrich and Carpenter discuss these topics through the lens of the recent furor around the cyber incident at the Democratic National Committee.

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