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Submission + - Terrible Tech Managers -- And How to Succeed Despite Them

snydeq writes: From the Know It All to the Overwhelmer, succeeding beneath a bad manager takes strategy and finesse, writes Paul Heltzel in his round-up of bad IT bosses and how to keep them from derailing your career. 'While there are truly great leaders in IT, not all inspire confidence. Worse, you can’t always choose who will lead your team. But you can always map out new paths in your career. With that in mind, here is a look at some prototypically bad managers you may have already encountered in your engineering departments, with tips on how to deal with each of them.'

Submission + - 9 Lies Programmers Tell Themselves

snydeq writes: Confidence in our power over machines also makes us guilty of hoping to bend reality to our code, writes Peter Wayner, in a discussion of nine lies programmers tell themselves about their code. 'Of course, many problems stem from assumptions we programmers make that simply aren’t correct. They’re usually sort of true some of the time, but that’s not the same as being true all of the time. As Mark Twain supposedly said, "It ain’t what you don’t know that gets you into trouble. It’s what you know for sure that just ain’t so."'

Submission + - 10 Steps To Becoming A Horrible IT Boss 1

snydeq writes: Good-bye, programming peers; hello, power to abuse at your whim, writes Bob Lewis in a send-up of an all-too-familiar situation: The engineering colleague who transforms into a greasy political manipulator upon promotion into management. 'It’s legendary: A CIO promotes his best developer into a management role, losing an excellent programmer and gaining a bad manager. The art of management isn’t so much about assembling a dream team, helping others be successful, or solving technical problems. It’s about aligning everything you do in service of the business—the business of yourself.' What tales do you have of colleagues who broke bad all the way to the top?

Submission + - 11 Predictions for the Future of Programming

snydeq writes: InfoWorld's Peter Wayner takes a long-term view of today's trends in programming to give a sense of where programmers should place their career bets in the years ahead. 'Now that 2017 is here, it’s time to take stock of the technological changes ahead, if only to help you know where to place your bets in building programming skills for the future. From the increasing security headache of the internet of things to machine learning everywhere, the future of programming keeps getting harder to predict.' How do you see technologies impacting the work of programming in the years ahead?

Submission + - 'Here Be Dragons': The 7 Most Vexing Problems in Programming

snydeq writes: 'It’s been said that the uncharted territories of the old maps were often marked with the ominous warning: “Here be dragons.” Perhaps apocryphal, the idea was that no one wandering into these unknown corners of the world should do so without being ready to battle a terrifying foe,' writes InfoWorld's Peter Wayner in a roundup of seven gnarly corners of the coding world worthy of large markers reading, 'Here be dragons.' 'Programmers may be a bit more civilized than medieval knights, but that doesn’t mean the modern technical world doesn’t have its share of technical dragons waiting for us in unforeseen places: Difficult problems that wait until the deadline is minutes away; complications that have read the manual and know what isn’t well-specified; evil dragons that know how to sneak in inchoate bugs and untimely glitches, often right after the code is committed.' What are yours?

Submission + - SPAM: 5 Strategies to Reboot Your IT Career

snydeq writes: InfoWorld's Dan Tynan offers a look at how IT pros can step out of the server closet and into a more robust (and possibly more rewarding) tech career. 'Technology changes faster than many of us can keep up with it. ... But while the hotshot programmers and big data geeks get to play with the shiny new toys, you're busy waiting for the robots to come and take away your job. It doesn't have to be that way. Whether you cut your teeth on Unix and AIX or you tire of doing the necessary but thankless tasks that come with keeping the lights on and the datacenter humming, there's still time to reinvent yourself.'

Submission + - 7 Types of Bugs Plaguing the Web

snydeq writes: From video glitches to memory leaks, today’s browser bugs may be rarer, but they are even harder to pin down, writes InfoWorld's Peter Wayner, in his roundup of the types of bugs troubling today's Web. ' Of course, it used to be worse. The vast differences between browsers have been largely erased by allegiance to W3C web standards. And the differences that remain can be generally ignored, thanks to the proliferation of libraries like jQuery, which not only make JavaScript hacking easier but also paper over the ways that browsers aren’t the same. These libraries have a habit of freezing browser bugs in place. If browser companies fix some of their worst bugs, the new “fixes” can disrupt old patches and work-arounds. Suddenly the “fix” becomes the problem that’s disrupting the old stability we’ve jerry-rigged around the bug. Programmers can’t win.' What hard-to-pin-down browser bugs have given you the most fits?

Submission + - The Power of Lazy Programming

snydeq writes: Whoever said working hard is a virtue never met a programmer, writes Peter Wayner in his roundup of tools and techniques that prove the power of lazy programming. 'Coders who ignore those “work hard, stay humble” inspirational wall signs often produce remarkable results, all because they are trying to avoid having to work too hard. The true geniuses find ways to do the absolute minimum by offloading their chores to the computer. After all, getting the computer to do the work is the real job of computer programmers.'

Submission + - Linus Torvalds on the Evolution and Future of Linux

snydeq writes: The creator of Linux talks in depth about the kernel, community, and how computing will change in the years ahead, in an interview commemorating the 25th anniversary of Linux. 'We currently have a fairly unified kernel that scales from cellphones to supercomputers, and I've grown convinced that unification has actually been one of our greatest strengths: It forces us to do things right, and the different needs for different platforms tend to have a fair amount of commonalities in the end,' Torvalds says. Read the interview for Torvalds' take on OS updates, developing for Linux, the competition, containers, and more.

Submission + - Linux at 25: How Linux Changed the World

snydeq writes: Paul Venezia offers an eyewitness account of the rise of Linux and the open source movement, plus analysis of where Linux is taking us now on its 25th anniversary. 'I walked into an apartment in Boston on a sunny day in June 1995. It was small and bohemian, with the normal detritus a pair of young men would scatter here and there. On the kitchen table was a 15-inch CRT display married to a fat, coverless PC case sitting on its side, network cables streaking back to a hub in the living room. The screen displayed a mess of data, the contents of some logfile, and sitting at the bottom was a Bash root prompt decorated in red and blue, the cursor blinking lazily,' Venezia writes. 'Those enterprising youths were actively developing code for the Linux kernel and the GNU userspace utilities that surrounded it. At that time, this scene could be found in cities and towns all over the world, where computer science students and those with a deep interest in computing were playing with an incredible new toy: a free “Unix” operating system.' What's your personal history with the rise of Linux?

Submission + - Bad Programming Ideas That Work

snydeq writes: Cheaper, faster, better side effects — sometimes a bad idea in programming is better than just good enough, writes InfoWorld's Peter Wayner. 'Some ideas, schemes, or architectures may truly stink, but they may also be the best choice for your project. They may be cheaper or faster, or maybe it’s too hard to do things the right way. In other words, sometimes bad is simply good enough. There are also occasions when a bad idea comes with a silver lining. It may not be the best approach, but it has such good side-effects that it’s the way to go. If we’re stuck going down a suboptimal path to programming hell, we might as well make the most of whatever gems may be buried there.' What bad programming ideas have you found useful enough to make work in your projects?

Submission + - Signs Your Kid Is Hacking -- And What to Do About It

snydeq writes: InfoWorld's Roger Grimes lends insight on how to recognize the signs of your child's involvement in malicious online activity before the authorities do — and offers advice on how to help them direct their skills and curiosity into a more positive (and ethical) direction. The advice is based on Grimes' personal history helping reform his stepson, a former hacker, and in mentoring a number of other young ex-hackers as an IT security veteran. 'Hacking can provide a new world of acceptance and empowerment, especially for smart teenagers who are not doing all that well in school, are bored, or are getting harassed by other teens or by their parents because they "aren't working to their full potential." In the hacking world, they can gain the admiration of their peers and be mini-cyber rock stars. It's like a drug for them, and a good percentage can turn permanently to the dark side if not appropriately guided.'

Submission + - Real-World Devops Failures -- And How To Avoid Them

snydeq writes: InfoWorld's Bob Violino offers several hard-learned lessons of devops implementations gone awry. 'There are plenty of examples of how devops works well and delivers tangible improvements for companies in a variety of industries. But sometimes it doesn't work well. Things can go wrong with devops just as they can with any other aspect of IT. Following are some examples of devops initiatives that failed on at least some level and what the organizations involved did to address the problems or prevent them from happening again.'

Submission + - Interview With a Craigslist Scammer

snydeq writes: Ever wonder what motivates people who swindle others on Craigslist? Roger Grimes did, so he set up a fake Harley Davidson ad on Craigslist, and requested an interview with each scammer who replied to the ad. One agreed, and the man's answers shed light on the inner world of Craiglist scamming: 'If you mean how often I make money from Craigslist, it depends on the day or week. Many weeks I make nothing. Some weeks I can get five people sending me money. But I respond to a lot of ads to get one email back. I’m not only doing Craigslist — there are many similar places. I haven’t counted, but many. It takes many emails to get paid. That’s what I mean. Some weeks I lose money. It’s harder than most people think. But I don’t have to go into a place at a certain time and deal with bosses and customers. I can make my own time.'

Submission + - SPAM: How to Build a Better Dev Team

snydeq writes: The secret to building and maintaining a great development team requires transparency, flexibility, and yes, good vibes, writes InfoWorld's Paul Heltzel, in a roundup of methods engineering managers have used to improve the productivity and cohesiveness of their dev teams. 'For all the talk of rock-star developers, we all know it takes a strong, coherent team working in concert to get the best work done. So here’s the question: What does it take to establish a great team of developers who create great products and work well across departments? ... From finding the best fit for your next hire to keeping your team fresh and motivated, the following collective advice will have your team coding at its best.' What tips do you have to pass along?

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