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Comment Oh, is it 4GL time again? (Score 2) 78

All you have to do is specify the requirements, then you can just graphically draw it and put the app together! That's it! That's all you'll ever need to do. And it will work, just like it did in the 90s.

Actually, it will work exactly like it did in the 90s. Which is to say not at all, and to store up a load of 4GL take-out projects for the early 2000s...

Comment Re:People are a problem (Score 1) 88

You're right that the tyranny of the majority could be a big problem, but these days initiative and referendum seems like it has some real benefits. As a safety override for legislatures which are increasingly incapable of only passing legislation beneficial to the moneyed class or so divided by partisanship they are unable to fix issues which the partisans have stakes in but which the electorate sees as non-partisan.

I'd put legalizing recreation marijuana in the category of cases where referendums served the public good. It stays illegal because the existing stakeholders in the security state and big pharma see it as antithetical to their individual interests, and most politicians are too pusillanimous to take a reasonable position on the issue.

Comment Re:Interesting to mull over effect of shapes. (Score 1) 88

You can't really compete with the concept of WWZ zombies -- they're just too fast and aggressive, but I think nearly every other invocation of them would fall away from an elliptical wall.

The other low-tech zombie fighting tool I've always wanted to see employed is a good old demining flail. These look like tanks with a combine attached on front, only the combine part is steel weights the size of melons attached to chains. They rotate and pound the ground to set off any mines.

https://youtu.be/wf6CsvAffHo?t...

If you raised the flail assembly so it just spun in the air, you could literally drive into zombie hoards at low speed and just pulp them.

My guess is that a similar apparatus on a smaller scale could probably be adapted to nearly any vehicle, probably even improvised from hydraulic sweeper attachments for Bobcats.

Comment Re:You all laugh now (Score 2) 88

I always wondered why a slope with an incline that gradually increased to vertical wasn't ever employed in zombie fiction forts. They would shamble forward until their center of mass shifted and then fall back.

With the right slope contour, you could make it so they fell back pretty far.

Another option would be a kind of blind curve, where they shamble in and then just shamble away on the other side.

Comment Re:Doing more with less.. (Score 1) 115

Why aren't these tools built in, though?

IMHO, PKI on Windows is problematic less because PKI is complex but more because the in-built tools suck or are non-existent.

Most IT admins are oversubscribed enough that writing that Powershell script or putting together the third party tools for certificate expiration won't happen, especially when you consider for most organizations the number of certificates that matter is relatively small.

I will grant an exception for Homeland Security, though, as any organization using PKI to that extent ought to have an entire team responsible for managing it, which means they would have the time/tools/experience to deal with it.

Comment Re:Doing more with less.. (Score 1) 115

I think you're basically right, PKI implementations are horribly complex in practice and doubly (or more!) so with Windows.

It seems to get worse as certificate-based security gets added into products as defaults installations. As an example, Exchange 2016 installs a self-signed certificate by default which gets assigned to SMTP and IIS. The normal (spanning back several releases) process of adding and assigning a public certificate to services doesn't change the self-signed certificate assignment and use for the IIS Exchange Back-End site or for transport connectors.

I ran into these are problems recently with a customer who deleted the self-signed certificate after installing and assigning his public certificate. Bam, dead Exchange GUI -- had to re-bind the back-end Exchange site in IIS with the public certificate.

Another customer had "verify certificates" enabled on their spam service and when they switched SMTP delivery to the new server, the self-signed cert was still being used by the front-end receive connector. It took some kludgy, un-documented Powershell to force the connector to use the public certificate -- ie, the attribute has to be built as a compound variable using sub-attributes of the public certificate combined with some text, and then that variable assigned as the TlsCertificateName on the connector.

So even if you're trying to use certificates, application behavior and certificate selection is pretty opaque in many cases and can actually ignore specific certificate assignment options.

I won't even get into the management trainwreck that is Windows certificate server, with its 2003-era dialog boxes and management tools. In my mind at least, all of this could be modernized and made much simpler to manage, but the toolchain remains completely user-hostile.

Comment Isn't this why many people voted for Trump? (Score 1) 439

Or at least semi-intelligent people?

They knew in their hearts he was kind of incompetent, but they also were so cynical about any establishment politician being able to effect meaningful change that the only way to achieve it was to empower an incompetent with the idea that it would break the system.

Of course, breaking the system has lots of unplanned side effects, too.

Comment Re:Once you take away the need for FT benefits (Score 3, Informative) 143

Dunno where you work, but around these parts all the part time jobs are scheduled by the week, and half of them will fire you if you can't show up in 30 minutes when they call you in for the lunch rush or inventory night. Oh, you're at your other job? Oh your other job wants you from 11-2PM next week too? Tough shit, but hey, you only lose half your income.

Comment Re:U.S. profits too??? (Score 1) 170

The solution is not higher taxes, it's closing these gaps that companies exploit.

Doesn't this just end up boiling down to higher effective taxes?

You total up your revenue or profits and divide by what you actually paid in taxes and that's your effective tax rate? I don't think at the scale and complexity of a corporation the size of Apple the notion of a nominal tax rate makes much sense.

So if you close loopholes to increase the absolute amount of tax paid, you're raising the effective tax rate even if the nominal one stays the same. In fact I'd be surprised that its not a rhetorical argument used in lobbying and negotiation -- don't raise our tax rate, close loophole X and we'll pay a higher effective rate (meanwhile, their tax wonks have figured out how to use loophole Y instead).

My general sense is that the larger problem isn't paying or not paying taxes, its the cash hoarding these semi-monopoly companies do. A lot of the money just ends up in short-term treasuries or other semi-liquid investment vehicles and doesn't circulate in the economy. In some ways, taxes can be seen as the economic investment of last resort -- a way to bring hoarded capital into the market.

A better policy would seem to be incentives to spend and not hoard capital so it gets put into motion in the economy.

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