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Comment Keyless drive, too (Score 1) 47

I bought a used 2007 model with keyless drive in 2009. The car's menu system showed three keys assigned to the car, and it only came with two actual keyfobs.

The bigger problem with apps seems to be that you can fire up the app anywhere and do stuff with the car. An "extra" keyfob or a poor keyway design is only really a risk if you have physical access to the car.

Although I'd grant you that a weak keyway design with a limited number of unique keys is probably a real big car theft risk due to the fact that thieves can basically shop any large parking area and match a car.

Comment Re:So many word puppets (Score 1) 892

I'm going to watch and care about Pewdiepie exactly as much as before--namely, not one bit--so the main thing I care about is that the WSJ's doing things

So, you admit that your mention of "black humor" was just horseshit?

However, since you're also going to ignore the point that, once upon a time, investigative journalists would do things exactly like test what you can get through on a place that lets you ask people to do something for 5USD, in favor of insulting me, I see no point in talking to you further.

Citation, mister, "I've spent more time in a library than a retired university professor"?

Comment Re:Shiva Ayyadurai is a fraud. (Score 3, Interesting) 52

Well, it's possible that he's mildly delusional, as most of us are about beliefs about ourselves that we hold dear.

It strikes me that Ayyadurai is in a legal catch-22 situation. Let's suppose for a moment he did "invent" email. That would make him a public figure, and the legal standard used to establish defamation is "actual malice. That's a difficult standard to meet.

I assume Ayyadurai's complaint are claims that he is a "fake" or a "liar". Suppose some random shmoe is interviewing for a job, and you tell the interviewer that he's a "liar". That is defamation, unless you have actual reason to believe he is a liar. But if you say the same thing about a politician running for office, it's NOT defamation unless you have actual reason to believe he is NOT a liar. That's because the politician is a public figure.

It seems to me nearly impossible to defame someone by calling him a liar in the context of his claiming to invent anything. His very demand to be recognized for his achievement makes him a public figure, whether that claim is true or not.

Comment Re:Managed SAP R/3 since 1993... (Score 1) 99

So do you think any ERP systems can work (defined as providing a positive return on investment)?

My guess is the success of ERP systems is probably somewhat inversely proportional to the complexity of the system. The less complex the system, the easier it and the existing business processes can be combined, the easier it will be for management to understand and use the tools and metrics and so on, and the lower the general costs are and the more likely that the technical requirements will be met without cutting corners that compromise functionality.

And there's probably a bunch of complex site-specific factors around the skill of management, their ability to comprehend and use metrics, and so on.

I'd guess if you were to graph it with "usefulness" on the Y axis and "complexity" on the X, it would look like some curve that rises quickly with features but plateaus and then drops off as complexity increases.

Comment Re:Ways around this (Score 3, Insightful) 360

Same here. Would want to visit the USA. Should be fantastic. Both the country and people. There are many American scientists and artists that I hold in great esteem.

But as usual in any country, a minority of pedantic idiots try to screw things up. In my impression such wankers are more effective in the USA than in other true constitutional democracies. Coming up with pointless moronic rules (screen data at the airport that could be transferred in other more convenient, secure and untraceable ways), applying zero tolerance and feeling good about themselves for having done "a great job" at defending the country's best interests. And then there are their vassals who by the book and ooze stupidity out of their eyes.

To the majority of Americans that do have sense I'd say that it'd be good if that same majority would convey the idea that America surely wasn't built on FUD but more likely on risk taking, convention challenging, hard working and intellect.

Comment Re:Just another mindless attack (Score 1) 441

Read the update at the end, basically makes the entire story bunk.

Here is the update, in its entirety:

Update: White House press secretary Sean Spicer told reporters Monday afternoon that Trump was briefed on North Korea in a sensitive compartmented information facility, or SCIF — a portable, secure area.

So basically, Spicer is saying, "You gonna believe me or your own lying eyes?"

Comment Re:too late (Score 4, Insightful) 441

after 8 years of Obama we have more racial tension than ever before

No, we don't. All of that racial tension you're seeing was already there. What happened was that having a black president encouraged black Americans to speak up about the ways in which they're systematically oppressed, which means that you are now more aware of the existing racial tension.

Comment Re:Just another mindless attack (Score 1) 441

Hillary did exactly that, but the left doesn't seem concerned that they are constantly hypocrites. She had an unsecured device that they told her not to use, and she did anyways. Likely was hacked while she was in Russia.

http://www.mediaite.com/online/clinton-emailed-from-unsecure-phone-because-nsa-denied-her-request-for-a-better-one/

Yes. That's a terrible breach of security when a Secretary of State does it.

It's about a hundred times worse when a President does it.

Comment Re:Managed SAP R/3 since 1993... (Score 3, Insightful) 99

I think the real problem with ERP systems is that they're so extensive they're almost like fully modeled business plans, but they kind of suffer from the "no one is average" problem where if something is designed to meet an average, it actually fits nobody.

So you end up with this complex system that doesn't actually fit your existing business process, requiring either gobs of customization to match your process and specific business, or change your business processes to match the intricacies of the software.

My guess is that once they realize this, they do both, customize and change business processes and end up doing damage to the business, at best increased expenses and short-term business disruption, or at worst, shrink the business and be saddled with expensive software that can't be shed.

Comment Re:So many word puppets (Score 1) 892

If you want this to be apples to apples, we need to send your employer a packet of everything you've said taken out of context and pressure them to fire you.

I would encourage you to do so. In fact, I would beg you to do so. While you're at it, cc: my mother-in-law, please.

It's so funny that the people who are complaining because people don't get Pewdiepie's "kill all Jews" joke are the same ones who screamed with horror when someone said, "gamers are over".

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