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Comment Re:That's bullshit (Score 5, Interesting) 282

The only actual way to reduce teen pregnancy is to encourage them to stop fucking so much

You have figures for all the other methods. What are the figures for "encouraging them to stop fucking so much"?

The birth control available to them _does not work_.

The figures quoted say otherwise. True, the worst contraceptive you mention is successful with 72% of users across a year never having a problem, however the pill is successful for 91% of users (over a year), and the CDC includes reversible birth control measures that are more than 99% effective in the chart you mention.

It's also worth mentioning that the failures aren't necessarily a function of the devices themselves so much as user error. Condoms usually "fail" not because they break or anything else obvious, but because people who rely upon them frequently decide to chance not using them. Almost all versions of the pill can be rendered useless if combined with certain drugs - notably many antibiotics - and are more than 99% effective if used properly.

Comment Re:massive parallel processing=limited application (Score 1) 107

On a 8-core machine, a processor will be placed into a wait queue roughly 7 out of 8 times that it needs access.

You just snuck into your analysis the assumption that every core is memory saturated, and I don't think that all the memory path aggregates in many designs until the L3 cache (usually L1 not shared, L2 perhaps shared a bit). The real bottleneck ends up being the cache coherency protocol, and cache snoop events, handled on a separate bus, which might even have concurrent request channels.

I think in Intel's Xeon E5 line-up there are single-ring and bridged double-ring SKUs for forwarding dirty cache lines from one cache to another (and perhaps all memory requests). This resource can also drown for many workloads.

In many systems, you have all these cores running tasks which are fairly well isolated (not much cache conflict), except they all want to be able to allocate as much memory as they need from a giant memory space (e.g. a TB of DRAM) so they fundamentally have to fall through to a shared memory allocation framework.

You can learn a lot about the challenges involved by following the winding path of something like jemalloc as increasing concurrency levels expose yet another degeneracy.

The real problem with this field is that there isn't a single, simple story like the one you tried to tell. There are usually dozens of ways to skin the cat, each with completely different scaling stories, with different sets of engineers who are good as tweaking or debugging those stories.

At this point, what you have is a fragile coordination problem between your solution space, your architecture, and the engineers you employ, forcing ambitious ventures to crack out the golden recipe: pour in seven cement mixers full of head hunters, one 55-gallon oil drum of exclamation marks, a metric butter tonne of job perks, and agitate appropriately.

Comment Re:massive parallel processing=limited application (Score 1) 107

Also, there is caching, and also, some loads are heavy on longish FPU operations.

So... it doesn't quite work out that way. Also, multicore designs can have separate memory.

One example of multicore design that's both interesting and functional are the various vector processor graphics cores. Lots of em in there; and they get to do a lot of useful work you couldn't really do any other way with similar clock speeds and process tech.

Comment Re: Democrats too (Score 1) 75

You can't even follow your own statements logically. You blamed the democrats, when it's clear the republicans are doing the same and probably much worse.

Reread his post. That's exactly what he said:

We've complained for years that the political elite is owned by the corporations, and that there's no difference between having a D or R after a candidate's name.

Don't blame corruption on just the Republicans, it's not intellectually honest and distracts people from the true problems.

Comment Re:"Some" data? (Score 1) 102

WhatsApp messages are end-to-end encrypted - or so they say, at least. I'm by no means an expert so I take their word for it, including it being unbreakable and WhatsApp not being able to read my messages while in transit and so.

Either there's no value in the data that Facebook has negotiated to pay lots of money for or the sentence above is just marketing (ie. lies). Facebook, after likely doing its due diligence, is betting on the former...

Comment Re:Democrats too (Score 2) 75

Here's cash flowing into the Clinton Foundation from corporations benefiting from selling dual use technology [nypost.com] (private and military uses) to Russia.

In case you haven't noticed, most of our "dual use" technology has been shared with the Russians for a long time already. For example, the decimal number system.

In some instances, we might even consider ourselves better off if the Russians did choose to adopt our technologies, such as fail-safe command and control systems responsible for nuclear weapons (supposing our technology is actually better; I suspect the Russians have had 8" floppy disk drives for quite a while already).

Just about any improvement in the Russian commercial space would probably trickle down to the Russian military (trickle down seems to work much better in some directions than others). Are we still in the middle of a 1950s-style total economic blockade? Not that I've heard. Our bigger technical battles are with countries who have not yet produced thousands of nuclear warheads.

In summary, all of this is all a lot of hand-wavy durf, durf, durf.

Point to a real technology and describe an actual scenario where the Russian military benefits, and then explain how the Russian benefit A) is a serious NATO concern, and B) wasn't going to happen anyway sooner rather than later. Having met that bar, then maybe this issue will start to seem important to people outside your particular Kool-Aid enclave.

Hint #1: you might need to avail yourself of sources other than wnd.

Hint #2: just about every dollar given to a politician comes from someone with an interest who wants something.

Arguably the Saudi's and their Wahhabist agenda have done more damage to American foreign interests over the last thirty years than anything the Russians have done. That line of thinking would probably lead you straight back to the Bush Foundation.

Bush's Newest Secret: Who's Funding His Library?

In this piece, Mother Jones at least displays the decency to tar the Democrats and the Republicans with the same brush.

Comment Re:Signed drivers? (Score 3, Funny) 256

So you're saying there's code in there along the lines of:

void usb_insertion_handler(string vendorid, string modelid, usbcontext context) {
. Driver d = DriverDB.find("usb/" + vendorid + "/" + modelid);

. if(d.signed()) {
. . d.load();
. . d.init(context);
. } else {
. . // alert("Driver not signed, device inserted in " + context.description + " cannot be used at this time"); -- 02/03/16 ska - not Microsofty enough

. . // Events.WriteEvent("usbsubsystem", "Driver unsigned, not loaded 0x80039193"); -- 02/10/16 jrh - good, those idiots will probably search for that number, sucks to be them when there's nothing on our website about it, hahahaha! -- 02/11/16 ska - not good enough, try again

. . System.BSOD(); // Crash, because clearly there's no better way to handle this problem
. }
}

Comment Take action (Score 5, Funny) 256

I'm probably not the only one here who's getting sick and tired of hearing about yet another major Windows bug that we can't do anything about. While Microsoft makes their operating system even less stable, update to update, it also makes it harder for us to even pick the updates that we know work and leave those we don't aside.

That's a serious problem, and downtime due to computers crashing, needing to be reformatted and their operating systems re-installed, together with the time taken for users to learn about these problems and investigate workarounds, costs the world economy trillions every year. In this case the user loses whatever functionality lead them to wanting to plug a Kindle Fire into their Windows PCs in the first place, again having a real cost associated with it.

Yet while we waste time waiting for our computers to reboot, we feel helpless, unable to investigate workarounds or other ways to achieve the results we want.

This quagmire of people being unable to fix the problems caused by bugs and other issues will not disappear by itself. Resources need to be devoted, and unless people are prepared to actually act, not just talk about it on Slashdot, nothing will ever get done. Apathy is not an option.

You can help by getting off your rear and writing to your congressman or senator. Tell them your concerns about bugs in Windows 10. Warn them that trillions of dollars are being lost because of these issues. Tell them this is important to you. Tell them that you appreciate the work being done by organizations like Microsoft and Amazon to fix the bugs, but that without better QA and more reliable drivers, you will be forced to use less and less secure and intelligently designed alternatives. Explain the concerns you have about freedom, openness, and choice, and how vicious, angry, arguments undermines all three. Let them know that this is an issue that effects YOU directly, that YOU vote, and that your vote will be influenced, indeed dependent, on their policies on bugs in Windows 10.

You CAN make a difference. Don't treat voting as a right, treat it as a duty. Remember, it was thanks to ordinary people like YOU that we are now seeing such innovations as SMP in OpenBSD. Keep informed, keep your political representatives informed on how you feel. And, most importantly of all, vote.

Comment Re:Solution: Buy legislators. All of them. (Score 1) 188

You cherry pick the bad ones.

Well, I cherry picked the high end devices, yes -- because they were sold claiming the feature sets that were compelling. Now, the fact that those feature sets were incomplete, and/or buggy, and/or mischaracterized... that's something I didn't pick. But it's been very consistent, and the higher end the device, the more consistent it's been.

It just sounds like you do business with shitty companies.

Well, Canon for the camera. Marantz for the pre-pro. Kenwood for the radio. I totally agree they are shitty companies. And they won't be getting any more of my money. It's not like I can't learn.

The bottom line is, these devices have, and were sold trumpeting, the mechanisms that would allow them to be fixed and/or improved. They aren't fixed, and they surely aren't improved in any significant way. I'm just reporting it, and drawing a general (and accurate) conclusion about considering "network upgradable" to be anything more than marketing hype.

You don't like what I'm saying, okay, more power to you. I'm still saying it, though. And I'm still right, so there's that. :)

Comment Re:So global warming started... (Score 1) 665

No, it started well after humans started adding significantly to the amount of CO2. But it wouldn't have been a surprise if it had started before the industrial revolution began, because humans were already pumping out huge amounts of CO2 for things like steel making. It's just that process accelerated 200-250 years ago as demand for steel increased and as we started using heat energy for machines.

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