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Comment Re:Docker is... (Score 1) 48

Some of your questions make more sense than others. In the context of deploying, docker looks a lot like a VM deployment - except instead of having to build up a VM using chef, and with all the luggage that usually entails, the docker image tends to only be running the service. Imagine a linux kernel with only one process running. So there aren't a lot of edges to harden. Usually the service image gets launched in something that looks like a DMZ behind a firewall with a loadbalancer in front of it.. In our case it's a little wild west.

But part of the joy/ease of docker is that you build on some particular image. It would be easy to imagine an organization that was more .. organized than ours specifying a few base image flavors that developers would have to build off of - then you could harden those images all you wanted. I don't know that I would be a big fan of that, however. You can see where redhat supplies a lot of images, for example (https://access.redhat.com/search/#/container-images).

Concrete (semi bogus) example: you want to run redis (maybe on windows - where it's not trivial). There is a redis docker image: https://hub.docker.com/_/redis...
"docker run -p 6379:6379 redis"
That will fire up a docker container running redis and will map the port on the image to the port on the docker host (usually localhost, these days). You can now connect to port 6379 and talk to redis. The container running redis is hard to describe - it's a full (stripped) linux system and it's only running that one process. You can fire up a shell on that container using another docker command and it has a bunch of the things you expect. Some shell (maybe bash or something lighter). Most of the filesystem stuff you expect. It's like a VM - if you built a VM to only run redis.

I don't know if any of this helps - it really is a weird concept - at least I had a really hard time wrapping my head around it. But I do love what I can do with it.

Comment Re:Docker is... (Score 4, Interesting) 48

Docker is a freeze dried VM with mappable ports and filesystem. It runs on several OSs on various platforms. I'm not sure what its killer feature is. It isn't just the ability to include libs with your program - it's a way to include the entire OS with your program - with all the libs and whatever else you need.

Things I do with docker:
* get rid of RVM/rbenv, NVM, and all those other version managers. Just fire up a docker container with the version of ruby/node/whaterver you want
* package up services for deployment (web apps in my case) and toss the image to devops/IT to deploy
* test tools/software I'm not familiar with - not sure if you want to install latest? fire up a docker container and take it for a spin. And when you're done testing, maybe just continue using the container.
* run things on platforms that don't support them. Want to run redis on windows? docker container. Want to run git hubflow on windows without installing extra stuff? docker container.

Comment WTF is Qubes? (Score 2) 73

https://www.qubes-os.org/ claims (tongue in cheek) to be "Reasonably secure." Really it loos like they are all about the security, so this is kind of a big deal for them.

https://www.qubes-os.org/tour/...
What is Qubes OS?
Qubes is a security-oriented operating system (OS). The OS is the software which runs all the other programs on a computer. Some examples of popular OSes are Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X, Android, and iOS. Qubes is free and open-source software (FOSS). This means that everyone is free to use, copy, and change the software in any way. It also means that the source code is openly available so others can contribute to and audit it.

Comment Re:Yet we can't build houses... (Score 4, Insightful) 152

You seem to have confused real estate with buildings. I don't think many folks would be surprised to hear that desirable real estate would continue to increase in value.

There are plenty of reasonably priced brand new homes in places you don't want to live. Telecommute or find an employer that doesn't insist on being located where a million folks want to be but there is only room for half that many.

Or wait a few years - the bubble will burst and start to blow up again.

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