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Comment Re:Will it work in a Raspberry Pi? (Score 1) 48

It will work in a Raspberry Pi, but the Pi doesn't have the required contacts to support UHS-II, so it won't benefit from the extra bus bandwidth. And it doesn't even support UHS-I fully (max speed is 100 MHz instead of 200 MHz) because you apparently can't put the SoC into 1.8V signalling mode (or so I've read). So you'll presumably benefit from improvements to random access time from the faster microcontroller on the SD card, but you won't get the full speed benefit.

Comment Re:TechBros are the worst Consumers (Score 1) 125

The challenge, of course, is defining what "deprive others of that freedom" means. Does it mean you can't deprive other people of the freedom to have the source code to your work that extends the original work, or does it mean you can't deprive other people of the freedom to make private extensions to the original work? That's fundamentally the difference between the GPL and BSD licensees is what other group of people you want to deprive of freedom.

Arguably, the BSD license is more free because the existence of a private fork doesn't deprive anyone of anything; the original work is still freely available. But on the other hand, you could argue that some of those changes merely fix bugs, and thus are not rightfully new works, and should be available to anyone who has the original software. It's a fine line, and there's no absolute right answer.

The reason the public mocks nerds, of course, is that they argue vociferously over which license is correct, which takes time away from actually making the technology better, and is often seen as a waste of everyone's time. On the other hand, without those arguments (which expand the community's understanding of the licenses and their eccentricities), there's a possibility of critical projects choosing a license that is inappropriate and ending up stuck with it to the detriment of everyone.

For example, the FSF's decision to relicense GCC under GPLv3 created stagnation in its largest user base (the Mac community), with OS X users stuck at a much older version for years, until eventually Apple worked with the LLVM team to replace it with Clang. To be fair, in the end, everybody benefitted from a more modular compiler architecture that could better be integrated into things like IDEs, so the resulting platform is more capable than GCC ever was (or ever will be, in all likelihood), but the bad licensing decision meant that the teams couldn't take advantage of each other's work, which no doubt made that transition take much longer than it otherwise would have and resulted in a lot of duplication of work, ultimately culminating in GCC becoming an evolutionary dead end that's still a giant time sink to maintain (and that, no doubt, will continue to be maintained for many years, for no real reason other than because it exists and has to work).

So in spite of the public's belief that this is all a bunch of silly squabbles like Star Wars versus Star Trek, the reality is that there are real-world implications of these arguments, making them at least somewhat valuable (up to a point, anyway).

Comment Re:All you Apple Haters can bite my shiny metal SD (Score 1) 48

I seem to recall an awful lot of Apple Haters whining about a certain new MacBook Pro that had dropped the built in SD reader...

We were complaining about the lack of UHS-II support for about five years before they dropped it. Apple dropping it rather than updating it wasn't the first snub, but rather the last straw.

Comment Re:An allegation has been made. (Score 1) 902

I'm expecting that whoever does this investigation is going to act in the shareholders' best interest, which among other things means not exposing the company to massive liabilities in court. If the investigation supports the allegations, then those responsible are going to get canned.

-jcr

Comment Re:Prime is starting to suck (Score 1) 183

Actually, what I would do is check with the carrier, and if it claims to be delivered but isn't, contact Amazon and ask them to overnight a replacement. They'll usually overnight products at no charge if you're annoyed enough to write them to complain about shipping delays even if you're not a Prime member.

Comment An allegation has been made. (Score 5, Insightful) 902

And it appears that Uber is investigating said allegation. We don't have enough information to know whether it happened or not. That's what investigations are for.

After the Duke Lacross Lynching and the UVA rape hoax, I'm inclined to reserve judgement until an accusation becomes a lawsuit and is litigated.

-jcr

Comment Re:The border exception is a usurpation. (Score 1) 510

The Supreme Court has held that the Constitution only applies to U.S. territory.

Yeah, and they fucked up Korematsu, Dred Scott and Kelo too. What's your point?

Technically it is Cuban territory being leased to the U.S.

Which is irrelevant to the bill of rights. The fifth amendment doesn't say "unless you stash the people you kidnapped on foreign soil". For any American official to hold anyone in custody without trial is a crime.

all countries need to protect themselves from unlawful entry

This is a reason for positively identifying anyone seeking entry. It's not an argument for violating their 4th amendment rights.

-jcr

Comment The border exception is a usurpation. (Score 3, Interesting) 510

The US Constitution is the entirety of the legal basis for the very existence of the American federal government. Is it binding upon all American government officials, agents, and employees at all times and all places. There is no provision in the constitution for the suspension of the bill of rights at the border, and the fact that our rights are routinely violated when entering the country is because our courts are derelict in their duty to enforce the constitution.

-jcr

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