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Submission + - CNET parent organization blocks review and award to Dish over legal dispute (cnn.com)

Coldeagle writes: It looks as if CNET's parent company, CBS, has laid down the law:

Just one day after CNet named the Dish "Hopper," a new TV recording system that's drawing rave reviews in the tech press, to an awards shortlist, the site's parent company stepped in and nixed the accolade. Because of a legal battle between CBS and Dish over the Hopper's ad-skipping technology, CBS laid down a ban: CNet won't be allowed to even review Dish products, much less give them awards.

Got to love modern day freedom of the press!

China

Submission + - Chinese Smartphone Invasion Begins (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "Tech giants Apple, Google, and Microsoft were no-shows at CES this week in Las Vegas, which worked out just fine for Chinese vendors looking to establish a name for themselves with U.S. consumers, InfoWorld reports. 'Telecom suppliers Huawei and ZTE, in particular, have set their sights on breaking into the U.S. market for smartphones and tablets. ... Whether these Chinese imports can take on the likes of Apple and Samsung remains to be seen, but as Wired quotes Jeff Lotman, the CEO of Global Icons, an agency that helps companies build and license their brands: "The thing that's amazing is these are huge companies, and they have a lot of power, but in the United States nobody has heard of them and they're having trouble gaining traction, but it's not impossible. Samsung was once known for making crappy, low-end phones and cheap TVs. Now they're seen as a top TV and smartphone brand."'"
Programming

Submission + - Who Controls Vert.x: Red Hat, VMware, Neither? (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "Simon Phipps sheds light on a fight for control over Vert.x, an open source project for scalable Web development that 'seems immunized to corporate control.' 'Vert.x is an asynchronous, event-driven open source framework running on the JVM. It supports the most popular Web programming languages, including Java, JavaScript, Groovy, Ruby, and Python. It's getting lots of attention, though not necessarily for the right reasons. A developer by the name of Tim Fox, who worked at VMware until recently, led the Vert.x project — before VMware's lawyers forced him to hand over the Vert.x domain, blog, and Google Group. Ironically, the publicity around this action has helped introduce a great technology with an important future to the world. The dustup also illustrates how corporate politics works in the age of open source: As corporate giants grasp for control, community foresight ensures the open development of innovative technology carries on.'"
Java

Submission + - Apple, Mozilla Block Vulnerable Java Plug-ins (paritynews.com)

hypnosec writes: Following news that the Java 0-day has been rolled into exploit kits and non-availability of any patch to fix the vulnerability, Mozilla and Apple have blocked the latest versions of Java on Firefox and Mac OS X respectively. Mozilla has taken steps to protect its user base from the yet unpatched vulnerability. Mozilla has added to its Firefox add-on block-list Java 7 Update 10, Java 7 Update 9, Java 6 Update 38 and Java 6 Update 37. Similar steps have also been taken by Apple whereby it has updated its anti-malware system to only allow version 1.7.10.19 or higher thereby automatically blocking the vulnerable version 1.7.10.18.

Submission + - Can Open Compute Transform Government Data Centers? (datacenterknowledge.com)

1sockchuck writes: It just got easier for government agencies to use Facebook’s data center designs if they choose. Hyve, which makes servers and storage solutions based on Open Compute designs, has qualified as a government vendor under GSA Schedule 70, making it easier to win government contracts. The Open Compute Project was launched in April 2011 to publish server and data center designs developed by Facebook and has been slowly gaining traction among large users. But can open hardware work in government agencies?
The Internet

Submission + - IPv6 can boost mobile performance, battery life, proponents say (networkworld.com)

alphadogg writes: IPv6, the new version of the Internet Protocol, could make life easier and battery life longer for electronics-addicted consumers.
Much of the push for IPv6 has been focused on the requirements of enterprises and the challenges they face in making the transition from the current protocol, IPv4. If device makers and service providers do their jobs right, consumers won't even know it when they start using IPv6, but they do stand to benefit, proponents of IPv6 said in a panel discussion at International CES on Thursday. Among other things, accessing sites and content over the Internet is usually faster with IPv6 than with IPv4 because with the new protocol it requires fewer "hops" between network nodes. Many popular smartphones, including the latest iPhones, Samsung Galaxy phones and Windows phones, support IPv6.

Submission + - New island appears off coast of Germany (telegraph.co.uk) 4

quantumghost writes: Despite its youthful age the sickle-shaped island lying 16 miles off the coast of the German state of Schleswig Holstein is already home to around 50 different plant species and proved popular with sea birds such as herring gulls and oyster catchers, eager to take advantage of its unspoilt and pristine environment.

Formed over just 10 years, the rapid appearance of the island has surprised scientists familiar with the strong winds and shifting shifts that characterise Germany's North Sea coast.

Hardware

Submission + - Micron develops stick of gum-sized 480GB SSD for Ultrabooks (geek.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Micron and Crucial have teamed up to not only release the first 960GB SSD for under $600, but they've also managed to cram 480GB on to an SSD the size of a stick of gum while maintaining 500MB/s and 400MB.s read and write speeds respectively. That's sure to make them a tempting proposition for Ultrabook and even tablet manufacturers this year.

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