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Submission + - Tech startup claims to spot potential criminals based on facial structure (washingtonpost.com) 2

neanderslob writes: Tech startup Faception has developed technology that it claims can detect potential criminals based on the structure of their face. The new company claims to have developed 15 different classifiers that evaluate common personality traits with 80% accuracy. The technology is based on the idea that genes that govern our facial structure correlate with certain personality traits. Faception further states that it has signed a contract with a homeland security agency to help identify terrorists.

Submission + - SPAM: Cleaver Email Scam

An anonymous reader writes: I work for a small Managed Services Provider and we had a client come across a rather interesting SCAM. The user received an email from her boss while he was out of town. It was asking her to arrange for a $20K fund transfer to an account. She even emailed back and forth with the scammer. She was about to act on the request when she noticed the email address. Instead of xxxxindustries.xxx it was xxxxlndustries.xxx with a little L not an I. We filtered out that domain and she then got another email from xxxxindustles.xxx ( lies not ies)asking how the transfer was coming. It is the first time we have seen a working email address like this in a scam. How do you create a working email for 2 unregistered domains?

Submission + - Apparently Slashdot Mobile Pushed Malvertising Back In January (softpedia.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Crooks used malicious ads (malvertising) to push a fake Android Marshmallow update to Android users accessing a series of high-profile news sites. The malicious ads were found on the mobile versions of reputable sites such as Slashdot and Android Police, but also on local news sites in France (20 Minutes) and Germany (SPON).

This campaign was unique compared to other mobile malvertising waves because it used a never seen before trick which auto-downloaded the fake Android 6.0 upgrade package on the devices without any kind of user interaction.

Submission + - OpenWrt Fork Promises Greater Openness (hackerboards.com)

DeviceGuru writes: The ubiquitous, router-oriented, lightweight OpenWRT embedded Linux distribution is being forked by some of OpenWRT's core developers into a new Linux Embedded Development Environment (LEDE) distribution. The new distro's goal is to provide greater transparency, inclusiveness, and decentralization than the current OpenWrt project. The LEDE project is billed as both a 'reboot' and 'spinoff' distro that will make it 'easy for developers, system administrators, or other Linux enthusiasts to build and customize software for embedded devices, especially wireless routers,' according to the group. The ELEC announcement, which was signed by Jo-Philipp Wich and six other former OpenWrt core members, claims that LEDE represents a significant share of the most active members of the OpenWrt community.

Submission + - Unity 8 and Snaps Are Conquering the Ubuntu Desktop After Ubuntu 16.10

prisoninmate writes: Today is the last day of the Ubuntu Online Summit 2016, and the Ubuntu developers discussed the future of the Ubuntu Desktop for Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) and beyond, and it looks like Snaps (Snappy) and Unity 8 with Mir are slowly conquering the Ubuntu Desktop, at least according to Canonical's Will Cooke, Ubuntu Desktop Manager. Work has already begun on pushing these new and modern technologies to the Ubuntu Desktop, as Ubuntu 16.04 LTS has just received support for installing Snaps from the Ubuntu Snappy Store. Canonical's Will Cooke has mentioned the fact that the Unity 7 desktop enters its twilight years, which means that it gets fewer features and it's being reduced to only critical and OEM work. This is because Unity 8 desktop is getting all the attention now, and it will become the default desktop session somewhere after Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak).

Submission + - Apple Patches Vulnerable OS X Git Version That Put Developers At Risk (csoonline.com)

itwbennett writes: Apple has released a new version of its Xcode development tool in order to patch two critical remote code execution flaws in the Git source code management client that have been known since mid-March. The version of Git shipped with the command line tools package has now been updated to 2.7.4. This version was released by the Git developers on March 17, but it took Apple a month and a half to integrate into Xcode.

Submission + - The best (nerd-) smartphone?

jandersen writes: I have resisted getting a smartphone for many years for a number of reasons — to me, a phone should be for making calls, mainly, and perhaps have a phonebook and a calendar, and in most smartphones those functions seem to have become poorer. However, if I were to buy one, I would want it to be a proper nerdphone, with full root-access (preferably without needing to flash it), ample, builtin memory, a good GPS chip and a free development kit, which probably means Android. What are the recommendations?

Submission + - Australian entrepreneur says that he IS bitcoin's inventor (yahoo.com)

Faizdog writes: Australian entrepreneur Craig Wright says he's the inventor of the digital currency bitcoin; Wright told the BBC that he is Satoshi Nakamoto, the shadowy creator of the cryptocurrency, in a move that could end the years-long search for the inventor.

To prove his claim, Wright digitally signed a message using the cryptographic keys that were associated with the creator and was backed up by experts.

  Jon Matonis, co-founder of the nonprofit Bitcoin Foundation, said he believed Wright's claims after seeing the same demonstration.

"During the London proof sessions, I had the opportunity to review the relevant data along three distinct lines: cryptographic, social, and technical. Based on what I witnessed, it is my firm belief that Craig Steven Wright satisfies all three categories," Matonis wrote in a blog post on Monday.

"The social evidence, including his unique personality, early emails that I received, and early drafts of the Bitcoin white paper, points to Craig as the creator. I also received satisfactory explanations to my questions about registering the bitcoin.org domain and the various time-of-day postings to the BitcoinTalk forum. Additionally, Craig's technical working knowledge of public key cryptography, Bitcoin's addressing system, and proof-of-work consensus in a distributed peer-to-peer environment is very strong."

Submission + - Craig Wright revealed as Bitcoin creator Satoshi Nakamoto 1

mrspoonsi writes: Australian entrepreneur Craig Wright has publicly identified himself as Bitcoin creator Satoshi Nakamoto. His admission ends years of speculation about who came up with the original ideas underlying the digital cash system. Mr Wright has provided technical proof to back up his claim using coins known to be owned by Bitcoin's creator. Prominent members of the Bitcoin community and its core development team have also confirmed Mr Wright's claim.

Submission + - The government wants your fingerprint to unlock your phone (latimes.com)

schwit1 writes: As the world watched the FBI spar with Apple this winter in an attempt to hack into a San Bernardino shooter's iPhone, federal officials were quietly waging a different encryption battle in a Los Angeles courtroom.

There, authorities obtained a search warrant compelling the girlfriend of an alleged Armenian gang member to press her finger against an iPhone that had been seized from a Glendale home. The phone contained Apple's fingerprint identification system for unlocking, and prosecutors wanted access to the data inside it.

It marked a rare time that prosecutors have demanded a person provide a fingerprint to open a computer, but experts expect such cases to become more common as cracking digital security becomes a larger part of law enforcement work.

The Glendale case and others like it are forcing courts to address a basic question: How far can the government go to obtain biometric markers such as fingerprints and hair?

Comment Re:Maybe not trademarked by iCloud Communcations (Score 1) 394

They don't have a TRADEmark, just some mark. I read it also on macrumors.com but I can't find the article now..

That's the (awesome) point: they sue Apple because they have a name and a logo! I think if your business is so tightly connected with your name, you should *at least* bother to trademark it, not just have someone design you a logo (unless you're used to it in USA, I hope not)

Comment Re:Nonsense (Score 1) 577

Mac OS X's future is on high end workstations, targeting the professional and power user markets. Apple's consumer strategy will be centered on iOS.

+1

Don't think they just spent countless man hours to develop a brand new Final Cut suite to throw away it all some weeks later. iOS for the win, but on *lower* devices, the most advanced Unix-based S.O. on *higher* devices. From a certain point of view *everything* is a device.

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