Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Compare cell phone plans using Wirefly's innovative plan comparison tool ×

Comment Re:What event? (Score 1) 526

The worst confidential info "scandal" was when she gave the order to send talking points for the day...

So, you either don't actually know what SAP material is (in which case you're being willfully ignorant on this topic and should stop expressing opinions until you read up on it), or you DO know, and you're just being another liar in the service of a liar.

Comment Re:How hard is it to find emails? (Score 1) 526

Yeah, because the FBI knows nothing about gathering information, amirite?

The FBI can only gather what's given to them, or what can be forensically recovered. If she blew away 30,000 emails, and they've got under 20,000 of them to look at, there's some they couldn't get. It's not really very complicated.

Comment Re:What event? (Score 2) 526

seriously. What event? Aside from the scandal itself what, exactly, did Hilary do that was a) a criminal offense and b) revealed in the emails?

The emails revealed that she was incredibly reckless in handling classified information - some of it SAP-level stuff so sensitive that it can't even be talked about when it's 100% redacted, content-wise. People lose their careers and their liberty over such carelessness. And we're now seeing evidence of pervasive corruption as her family was enriched while their family business sold access to her while she was in office. So, you're either simply not paying attention or (more likely) you know all of this and are a Shillary.

While I'm on it, which is it? Is she a fool who couldn't run an email server or a Machiavellian genius who successfully evaded the FBI and an entire political party's attempts to bring her to justice?

False dichotomy.

She's had a long career of throwing underlings under the bus or having her party cover for Clinton Machine mis-steps. So yes, incompetence (but mostly arrogance). And no, she hasn't evaded the FBI or congress ... she's still hip deep in the mess she created.

Comment Re:How hard is it to find emails? (Score 5, Informative) 526

Her team did not "delete" emails -- that is a deliberately misleading term.

Yes, they did delete them. They even SAID they deleted them. That the server that had contained them had had all of its contents destroyed once they were done picking out the stuff that was work related.

What *actually* happened is they used discovery software to filter emails based on keywords.

But the lie she told was that her lawyers read each and every email. She knew that wasn't true, and so was lying. But that's OK, because her supporters know she lies to them, and they like being lied to.

People should really appreciate the amount of effort the FBI put into looking for malfeasance.

People should also recognize that they FBI could only look for corruption (and worse) within the material they had available. Clinton did not provide all of the requested material. She said she did, but that was another lie. Not an oversight, but a lie. Because we're not talking about "oops, a couple of emails you should have seen slipped through the cracks" - but "oops, thousands and thousands of emails you should have seen in that pile I printed out without header info were deleted."

In short: this fantasy that Hillary attempted to delete evidence is completely without basis

Other than the part where, you know, her records were deleted after her team put on a show of pulling out what they thought would make the appearance of complying with her requirements ... years after she was supposed to have turned ALL of it over to State so their archivists could make the distinction between personal and work-related records from her deliberately co-mingled collection.

What she *has* done is tried to *misrepresent*, the most egregious being her assertion that Comey agrees with her.

That was egregious, but it's hardly the worst of it. She knowingly, willingly, and repeatedly lied about her motivations and actions, and deliberately slow-walked and stonewalled at every turn. The fact that she'd whip up yet another lie to make it sound like the FBI's very clear identification of her multiple "untruths" on the matter is only egregious because it shows that she's still willing to lie even when she knows that we all know she's doing it. None of that matters, of course. Her supporters like that she lies, and none of that is legally meaningful. What IS legally meaningful is her testimony in front of congress. She spent long hours carefully avoiding direct answers to questions to she wouldn't perjure herself. We'll see if she's still as slippery on that front as her reputation suggests.

Separate from all of that, of course, is the actual content of the messages now being read. They exhibit a very clear pattern of tying access to her and her policy influence to being willing to dump piles of cash into her family business while she was in office. Legal jeopardy there? Hard to say. That would once again be Loretta Lynch's call, and we already know where she stands.

Comment Appraisals (Score 4, Interesting) 526

The people at State who have to appraise this material are the ones she was supposed to turn ALL of her co-mingled material over to on the day she left office. State's archivists are the ones who are supposed to weed through and figure out what's personal and what's not when someone in her role chooses to make everything personal. If she'd actually followed the rules and delivered all of it to them years ago as she was supposed to, she could have spent a solid year or two talking down all of the conflicts of interest and signs of corruption between her family business and access to her and her power as SoS and have Clinton-ed most of it into "the past" by now. She's got only herself to blame for deliberately ignoring her departure requirements, and then for slow-walking and hiding all of this stuff until it had to be pried out by the damn FBI and through suits pointing out FOIA shenanigans.

State will now say that it will take until next year to review this new material - plenty of time to stonewall and foot-drag past November. Her supporters are still running around claiming she hasn't once lied about any of this, and that nothing inappropriate to a private home-based mail server ever passed through her hands, despite the FBI pointing out the opposite.

Comment Re:Third choice (Score 1) 275

Easy enough to say but last time I checked if you want to do anything with the current VR headset boom, you're pretty much going to have to use Windows. Steam's OpenVR initiative makes it sound like you don't, but a few months ago when I checked their Linux examples wouldn't even build.

Comment Re:Meh (Score 1) 179

Is there every any particular need to limit them, though? A couple decades ago it was uncommon to have more than one sound device on a machine. Now it's unusual not to have two or three. Designs and requirements change over time, and having to factor out singleton behavior that was never really necessary in the first place is kind of a pain in the ass. You could easily just create those things with thing factories when the program starts up, and pass them around to objects that need them. No artificial limits, and you don't have to factor out singleton behavior when you decide you want two things where you used to only have one.

I've found that design review boards are becoming increasingly hostile toward singletons, too. There was a narrow window where they'd at least consider one, back when people started talking about design patterns. These days it's next to impossible to get one approved, even if there's pretty good justification for it. You can always design around the need for a singleton, and usually the system design will be better without them.

Comment Meh (Score 5, Interesting) 179

I've yet to see a computer science professor with particularly excellent code, either. I run across assignments and example code from courses on a regular basis that fall into the "Never, ever do that" category of programming. Case in point, a relative of mine recently had some questions about a CS programming assignment. Part of the assignment description talked about design patterns and predictably went straight for the Singleton as an example. I'm pretty sure that's the only pattern that about 90% of programmers ever actually learn when reading about design patterns and it's so abused in the industry right now that you can basically never get one past a design review board.

Anywhoo, back in the '90's I worked for a company that was getting a B2 Certification for its operating system. My job basically consisted of reading the entire AT&T C standard library code, finding potential security flaws, writing tests for those flaws and then writing a report with the tests which would be delivered to the NSA. I found the remote buffer overflow in the AT&T telnet daemon a couple years before the same overflow was discovered in the Linux telnet daemon. So the NSA basically outsourced the hard work of finding all those exploits to the companies that were trying to get security certifications. It took three or four guys just a few months to go through all the stuff we had to look at. I'm sure we missed a bit, but I was much more confident in the security of their OS at the end of all that. Too bad they eventually went out of business, were acquired by IBM and their products were killed. You know, progress!

Comment Re: Curse(d) (Score 1) 25

I quit when pandas started roaming Azeroth. What was Bliz even thinking?

But after that I went to a private server to try older expansions and it was a lot of fun at first but the experience became altogether corrosive.

These days I really enjoy Path of Exile, but it would have no use for Curse apart from the wiki for reading content about the game.

Having a company thrive from curating game information frees up game developers to put their time in the game itself and leave the understanding of mechanics to a third party.

This is a double edged sword I think. It would be better for games companies to do it themselves, however the promotion of the game then also gets spearheaded by the third parties to drive their interests further.

Comment Re: Curse(d) (Score 2) 25

If you use a game that has a lot of mods like World of Warcraft, Curse updates your mods when they release new patches and it's a pretty big hassle. However, if you run backdated mods then you can't necessarily configure Curse not to overwrite your old folders. It would have been pretty easy to write an ignore folder feature but Curse refused to bother when I was using it a long time ago.

Other than that, you pay a premium to have a nice forum avatar from what I can tell.

Slashdot Top Deals

"Morality is one thing. Ratings are everything." - A Network 23 executive on "Max Headroom"

Working...