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Submission + - How Half Of America Lost Its F**king Mind

tippen writes: "It feels good to dismiss people, to mock them, to write them off as deplorables. But you might as well take time to try to understand them, because I'm telling you, they'll still be around long after Trump is gone."

While there are many, many reasons I'm glad Hillary lost the election, there was no way I was going to vote for Trump. But for all that I don't think much of the man, it is a mistake to assume everyone that voted for him is some sort of <insert your favorite most-hated type of "deplorable" here>.

If you are ready to move beyond hurling expletives or curling up in the fetal position asking "why?!", it's worth taking the time to read How Half Of America Lost Its F**king Mind on Cracked. Yeah, that's right... A surprisingly insightful article on Cracked.

I know this is /., but for once, just RTFA

Submission + - "Shit I cannot believe we had to fucking write this month" (wikipedia.org)

The ed17 writes: Stories from people filling Wikipedia's gender gap: "This month in systemic bias, we had to write a whole bunch of shit that should have been written forever ago and generally made the world a better place. Go read these articles and learn about some badass people."

Submission + - Turns out the Periodic Table is a perfect Quantum Truth Table (hackaday.com)

szczys writes: Here's a chance to actually apply some of that Quantum Mechanics theory to something you'll understand. Will Sweatman walks through the four quantum numbers and how they are represented. It's just an abstract set of simple rules until you start trying all combinations. The resulting truth table — the set of every iteration — justifies the elements and their locations on the periodic table.

Submission + - Lessig's Equal Citizens: "Why we need technical people to take on corruption" (medium.com)

Funksaw writes: An article in "Equal Citizens," Lawrence Lessig's Medium-based blog dealing with issues of institutional corruption in democratic politics, explains why, specifically, the reform movement needs (more) people with technical minds and technical skills.

FTA: "What we need are more people willing to look at the laws of this country based on their function. And when I use the word “function,” I mean very specifically the same sense that a computer programmer means it. (Because lord knows, government isn’t functioning by any other definition.)...

It’s not just that big money politics is being injected [like a code injection] into the function of democracy. It’s also that the function of democracy can be warped by an injection. Stopping the injection of money into our democratic function still leaves the function vulnerable to the same—or similar—injection attack.... We need people who can solve the problems of politics like a programmer solves problems in computer code, because a democratic system with vulnerabilities is a democratic system that can fail or be made to fail.
"

The article was authored by the technical adviser to the New Hampshire Rebellion and Mayday.US, two of Lessig's major reform projects.

Google

Microsoft Claims Google Chrome Steals Your Privacy 522

An anonymous reader writes "Microsoft is going on the offensive against Google, accusing the search giant of creating a browser that does not respect user privacy. The company posted a video, embedded below, on TechNet Edge with the following description: 'Watch a demo on how Google Chrome collects every keystroke you make and how Internet Explorer 8 keeps your information private through two address bars and In Private browsing.' Microsoft's first criticism is Chrome's combining the address bar and the search box into a single entry box; IE8 keeps those fields separate. 'By keeping these boxes separate, your privacy is better protected and the addresses of the sites you're visiting aren't automatically shared with Microsoft, or anyone else,' says IE product manager Pete LePage."

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