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Comment 13 times less? (Score 1) 131

What are we supposed to infer from this?

engineers in India's tech hub cost 13 times less than their Silicon Valley counterparts

So, the engineers in Silicon Valley cost less than somewhere else, but the ones in India are thirteen times MORE less expensive than the ones in SV? Or are we supposed to gather that the SV engineers cost something that we should all consider a good baseline, but that the Indian engineers cost roughly 8% of that amount?

Lazy writers, being lazy.

Comment Re:Yeah, nah. (Score 1) 325

Here it works where I am. I pump, I end pumping, I go inside and I pay.

Pay-after-you-pump disappeared from the US sometime in the '80s: it was still here when we left in 1984, but was pretty much gone by the time we returned in 1988. Paying cash before you pump an unknown quantity of gas is a pain in the ass as a result. Even if you just want $20 worth of gas and know it's not going to be a fill-up, you're still wasting time going inside unless you happen to need something more than just gas (and if I need to go inside for something, I do that after filling up and moving to a parking space to free up the pump for someone else).

Comment Re:Intel is blowing (Score 1) 80

I prefer Samsung's RAPID mode myself. Up to 1GB of RAM used as read-cache, though no write-back caching to ensure protection of data (not everyone has a UPS on their desktop, and most RAID cards have a lithium battery onboard to assist against write-back caching data loss). It's fast, and will scale back if more system resources are needed by the OS and apps; though that's only an issue for systems with 4GB of ram, and 8GB in rare cases. Did I mention it's FAST!?. Can't execute anything faster than DDR4 at the moment on a desktop :)

Intel can suck my fat one.

Comment Re:The good ones (Score 0) 131

The US is bankrupt; just cutting to the chase of it all. In essence, oversupply of labor (in any field) puts deflationary pressure on value. Here in the US, the government is printing money to support an employed workforce. Meanwhile, the Indian and Hispanic birthrate is outstripping demand, so expect the wages to drop further in the global IT market.

Deflation, marked with inflation = FUCKED!

What's the answer? There is none. But what can not going on forever, wont; and you can take that to the bank.

I recon WW3 to be honest. It's not want I want, but historically strife leads to war; so there you have it.

Comment Re:Typical of America. It always belittles... (Score 1) 131

Needless to say, he returned to our company as a consultant on some project that had incurred budgetary overruns and incompetency.

All at the hands of our so-called American trained "engineers."

I can't speak to the specifics of this situation but I have seen others where the desires of in-house personnel were ignored but when the same initiatives are suggested by a consultant, they're followed with gusto.

Don't blame the engineers, blame the management.

LK

Comment Re:This is why i didn't buy day 1 (Score 1) 90

How many times did the XBOX get recalled and redesigned to address the RROD? How many times did Sony address the CD lens issue in the PS1 and PS3? I'll grant you that the NES was long overdue for a product revision due to a design flaw in the cartridge slot, but I still stand behind my original statement of this predominantly being a Gen5 to Gen6 issue.

Comment Re:Yeah, nah. (Score 4, Insightful) 325

I pay cash at the filling station, at the grocery store, at restaurants, and more. Why? Because it tends to be faster. While others are waiting for their card to clear through the computer I've got my change and I'm gone.

On what planet do you live? How is going inside, waiting in line, paying for gas, pumping it, and going back inside and waiting again for your change faster than just swiping your card at the pump (or holding your phone up to the NFC reader), pumping your gas, and hanging the nozzle back up when you're done? For the others, you're trusting that the people involved can do basic arithmetic quickly enough and accurately enough to get your change right in a timely manner. On the occasions that I do pay cash, if I hand over $4.10 instead of $4.00 for a $3.85 purchase, maybe half the time I get a blank stare in return. Hand them plastic and you don't burden their feeble minds with having to make sense of that.

There are plenty of good reasons to hang onto cash, but transaction speed isn't one of them.

Comment Re: Why the media blitz over this? (Score 1) 285

Simple solution: The snowflakes should become unemployed.

In considerable measure, they already are not just unemployed, but unemployable. Think about it: for what work is your average women's studies graduate qualified, beyond asking if you'd like fries with that? Even that's asking too much of them, given the likelihood they'd spit in your burger if they accused you of directing your "male gaze" at them for so much as a microsecond.

Comment Re:Yeah, real "terrifying" (Score 1) 192

Kitchen knife use case #1: Kill insufficiently Muslim heathens working for the oppressive British Government! (this use case was seen just the other day)

Kitchen knife use case #2: Make a sandwich. (this use case also seen just the other day)

Maybe you don't have the problem. But, for example, a city here in our state has been known to have a problem with "protesters" deciding that they're going to fix the problems with the culture in their local neighborhood by smashing the few remaining businesses in that neighborhood and burning the houses of the few little old ladies who haven't already decided they'd be safer living elsewhere as a homeless street person than in the middle of place like that.

The cops are too scared to even attempt to mitigate all of that violence and destruction unless they have function physical protection while trying to push a mob of looting arsonists away from the stores they're trying to destory. A tool that helps them to do that is a good thing. If somebody has a problem with the fact that a politician with the wrong idea about things might use such a tool to chase away people who aren't being violent and destructive, then they need to vote for different politicians. In the meantime, recognize the fact that there actually ARE violent, destructive herds of "protesters" who actually do get together to destroy and smash and steal things, and that it's absurd to tell a police officer to risk being, say, burned alive or having her head caved in to try to repel looters. A tool is a tool. There are always going to be outlandish or absurd use cases. If there is NO good use case (say... police batons with spikes on them?) then of course the tool is worth ridiculing. Giving cops a tool to protect themselves while preserving others' lives and property is a good thing. Misusing it is a bad thing, but that's true of cop cars and every other tool they've always had.

Comment Re:Uhm... (Score 1) 520

Documents 6 bankruptcies, and 13 businesses that closed up shop - at the very least suggests he doesn't know what he's doing.

Business has something in common with war and engineering:
  1 You try a bunch of stuff that looks like it might work.
  2 Some of it works, some of it doesn't.
  3a. You stop doing (and wasting resources on) what doesn't work
  3b, and continue doing more of what does (transferring any remaining resources from the abandoned paths.)
  4. PROFIT!

In business, step 3a is called "a large business environment, major projects are done in separate subsidiary corporations. This uses the "corporate veil" as a firewall, to keep the failed attempts from reaching back and sucking up more resources from what's succeeding. Dropping a failed experiment in step 3a (when it's failed so badly that there's nothing left to salvage in a different attempt's 3b) is called "bankruptcy". It lets you stop throwing good money after bad and move on.

So bankruptcy is NOT necessarily a sign of weakness, stupidity, or lack of business acumen. On the contrary: It shows the decision-maker was smart enough to spend a bit extra to erect the firewall between the bulk of his holdings and the iffy project.

So a successful large-business-empire-operator who is also innovative will usually have a number of bankruptcies in his history. It's no big deal, anyone in business at or near that level knows it, and took it into account if they risked some of their resources in someone else's experiment that failed in the hope of profit if it succeeded.

Also: Someone starting out may have to few resources to run many experiments simultaneously. (Or even a big guy may be reduced to a little guy by too many failures - not necessarily his fault.) So he has to try serially, doing only one or a few at a time. This may mean total bankruptcy, even multiple times, before coming up with something that does work. Lots of successful businessmen went through total bankruptcy, sometimes several times, before hitting it big.

Comment Re:Take whoever came up with this (Score 0) 149

Well, you're just wrong. I've personally watched inventory shrinkage drop into the measurement noise with the introduction of technology-based tools that catch the people who steal - because other employees understand there are consequences.

Yes, it's a shame that throughout all of human history and in every level of society and income, some people like to steal stuff. Someone who is trying to make a living running a business and who has to make payroll every week and keep customers happy won't usually have a lot of luck changing human nature. Now, I know that you've personally solved these human nature problems in your own area, and no longer feel any need to lock your doors or in any way look after your personal safety, because you've fixed everybody that you might encounter or who might want your stuff.

Yes, people stealing things IS a problem. And taking measures to stop it from happening to you isn't irrational. Yes, more parents should raise kids that have some sort of moral compass and which are educated and motivated enough to go out and create things so that they can trade the fruit of their labors for the stuff they want, instead of stealing it. Your notion that it's wrong-headed to use convenient tools to help deal with the fact that there are lots of people out there who DO find it easier (or even, in some cases, more entertaining) to steal stuff than buy it - never mind, I realize that you're trolling. Silly me.

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