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Comment Re:rightist philosophies of selfishness (Score 0) 553

Could be, but it could have been one of the less-expensive ones, too. We may never know which one was left out here.

My mother until recently took an "orphan drug", which was expensive but was the only treatment for her condition that did not cause her horrible side effects. The manufacturer now has stopped making the drug at all, so she is SOL. I told her it certainly sucks for her, but kind of proves that health care isn't a right.

I fully expect family of the woman in the story to file a wrongful lawsuit against the 4th company (which did not provide her free drugs). And fully expect that they'd do the same had none of the above happened, but the company decided to stop manufacturing the drug.

http://www.healthline.com/heal... cost-epilepsy-medications#Prices2

The following prices are the average cost of a one-month supply for each drug. But remember, drug prices change often. These prices also do not include discounts from insurance companies.

Eslicarbazepine acetate (Aptiom)
$800 for thirty 400-mg tablets of the brand-name version Aptiom

Carbamazepine (Carbatrol)
$130 for sixty 200-mg tablets of the brand-name version Carbatrol
$70 for sixty 200-mg tablets of the generic carbamazepine

Valproic acid (Depakene)
$240 for ninety 250-mg tablets of the brand-name version Depakene
$51 for ninety 250-mg tablets of the generic valproic acid

Valproic acid (Depakote)
$350 for ninety 500-mg tablets of the brand-name version Depakote
$75 for ninety 500-mg tablets of the generic valproic acid

Divalproex sodium (Depakote ER)
$380 for sixty 500-mg tablets of the brand-name version Depakote ER
$180 for sixty 500-mg tablets of the generic divalproex sodium

Phenytoin (Dilantin)
$88 for ninety 100-mg capsules of the brand-name version Dilantin
$65 for ninety 100-mg capsules of the generic phenytoin

Felbamate (Felbatol)
$1200 for ninety 600-mg tablets of the brand-name version Felbatol
$350 for ninety 600-mg tablets of the generic felbamate

Perampanel (Fycompa)
$1400 for 120 4-mg tablets of the brand-name version Fycompa

Tiagabine (Gabitril)
$240 for thirty 4-mg tablets of the brand-name version Gabitril
$150 for thirty 4-mg tablets of the generic tiagabine

Levetiracetam (Keppra)
$450 for sixty 500-mg tablets of the brand-name version Keppra
$44-80 for sixty 500-mg tablets of the generic levetiracetam

Clonazepam (Klonopin)
$150 for sixty 0.5-mg tablets of the brand-name version Klonopin
$35 for sixty 0.5-mg tablets of the generic clonazepam

Lamotrigine (Lamictal)
$350 for thirty 100-mg tablets of the brand-name version Lamictal
$80 for thirty 100-mg tablets of the generic lamotrigine

Pregabalin (Lyrica)
$430 for sixty 75-mg capsules of the brand-name version Lyrica

Primidone (Mysoline)
$800 for sixty 50-mg tablets of the brand-name version Mysoline
$35 for sixty 50-mg tablets of the generic primidone

Gabapentin (Neurontin)
$165-350 for ninety 300-mg capsules of the brand-name version Neurontin
$40 for ninety 300-mg capsules of the generic gabapentin

Oxcarbazepine (Oxtellar XR)
$380 for thirty 600-mg tablets of the brand-name version Oxtellar XR

Phenytoin (Phenytek)
$140 for ninety 200-mg capsules of the brand-name version Phenytek
$90 for ninety 200-mg capsules of the generic phenytoin

Carbamazepine (Tegretol)
$127 for sixty 200-mg tablets of the brand-name version Tegretol
$67 for sixty 200-mg tablets of the generic carbamazepine

Topiramate (Topamax)
$310 for sixty 25-mg tablets of the brand-name version Topamax
$57 for sixty 25-mg tablets of the generic topiramate

Oxcarbazepine (Trileptal)
$410 for sixty 300-mg tablets of the brand-name version Trileptal
$150 for sixty 300-mg tablets of the generic oxcarbazepine

Ethosuximide (Zarontin)
$350 for 120 of the 250-mg capsules of the brand-name version Zarontin
$155 for 120 of the 250-mg capsules of the generic ethosuximide

Zonisamide (Zonegran)
$720 for sixty 100-mg capsules of the brand-name version Zonegran
$80 for sixty 100-mg capsules of the generic zonisamide

Clorazepate (Tranxene)
$400 for sixty 7.5-mg tablets of the brand-name version Tranxene
$35 for sixty 7.5-mg tablets of the generic clorazepate

Diazepam (Valium)
$310 for sixty 5-mg tablets of the brand-name version Valium
$25 for sixty 5-mg tablets of the generic diazepam

Phenobarbital
$50 for sixty 64.8-mg tablets of the generic phenobarbital

Comment rightist philosophies of selfishness (Score 0) 553

"Tennessee woman dies after losing government benefits and medicine"

So, that Daily Kos headline...gotta be some sort of Trump outfall or at least something to blame on Republicans right? Or at least evil corporations...

Indeed, the brief Kos article says "Part of the Republican concept of healthcare is that you die or to go to the emergency room, and hopefully get lucky and don’t die. What happened to Amy Schnelle can and will continue to happen to many more people now that tax breaks for the rich are the main focus of our government’s healthcare plan."

But let's check the original source (http://wate.com/2017/03/13/ knoxville-woman-with-epilepsy- dies-after-government-benefits-stop/)

Amy Schnelle, 31, died of an epileptic seizure on February 17. She died less than half a year after the government cut her benefits, including medication.

To her friends and family, Amy Schnelle, a former factory worker, was kind, fun loving and vivacious. She battled with epilepsy most of her life.

On disability for several years, Amy Schnelle was receiving powerful anti-seizure drugs and had been seizure free since 2015. Then the United States Social Security Administration threw her a curve ball in September 2016 when they informed her she was no longer sick.

[So it was the Obama Administration's Social Security SSDI board that decided...well before the election...]

She appealed the decision, but while her appeal was under consideration, Amy Schnelle’s benefits stopped. Nevertheless, three of the drug manufacturers provided her with sample drugs, but one did not. Sylvia Schnelle, Amy Schnelle’s mother, said without the full supply of prescription pills, her daughter relapsed in late October.

[So 3 of 4 corporations provided her with free drugs...it is not stated why the 4th didn't nor how much that last drug might have cost; nor is it stated if she or anyone in her family, friends, church, etc. even bothered to try to just buy the missing drug with their own money...]

Writing to Congressman Jimmy Duncan, Amy Schnelle was able to convince the government to resume her benefits. That happened in January 2017, but in February 2017, from her apartment, she texted her mother she had a “bad” seizure and asked her to “please” come. Her mother rushed to Knoxville from her home in Dandridge.

[Congressman Duncan is a Republican...who endorsed Trump...but he helped get the agency to reinstate her benefits...]

“Amy was on her stomach and she had already died. She died from a seizure,” said Sylvia Schnelle through tears.

[Tragic, but I fail to see how this is "Part of the Republican concept of healthcare" when it happened in the era of Obamacare and indeed as a result of the Obama Administration's actions; actions which were disputed by the lady's Republican, Trump supporting, Congressman.]

Comment My netflix rant (Score 0) 80

I like netflix, have been a subscriber for a very long time.

But I hate trying to find something to watch on Netlix streaming.

I *really* don't want to wade through 800 old TV shows. Or the 100 or so Netflix Originals.

I'm primarily interested in movies. Or, rather, when I do want to watch old TV show or Netflix Original, there's already pre-defined Menus for those: "Netflix Originals" and "TV Shows" (although the latter tends to include all of the former too). I have watched several Netflix Original series and enjoyed them.

But there's not a corresponding inverted search--show me *only* movies, esp. show me *only* movies released in last year.

All the Genre menus load up Netflix Originals and TV shows.

I'd love an adequate search that at least would allow me to distinguish movies from TV shows from Netflix Originals.

The DVD search is hardly much better, but tends to have a lot more movies already, and I keep a 2-disk membership mostly for movies. I'd probably do better to reduce my Netflix to streaming only and use the Redbox at the grocery store.

Comment Similar thought after 1 and 2 (Score 3, Interesting) 542

I thought it would lead to layered realities, and that it would expose that many people are perfectly content in the baseline Matrix, some people's minds rebel. These people are identified and hooked to a 2nd Matrix in which they are made aware of the baseline Matrix, can interact with it, pursue their hero fantasies each to their own level necessary (Neo needed to be the One, Trinity need to be in love with the One, Morpheus had to be the one to find the One...) and steered into the whole Zion mythos.

A few might, like Neo, once exposed to he baseline Matrix, realize that they could be in a 2nd-level Matrix and find themselves able to manipulate it as well. At that point a 3rd..N+1 level matrix would be unnecessary. Those unlucky few would just be lobotomized by the machines and put back in the soup. The effort to entertain the chosen ones with Matrix 2 is justified only by the notion that the undamaged brains allow more wetware computing power to be utilized (i.e., humans not just batteries).

Neo getting a big needle in his brain may have been an unpleasant ending. Perhaps once the battle of Zion happened, the 3rd movie would end with a "reset" back to Neo first waking up in Scene 1 of the first matrix. They can just keep Groundhog Daying the hell out of Zion.

Comment Apropos joke in inbox today (Score 3, Funny) 498

WINDOWS: Please enter your new password.
USER: cabbage
WINDOWS: Sorry, the password must be more than 8 characters.
USER: boiledcabbage
WINDOWS: Sorry, the password must contain 1 numerical character.
USER: 1 boiledcabbage
WINDOWS: Sorry, the password cannot have blank spaces.
USER: 50fuckingboiledcabbages
WINDOWS: Sorry, the password must contain at least one upper case character.
USER: 50FUCKINGboiledcabbages
WINDOWS: Sorry, the password cannot use more than one upper case character consecutively.
USER: 50FuckingBoiledCabbages ShovedUpYourAssIfYouDon'tGiveMeAccessNow!
WINDOWS: Sorry, the password cannot contain punctuation.
USER: ReallyPissedOff50FuckingBoiledCabbages ShovedUpYourAssIfYouDontGiveMeAccessNow
WINDOWS: Sorry, that password is already used.

Comment Women need to take more risk? (Score 2) 421

Of the about 4500 annual workplace fatalities, 92% are men.

http://www.aei.org/publication...

Because women tend to work in safer occupations than men on average, they have the advantage of being able to work for more than a decade longer than men before they experience the same number of male occupational fatalities in a single year.

Economic theory tells us that the “gender occupational fatality gap” explains part of the “gender pay gap” because a disproportionate number of men work in higher-risk, but higher-paid occupations like coal mining (almost 100% male), fire fighters (95% male), police officers (87% male), correctional officers (72% male), farming, fishing, and forestry (77% male), and construction (97.5% male); BLS data here. On the other hand, a disproportionate number of women work in relatively low-risk industries, often with lower pay to partially compensate for the safer, more comfortable indoor office environments in occupations like office and administrative support (73% female), education, training, and library occupations (74% female), and health care (75% female). The higher concentrations of men in riskier occupations with greater occurrences of workplace injuries and fatalities suggest that more men than women are willing to expose themselves to those work-related injuries or death in exchange for higher wages. In contrast, women more than men prefer lower risk occupations with greater workplace safety, and are frequently willing to accept lower wages for the reduced probability of work-related injury or death.

Comment University of California, San Francisco (Score 1) 391

The organization in question here is not some for-profit 1%-er evil CEO run korporashun, like say, Apple, Tesla, or the Daily Kos.

It's a public university run by the glorious people's State of California, and presumably all the faculty and staff are good San Fransiscans or at least good Californians who seek nothing more than progress.

Comment Re:so what? (Score 4, Informative) 644

The CBO produced a report "THE INCIDENCE OF THE CORPORATE INCOME TAX" in which it states "A corporation may write its check to the Internal Revenue Service for payment of the corporate income tax, but that money must come from somewhere: from reduced returns to investors in the company, lower wages to its workers, or higher prices that consumers pay for the products the company produces."

And it goes on to say

"Although economists are far from a consensus about exactly who bears how much of the burden of the corporate income tax, the existing studies highlight the significant types of economic mechanisms as well as the empirical estimates necessary for further quantifying the burdens. CBO's review of the studies yields the following conclusions:

o The short-term burden of the corporate tax probably falls on stockholders or investors in general, but may fall on some more than on others, because not all investments are taxed at the same rate.

o The long-term burden of corporate or dividend taxation is unlikely to rest fully on corporate equity, because it will remain there only if marginal investment is not affected by those taxes. Most economists believe that the corporate tax system has some effect on investment decisions.

o Most evidence from closed-economy, general-equilibrium models suggests that given reasonable parameters, the long-term incidence of the corporate tax falls on capital in general.

o In the context of international capital mobility, the burden of the corporate tax may be shifted onto immobile factors (such as labor or land), but only to the degree that the capital and outputs of different countries can be substituted.

o In the very long term, the burden is likely to be shifted in part to labor, if the corporate tax dampens capital accumulation.

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