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Submission + - Schneier: We Need To Relearn How To Accept Risk (schneier.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: Bruce Schneier has written an article about how our society is becoming increasingly averse to risk as we invent technological solutions to it. 'Risk tolerance is both cultural and dependent on the environment around us. As we have advanced technologically as a society, we have reduced many of the risks that have been with us for millennia. Fatal childhood diseases are things of the past, many adult diseases are curable, accidents are rarer and more survivable, buildings collapse less often, death by violence has declined considerably, and so on. All over the world — among the wealthier of us who live in peaceful Western countries — our lives have become safer.' This has led us to overestimate both the level of risk from unlikely events and also our ability to curtail it. Thus, trillions of dollars are spent and vital liberties are lost in misguided efforts to make us safer. 'We need to relearn how to recognize the trade-offs that come from risk management, especially risk from our fellow human beings. We need to relearn how to accept risk, and even embrace it, as essential to human progress and our free society. The more we expect technology to protect us from people in the same way it protects us from nature, the more we will sacrifice the very values of our society in futile attempts to achieve this security.'

Submission + - Dotless domain names prohibited, ICANN tells Google

gwstuff writes: Last year, Google had filed applications for about 100 top level domains. These included .app, .cloud and .lol, but perhaps most prominently .search, which they had requested to operate as a "dotless" domain. Today, ICANN gave their verdict on the idea that would make this URL valid : NO. Here is the formal announcement from earlier today, and a related Slashdot story from last year.

So that's that. But it may still be granted the rights for remaining 100. Is prime .COM real estate going to become a thing of the past?

Submission + - Apple now relaying all FaceTime calls due to lost patent dispute (arstechnica.com)

Em Adespoton writes: Before the VirnetX case, nearly all FaceTime calls were done through a system of direct communication. Essentially, Apple would verify that both parties had valid FaceTime accounts and then allow their two devices to speak directly to each other over the Internet, without any intermediary or "relay" servers. However, a small number of calls—5 to 10 percent, according to an Apple engineer who testified at trial—were routed through "relay servers."

At the August 15 hearing, a VirnetX lawyer stated that Apple had logged "over half a million calls" complaining about the quality of FaceTime [since disabling direct connections].

Submission + - Extra life: The amazing fan-made game revivals (redbull.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Sometimes games don't get the sequels that they deserve — unless their fans have a say. In a new article published today, the author takes a look at some of the best homebrew sequels and open source clones, from the blockbuster Half Life reimagining Black Mesa to OpenTTD, the fan-made version of Transport Tycoon. StepMania might just be the most remarkable of them all: originally built as means to open Dance Dance Revolution files, it's evolved into a rhythm game engine in its own right, powering iPhone games and arcade cabinets alike. The creator, meanwhile, has landed a job as a software engineer at Pinterest. Not bad for an open source clone.

Submission + - German Court Affirms GPL: Source Must Match Executable

Alsee writes: Fantec was found to be distributing Linux based media players with an incorrect (older) version of source code. Fantec blamed their Chinese supplier for the problem, but a German Court ruled Fantec was responsible for ensuring their own compliance with the GPL. "According to the court, the company should have checked the completeness of the sources themselves or with the help of experts, even if that would have incurred additional costs." I propose a better solution. If your company is subcontracting software development simply use the supplied source to compile your executable.
United States

Submission + - Apple Denied Trademark for Multi-Touch (macrumors.com)

suraj.sun writes: In a decision handed down by the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board at the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), Apple has been denied an application for a trademark on Multi-Touch. Apple originally applied for the trademark on January 9, 2007, the day the iPhone was introduced.

A lawyer for the USPTO denied Apple's initial trademark application and the company appealed to the Appeal Board. The board upheld the initial refusal to grant the trademark.

For trademarks, "the greater the degree of descriptiveness the term has, the heavier the burden to prove it has attained secondary meaning." The trademark attorney pointed out that the term "multitouch" has taken on generic meaning, being used by a wide variety of publications to describe the touchscreen technology on Android phones, tablets, and notebooks.

http://www.macrumors.com/2011/09/26/apple-denied-trademark-for-multi-touch/

Crime

Submission + - RSA Admits SecurID Tokens Have Been Compromised (net-security.org)

Orome1 writes: RSA has finally admitted publicly that the March breach into its systems has resulted in the compromise of their SecurID two-factor authentication tokens. The admission comes in the wake of cyber intrusions into the networks of three US military contractors: Lockheed Martin, L-3 Communications and Northrop Grumman — one of them confirmed by the company, others hinted at by internal warnings and unusual domain name and password reset process.
Censorship

Submission + - Alarm over EU 'Great Firewall' proposal (telegraph.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: Broadband providers have voiced alarm over an EU proposal to create a “Great Firewall of Europe” by blocking “illicit” web material at the borders of the bloc, while anti-censorship campaigners compared the plan to China’s notorious system for controlling citizens’ access to blogs, news websites and social networking services.
Microsoft

Submission + - Malware scanner finds 5% of Windows PCs infected (winbeta.org) 1

BogenDorpher writes: "According to statistics generated by Microsoft's new free malware scanning and scrubbing tool, Safety Scanner, one in every twenty Windows PCs were infected with malware.

Microsoft's Safety Scanner was downloaded 420,000 times in just one week of availability and it cleaned up malware or signs of exploitation from more than 20,000 Windows PCs, according to statistics generated by Microsoft's Malware Protection Center. This resulted in an infection rate of nearly 5%."

Apple

Submission + - Alaska Airlines Jettisons Paper Manuals (engadget.com)

fullymodo writes: "Alaska Airlines has become the first major US airline to hop on board the paperless bandwagon. While it's not quite ready to ditch paper navigation charts just yet (though that is under consideration), the airline has announced that it will be replacing its traditional flight manuals with iPads, which will be loaded up with the GoodReader app and PDFs of 41 different manuals and other materials."
So explain why I have to shut off my non-wi-fi-capable ebook reader during take-off and landing?

Submission + - Lodsys after pay wall websites

denizb writes: We are a small company with a website offering paid membership to access our own produced reality show type videos. Non members are able to preview trailers, and then if they like what they see, can purchase a monthly membership to watch our shows via streaming on desktop and mobile platforms.

We have just received the same Infringement notice from Lodsys as the app developers.

They are claiming that they basically invented the internet by asserting that anything that allows for a user to access its content from his or her current physical location, and stores information about said user, and offers a way to sell that user a membership, or product (where the product is full access to the content), is infringing on their patent.

Basically they are claiming to have invented commerce on the internet.

What do?
Education

Submission + - Woz, Chambers, Ballmer deliver commencement talks (networkworld.com) 1

alphadogg writes: So far this month Cisco CEO John Chambers has delivered a commencement speech at Duke, while Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak did the same at Michigan State and Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer did likewise at USC. They were among a slew of tech bigshots in demand at 2011 commencement ceremonies. Among Chambers' advice: Go to the bathroom before you make important decisions. The Woz advised being nice to people to get anywhere in life, and that once a jerk, always a jerk...(videos)
Games

Submission + - SPAM: Four Reasons You Should Keep Your Old Video Game S

youowemelunch writes: When companies release video game systems, consumers often trade/sell the old ones to cut down on clutter and make some money. We certainly understand that logic, having sold a bunch of dusty and neglected portables and consoles to pay for the new flavor of the month.
Link to Original Source
Botnet

Submission + - Coreflood Botnet Shows How ISPs are Clueless (securityweek.com)

wiredmikey writes: Internet Service Providers are maintaining environments in which malicious networks can thrive.

For Example — Coreflood is one of the oldest botnets in operation. It has gained fame due to the intervention the Justice Department recently took to seize control of the expansive botnet. But its impact has been documented for years in various exploits resulting in millions of infected computers and unique bots, stolen banking, credit card, email, and social site passwords.

Coreflood was able to operate continuously due to the lack of accountability of Service Providers and lack of visibility into their networks.

The FBI complaint lists some of the major ISPs that the botnet operators used in their C&C (Command and Control) infrastructure, including: 2 ASNs (Autonomous Systems), 24 domain names (60, including tertiary), 15 DNS Providers, and 18 Registrars.

This information is knowable and can be managed and secured. It’s well past time for ISP scorecards.....[CONTINUED]

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