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Comment Re:5 is only one generation from current 5X (Score 1) 157

Its generations not phones that matter.

It's not generations that matter either. What matters is the hardware capabilities and the ongoing difficulty of supporting older models with significantly different hardware. (This is why support was dropped early for the Galaxy Nexus: the OEM for the SoC exited the market and made it all but impossible to get updated binary drivers for the GN hardware which would work with kernels later versions depended on.)

The reason why people are rightly upset with this decision is that there is very little hardware difference between the Nexus 5, which is not supported, and the Nexus 5X, which is, making this an arbitrary cutoff most likely motivated more by marketing and an attempt to drive people to buy newer phones (when their old ones are working just fine) than by reasonable technical constraints.

Oh well. There are always 3rd-party ROMs. As small as the hardware differences are it shouldn't take long for someone to port AOSP 7.0 to run on the Nexus 5. It would just have been nice to be able to rely on a reasonable level of ongoing support from the original vendor. Other operating systems, and especially ones based on Linux, tend to run just fine on hardware far older than three years, and smartphone specs are no longer improving at so rapid a pace that a three-year-old device can be presumed obsolete.

Comment Not a good idea (Score 1) 110

Security camera resolution is always horrible, so I LOL at who thinks this is even possible. Either it won't work or they will waste money and time tracking false positives. Hey at least the minister's proxy shares in the facial recognition software company will pay off. That oughta count for something.

Comment Re:Wastage (Score 1) 148

Really? it's _already_ happening.

For example sprint owns 2600:: - 2600:7:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff ..which means they own billions of trillions of addresses .. to be clear .. sprint owns 633,825,300,114,114,700,748,351,602,688 ipv6 addresses. They don't have that many customers. Sprint is just one example. Similarly there will be a few hundred ISPs that will grab vast amounts of the address space an sub-allocate the addresses over-generously. It's not exactly easy to take it back especially if the numbers are address randomly. Sprint isn't going to want to give back chunks of the space since it would mean having to reconfigure servers that may have been in those chunks.

Comment Human (Score 1) 148

Unfortunately, and as far as I can tell, I am either a human or a holographic projection with limited storage capacity. I need IPv4 cause I can't memorize an IPv6 address. Seriously, who can remember an address like 2001:0db8:0a0b:12f0:0000:0000:0000:0001 .. you have got to be kidding me

Comment Re:Is this so hard (Score 1) 110

No. There may be a temporary "rate this call" pop up after you hang up when it's a number that doesn't normally call you.

I would certainly be more annoyed if things started popping up on my phone. It would be magic, since it has no display.

You also refer to "hanging up", and since I don't waste time answering in the first place, your solution is useless to me.

In fact, it's a godsend to telespammers since it requires people to answer the spam phone calls before they can "rate" it, thus providing confirmation of the validity of the number and making the spammer's number list more valuable when they sell it to the next spammer.

Uh, if people don't answer telespammers then the robocalling issue wouldn't exist in the first place. Fact is that most people need to answer their phone. How do I know it's not a legitimate call from my bank or somebody who needs my help calling me from a different number than usual? The thing is with my system most spammers will be shutdown quickly. And btw, a list of numbers without useful information about the person being called is useless. I mean, if you dial a random phone number 90% of the time it's valid number -- try it. It makes no sense to buy a list where all it says is that the phone number belongs to someone. For some area codes like 212 it's just about impossible to find a non-valid number. Who is going to pay for a list of phone numbers if the only information is that the phone number is real -- nothing about the caller etc. Such a list is useless to spammers.

Comment Re:Is this so hard (Score 1) 110

No. There may be a temporary "rate this call" pop up after you hang up when it's a number that doesn't normally call you. This happens when you use other services like skype .. it isn't a problem. It can be ignored, you aren't forced to rate the call. They can make it even more subtle if that turns out to be annoying (users who want to rate a call can go into their history and rate it there -- statistics can account for the fact that only angry users will bother).

ALL of which is extra steps for users and extra time.

Uh, No. There are no extra steps for users. The pop up -- which can be ignored/disabled and only appears when a new phone number appears -- happens AFTER the phone call and you don't need to click ignore it will go away automatically. How many new phone numbers call you on a cell phone anyway? It rarely happens for me, if seeing a popup after a call like that makes you upset maybe you should get therapy? But like I said if seeing a pop up after a phone call is too stressful for you then don't enable that feature. Millions of people would enable it, I mean millions of people signed up for Do-not-call lists .. and that involved a number of steps.

No. Collection agencies, most of which are unscrupulous anyway, could apply for and get themselves a special exemption.

But the scammers can't get this same exception? The exception can't be overridden with enough complaints? The exception can't be technically implemented by companies that don't have a legitimate exception? And cars will run on fair farts in the future too, right?

Uh, the method to handle this should be obvious. The exemption will be pricey enough to handle the fact that approval and subsequent follow up investigation can be handled by the organization setup to maintain this. And yes you would have an external organization handling these approvals and database. You do realize that phone and technologies companies already have setup industry organizations to deal with things (lobbying, LTE, interoperability etc. come to mind) -- so being able to contribute and cooperate through an organization is not new or difficult.

How would you SWAT someone's phone line through this? You can't even block someone's number unless you and a bunch of phone numbers you received a call from it?

You really don't have any idea on the technical requirements of what you want, do you? Who holds the database? Does each company hold it's own? How do companies compare databases? How does someone with a LANDLINE report? How do you handle reporting for VoIP lines? You can't just assume everyone has a cell phone, or that they have a smartphone and data plan. You have to have someway to get reports from non-data enabled lines. How do you deal with foreign numbers, or numbers routed through call forwarding?

You don't have anything approaching a workable solution.

It should be obvious that the database is managed by an organization that each of the phone companies subscribe to. They ALREADY do it for tons of other things, why not this? Heck we can have npac.com (Number Portability Administration Center) take this on, I mean that organization is currently getting paid millions of dollars to host a database of phone numbers. Or the organization handling Do not call lists currently.

As for how do they report, that too should be obvious too. Any problem you are pointing out has an easy solution. People on a landline can dial a * code to report the number. This is something they ALREADY CAN DO. Except currently that causes basically no action other than getting compiled in some FTC database or the number to be temporarily blocked from calling you. VOIP can do a similar thing or go to the website of the organization designated to handle this issue (for example, the do-not-call website).

Comment Re:Is this so hard (Score 1) 110

"Requires users to spend extra time after making a call, and could be confusing."

No. There may be a temporary "rate this call" pop up after you hang up when it's a number that doesn't normally call you. This happens when you use other services like skype .. it isn't a problem. It can be ignored, you aren't forced to rate the call. They can make it even more subtle if that turns out to be annoying (users who want to rate a call can go into their history and rate it there -- statistics can account for the fact that only angry users will bother).

"It could also get legitimate numbers (collection agencies following the law) blacklisted wrongly because people don't like them"

No. Collection agencies, most of which are unscrupulous anyway, could apply for and get themselves a special exemption.

"or allow people to now SWAT phone numbers of people which could be a serious safety concern given how many households rely on only a single cellular line."

How would you SWAT someone's phone line through this? You can't even block someone's number unless you and a bunch of phone numbers you received a call from it?

Comment Is this so hard (Score 5, Insightful) 110

Seriously, they will only prevent spoofing from "important" numbers? That's open to all kinds of abuse. How many people know their bank's number? This plan will make the problem even worse and eventually they will ask for federal funds to "manage" the problem.

Is it difficult to come up with a better plan? Actually yes. Yes when you don't care about helping people. This can be ended quite easily, blacklist numbers that receive a large ratio of complaints to calls. Make it possible to rate received calls. Also, prevent spoofing from all numbers, not just specific ones. Wow this plan didn't take me 30 days to come up with, it took me 30 seconds.

Comment Re:I call B.S. (Score 1) 282

Dude, how long have VR and flying cars been promised for? 100 years at most? People sat around waiting for airplanes to be invented for 600 years. Stop trying to slow things down with your negativity. You guys block funding for science and then complain you aren't getting anything out of it. That's what happened to nuclear fusion research, budgets were cut by 90% in the 70s.. and then we are told fusion energy is impossible. wtf.

Comment Re:Can we say... MODEM speed? (Score 1) 71

but it appears most modems were built without the ability to transmit at the higher rates or its disabled in the software

Well, yes. As I said, consumer-grade modems with analog interfaces weren't designed to establish 56k connections with other analog modems, no matter how good the signal might be. It wouldn't work in most cases anyway and none of the 56k protocols cover that situation. To get 56k in one direction you need the special equipment the ISPs use, which is designed to interface with the phone networks digitally.

Comment Re:Can we say... MODEM speed? (Score 1) 71

I happen to have a PSTN simulator and I've only been able to get two modems to connect at 33.6k synchronous. Apparently I need some special hardware to get it to run in asynchronous mode.

56k connections (V.90 or V.92) only ever worked at full speed in one direction. They take advantage of the fact that the ISP is using a 64kbps DS0 digital line, so there is only one A/D conversion involved rather than the usual two. The 56k modem protocols were never intended to work with all-analog connections, and a direct link between two 56k client modems would max out at 33.6k (V.34). In theory you could get 56k or better with PCM over a suitably high-quality channel, but the protocols—and more importantly, the modems—weren't designed for that use case. To establish a 56k connection with a standard 56k modem you would need a DS0 connection and suitable ISP-grade equipment on the other side. (Sorry, I wasn't able to find any product links.)

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