Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment Re:Driving yes, but charging? (Score 1) 990

So while it takes ~7.6 hours in the diesel car it would take ~46.5 hours in a Leaf, and even if you started with the Leaf fully charged it would still take around 33.5 hours!

So if you're travelling from charge point to charge point with a significant stop while you're there and don't plan on travelling more than about 100 miles in a 15 hour time span then yes it is slightly more convenient in the sense that plugging it in takes 30 seconds and filling up a fuel tank takes 5 minutes.

Using a Chademo charger that can dump 50KW into the 30kwh battery, The leaf would need a real world 3 additional charges, at around 20 minutes each. So it would take about 8.6 hours in the leaf, not 46.5. These are pretty common, though not anywhere near as common as gas stations at this point (plugshare.com). Most Teslas on the road would need only one additional 20 minute charge.

Piracy

The Open Bay Helps Launch 372 'Copies' of the Pirate Bay In a Week 63

An anonymous reader writes isoHunt, the group now best known for launching The Old Pirate Bay, has shared an update a week after debuting The Open Bay. The Pirate Bay, the most popular file sharing website on the planet, still isn't back following police raids on its data center in Sweden, but its "cause" is very much alive. So far, 372 "copies" of The Pirate Bay have been created thanks to the project. The torrent database dump, which combines content from isoHunt, KickassTorrents (via its public API), and The Old Pirate Bay, has seen 1,256 downloads to date.

Comment Effectively ended last year (Score 1) 242

This has been a few years in the making -- DynDNS started killing free hostnames that failed to check in within 30 days last June (maybe before?). I suppose you could sign up again, but they also removed a variety of domain names you could choose from. I lost my long held domain with a ath.cx suffix due to forgetting to confirm my dyndns login info after a DDwrt update.

I moved to Hurricane Electric a few years back as my primary dynamic DNS. They'll host your DNS for a domain you own for free, including dynamic update support. he.net

Submission + - Why are younger people losing interest in cars? (chicagotribune.com) 14

Strudelkugel writes: The average car on the road is 11.4 years old, according to Polk, a global automotive analysis firm, which reviewed 247 million light vehicles in the U.S. The age of cars has been gradually increasing since 2002, when the average car was 9.8 years old. Polk expects the trend to continue over the next five years. Automotive density is projected to decline to 77.5 cars per 100 people, down from 80 cars per 100 in 2007, according to Kelsey Mays of Cars.com.

Another study, from the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute, analyzed the reason for the decline in young driver licensing. Of the 618 unlicensed respondents aged 18-39, 26.9 percent said the main reason they did not get a license was “too busy or not enough time to get a driver’s license.”

Submission + - Cell Tower Jammer Created From Cheap Phone Using Open Source Firmware (technologyreview.com)

bryanandaimee writes: A few years ago the baseband code for the Vitelcom TSM30 was leaked to the public. From that leaked code others have written open source GSM firmware firmware for the baseband processor. Using that code researchers in Berlin have created firmware to intercept the cell tower to cell phone handshake and block calls and text messages from getting through. A single hacked cell phone can bring down a cell.

Submission + - US electrical grid on the edge of failure (nature.com)

ananyo writes: Facebook can lose a few users and remain a perfectly stable network, but where the national grid is concerned simple geography dictates that it is always just a few transmission lines from collapse, according to a mathematical study of spatial networks. The upshot of the study is that spatial networks are necessarily dependent on any number of critical nodes whose failure can lead to abrupt — and unpredictable — collapse.
The warning comes ten years after a blackout that crippled parts of the midwest and northeastern United States and parts of Canada. In that case, a series of errors resulted in the loss of three transmission lines in Ohio over the course of about an hour. Once the third line went down, the outage cascaded towards the coast, cutting power to some 50 million people. The authors say that this outage is an example of the inherent instability the study describes. But others question whether the team’s conclusions can really be extrapolated to the real world. “The problem is that this doesn’t reflect the physics of how the power grid operates,” says Jeff Dagle, an electrical engineer at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington, who served on the government task force that investigated the 2003 outage.

Comment porn.exe, Sexy.exe virus variants are most likely (Score 1) 136

Seen several cases of this across several different companies. I would think that the power/utility company admins are subject to the same oversights that most are. This has been seen in several different variants, and the major AV vendors have trouble identifying it accurately.

Main route of infection is via autoplay.inf. It also spreads to all available drive letters, including external drives and network shares. Easy prevention would be to disable autoplay.inf across the forest with a GPO. Windows XP machines are usually the ones the culprit that allows the first infection. It goes through and hides and sets system attribs on folders (and sometimes changes permissions) on the network share (and any accessible drive letter) using the (domain) credentials of the currently logged in user. If that user has more access, more things get screwed up.

Pain to clean up; to do it thoroughly, each machine must be scrubbed clean while disconnected from the network. Also, all usb drives should be scrubbed as well.

Can't be sure that's what they were hit with, but I would not be surprised if this was it.
Space

Submission + - Was there only one Big Bang? (physicsworld.com)

goldaryn writes: physorg.com are running an interesting story about the work of Oxford-based theoretical physicist Roger Penrose.

Penrose has been studying CWB radiation and believes it's possible that space and time did not come into being at the Big Bang but that our universe in fact continually cycles through a series of "aeons". He believes that he has found evidence supporting his theory that the universe infinitely cycles, which contradicts current theory.

They thank Physics World , who ran the original story.

Google

Is Cloud Computing the Hotel California of Tech? 250

Prolific blogger and open source enthusiast Matt Asay ponders whether cloud computing may be the Hotel California of tech. It seems that data repositories in the form of Googles and Facebooks are very easy to dump data into, but can be quite difficult to move data between. "I say this because even for companies, like Google, that articulate open-data policies, the cloud is still largely a one-way road into Web services, with closed data networks making it difficult to impossible to move data into competing services. Ever tried getting your Facebook data into, say, MySpace? Good luck with that. Social networks aren't very social with one other, as recently noted on the Atonomo.us mailing list. For the freedom-inclined among us, this is cause for concern. For the capitalists, it's just like Software 1.0 all over again, with fat profits waiting to be had. The great irony, of course, is that it's all built with open source."
It's funny.  Laugh.

Submission + - RIAA Bashed in the Sunday Comics

ryanduff writes: While reading the comics this morning, I had a good laugh as the comic Foxtrot (Bill Amend) bashes the Recording Industry Association of America for suing "single moms, widows, grandmothers, dead people, and children." Jason Fox attempts to get away with downloading by teaching his pet iguana Quincy how to use Bittorrent and someone at the RIAA puts their psychiatrist on hold because "someone named 'lizardlips' is downloading Metallica."

Slashdot Top Deals

How many surrealists does it take to screw in a lightbulb? One to hold the giraffe and one to fill the bathtub with brightly colored power tools.

Working...