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Comment If you really want simple and effective: rcs+$Id$ (Score 1) 325

I still use RCS because it has the in-line markup to keep track of the revision you have. And is so simple to set-up and use that a 1 page cheat-sheet is usually enough for most people that can type without looking at their fingers. Put it on a ZFS filesystem and take hourly snapshots. Don't worry about network access, since that is how you are going to loose your repo. People can login to a server to edit and rsync to make remote copies. Easy and safe (using ssh for example). I always display the $Id$ string in the version output for each module under -V or --version: that means you can know for sure that you have the latest version before you test/release.

Submission + - Debian dropping Linux Standard Base (lwn.net)

basscomm writes: For years (as seen on Slashdot) the Linux Standard Base has been developed as an attempt to reduce the differences between Linux distributions in an effort significant effort. However, Debian Linux has announced that they are dropping support for the Linux Standard Base due to a lack of interest.

If [Raboud's] initial comments about lack of interest in LSB were not evidence enough, a full three months then went by with no one offering any support for maintaining the LSB-compliance packages and two terse votes in favor of dropping them. Consequently, on September 17, Raboud announced that he had gutted the src:lsb package (leaving just lsb-base and lsb-release as described) and uploaded it to the "unstable" archive. That minimalist set of tools will allow an interested user to start up the next Debian release and query whether or not it is LSB-compliant—and the answer will be "no."


Submission + - Linus: "2016 Will Be the Year of the ARM Laptop" (softpedia.com)

jones_supa writes: Linus Torvalds took the stage at the latest LinuxCon 2015 that took place in Dublin, Ireland, and talked about a number of things, including security and the future for Linux on ARM hardware. There is nothing that will blow your mind, but there are a couple of interesting statements nonetheless. Chromebooks are slowly taking over the world and a large number of those Chromebooks are powered by ARM processors. "I'm happy to see that ARM is making progress. One of these days, I will actually have a machine with ARM. They said it would be this year, but maybe it'll be next year. 2016 will be the year of the ARM laptop," said Linus excitedly. He also explained that one of the problems now is actually finding people to maintain Linux. It's not a glorious job, and it usually entails answering emails seven days a week. Finding someone with the proper set of skills and the time to do this job is difficult.

Submission + - Linux Foundation: Security Threatens 'Golden Age' Of Open Source

Mickeycaskill writes: The executive director Linux Foundation has outlined its plans to improve open source security, which could otherwise threaten a 'golden age' which has created billion dollar companiesand seen Microsoft and Apple among others embrace open technologies.

The organisation launched the Core infrastructure Initiative (CII), a body backed by 20 major IT firms, last year and is investing millions of dollars in grants, tools and other support for open source projects that have until now been underfunded.

This was never move obvious than following the discovery of the Heartbleed Open SSL bug last year.

“Almost the entirety of the internet is entirely reliant on open source software,” he said. “We’ve reached a golden age of open source. Virtually every technology and product and service is created using open source.

“Heartbleed literally broke the security of the Internet. Over a long period of time, whether we knew it or not, became dependent on open source for the security and Integrity of the internet.”

“We want to find the projects on the Internet that are broken and fix them. We have raised a multi-million fund to provide grants to projects to help them out."

“We’re not talking about some new technology product or service, we’re talking about your privacy, your security. We believe creating a more secure, more robust Internet is good for all of us.”

Submission + - Another EPA wastewater spill in Colorado

schwit1 writes: EPA workers have caused another wastewater spill in Colorado.

According to the Denver Post, an EPA mine crew working Thursday at the Standard Mine in the mountains near Crested Butte, triggered another spill of some 2,000 gallons of wastewater into a nearby mountain creek. Supporting Tipton's remarks to Watchdog Arena, the Denver Post report states that the EPA had failed to release a report about the incident at the time of its writing.

Unlike the Gold King Mine, where on Aug. 5, an EPA mine crew exploring possible clean-up options, blew out a structural plug in the mine releasing over 3 million gallons of toxic waste into the Animas River, the Standard Mine is an EPA-designated superfund site, where the federal agency has been directing ongoing clean-up efforts.

According to a the Washington Times regarding this latest spill, Tipton's spokesman, Josh Green, said that locals in the Crested Butte area confirmed the spill. Watchdog Arena spoke directly with Tipton Thursday afternoon who claimed, "They are reporting that the spill consisted of "gray water," and was not toxic. But the definition of gray water does not preclude the presence of possible toxic substances."

It doesn't matter that this spill is smaller and at a superfund site. If a private landowner screwed up like this, and didn't report it, as required by the EPA, the EPA would move in faster than the speed of light to take everything they owned and to put them in prison.

Submission + - We've already gone beyond the Standard Model thanks to massive neutrinos

StartsWithABang writes: Yes, the Nobel Prize in physics this year was awarded for the discovery of neutrino oscillations, with the implication that neutrinos have mass. Believe it or not, this is the first and only observation of a particle in the Standard Model observed to have a behavior that isn’t predicted by the Standard Model: our first indication of beyond-the-Standard-Model physics for the known particles.

Submission + - There is no center of the Universe

StartsWithABang writes: From our vantage point, the Universe is expanding and cooling, with all but a few of the closest galaxies receding from our view. In fact, the farther away an object is, the faster it appears to recede. This may sound an awful lot like what occurs in an explosion to you, especially if it were centered on us. Furthermore, the name “the Big Bang” sure gives that same implication, doesn’t it? Yet despite these facts, it turns out that the idea that the Universe has a center is completely false, and is actually contradicted by both relativity and the Universe that we observe.

Submission + - French Premier Declares 'War' on Radical Islam 1

HughPickens.com writes: The NYT reports that Prime Minister Manuel Valls has declared that France is at war with radical Islam after the harrowing sieges that led to the deaths of three gunmen and four hostages. “It is a war against terrorism, against jihadism, against radical Islam, against everything that is aimed at breaking fraternity, freedom, solidarity,” says Valls. The French government said it would put 500 additional troops on the streets over the weekend amid preparations for a giant unity rally in Paris expected to draw over 1,000,000 people. A number of European officials say they will attend, including Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu of Turkey, the most prominent Muslim leader scheduled to be there, and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel. "This will be an extraordinary demonstration ... which must show the power and the dignity of the French people who are going to proclaim their love of freedom and tolerance," says Valls. The crisis and its aftermath presented a major challenge to President François Hollande and his government, which are facing deep religious and cultural rifts in a nation with a rapidly growing Muslim population while simultaneously coping with the security threats stemming from Islamic extremists. Large numbers of French citizens have been traveling to Syria and Iraq to fight with the Islamic State, also known as ISIS. Hollande, appealing for unity, has warned against seeing Muslims as the enemy. "These madmen, fanatics, have nothing to do with the Muslim religion," says Hollande.

Submission + - Physicist Builds Supercomputer From Old PlayStations (sciencealert.com) 1

drkim writes: A home-made PlayStation 3 supercomputer is 3,000 times more powerful than any desktop processor, and is being used to study black holes.

Guarav Khanna, a black hole physicist at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth in the US, has managed to build a powerful and extremely cheap supercomputer using old PlayStation 3s (PS3s), and he’s used it to publish several papers on black holes.

His research focusses on finding gravitational waves, which are curvatures in space-time that ripple out from a violent astrophysical event, such as two black holes colliding. They were first predicted by Einstein’s theory of general relativity, but no one has been able to observe them.

Submission + - Spy Drone hacks WiFi networks, listens to calls (wusa9.com)

schwit1 writes: It's small. It's bright yellow, and it's capable of cracking Wi-Fi passwords, eavesdropping on your cell phone calls and reading your text messages. It's a spy drone and it just landed in Washington, D.C.

Long-time friends and former Air Force buddies, Mike Tassey and Rich Perkins, describe their state-of-the-art cyber drone as hard to take down, hard to see and virtually hard to detect.

They built it in a garage, using off the shelf electronics to prove a drone can be used to launch cyber-attacks.

Submission + - Cosmic Mystery Solved? Possible Dark Matter Signal Spotted (space.com)

TaleSlinger writes: Astronomers may finally have detected a signal of dark matter, the mysterious and elusive stuff thought to make up most of the material universe.

While poring over data collected by the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton spacecraft, a team of researchers spotted an odd spike in X-ray emissions coming from two different celestial objects — the Andromeda galaxy and the Perseus galaxy cluster.

  "The signal's distribution within the galaxy corresponds exactly to what we were expecting with dark matter — that is, concentrated and intense in the center of objects and weaker and diffuse on the edges," [assuming that dark matter consists of sterile neutrinos] study co-author Oleg Ruchayskiy, of the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland, said in a statement.

"With the goal of verifying our findings, we then looked at data from our own galaxy, the Milky Way, and made the same observations," added lead author Alexey Boyarsky, of EPFL and Leiden University in the Netherlands.

  Researchers have proposed a number of different exotic particles as the constituents of dark matter, including weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), axions and sterile neutrinos, hypothetical cousins of "ordinary" neutrinos (confirmed particles that resemble electrons but lack an electrical charge).

The decay of sterile neutrinos is thought to produce X-rays, so the research team suspects these may be the dark matter particles responsible for the mysterious signal coming from Andromeda and the Perseus cluster.

Submission + - Containers, microservices, and orchestrating the whole symphony

Jason Baker writes: The monolithic application is a thing of the past. But what has replaced it? Microservices were developed as a way to divide and conquer. Instead of having one giant code base that all developers touch, that often times becomes perilous to manage, that there are numerous smaller code bases managed by small and agile teams. And container projects like Docker make the deployment of these microservices simply to manage and deploy, container management may be the next big challenge.

Submission + - BGP Hijacking Continues, Despite the Ability to Prevent It 2

An anonymous reader writes: BGPMon reports on a recent route hijacking event by Syria. These events continue, despite the ability to detect and prevent improper route origination: Resource Public Key Infrastructure. RPKI is technology that allows an operator to validate the proper relationship between an IP prefix and an Autonomous System. That is, assuming you can collect the certificates. ARIN requires operators accept something called the Relying Party Agreement. But the provider community seems unhappy with the agreement, and is choosing not to implement it, just to avoid the RPA, leaving the the Internet as a whole less secure.

Submission + - European Commission updates its open source policy (opensource.com)

jenwike writes: The European Commission wants to make it easier for its software developers to submit patches and add new functionalities to open source projects. Contributing to open source communities will be made central to the EC’s new open source policy, expects Pierre Damas, Head of Sector at the Directorate General for IT (DIGIT). "We use a lot of open source components that we adapt and integrate, and it is time that we contribute back.”

Submission + - 3D map of DNA reveals hidden loops that allow genes to work together (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: Every genome is a miracle of packaging. Somehow a human cell crams two meters of DNA into its tiny nucleus, and yet this tangled mess can carry out the complex task of building and maintaining our bodies. Now, the most detailed look yet at this genomic jumble reveals loops of DNA that bring distant parts of chromosomes together, allowing them to act in concert. The work could help researchers pin down the genetic causes of diseases and help clarify how the genome functions.

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