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Communications

Submission + - The end of l33t speak on forums (custompc.co.uk) 3

arcticstoat writes: "Software developers create a 'StupidFilter' to block out phrases like 'OMGZ hax!!!111one' from forums. Once the software has been installed on a webserver, it will scan posts before they are published for nonsense terms including 'OMG!!' and 'LOL', blocking the worst offenders with a message that says 'This comment is more or less unintelligible. Please try to restate it.'"
Google

Submission + - Linux Mag cuts to the chase about Android

G Adler writes: Linux Magazine's Editor in Chief cuts through the hype about Android and the fabled 'gPhone' to suggest that, though Google's announcement was a bit disappointing, it also gives FOSS a new — and perhaps better — market to slip into.
Google

Submission + - Google at the Gas Pump

sheepoo writes: CNN is reporting that Google has partnered with gas stsaions in the US to provide driving directions, starting early next month.
It's funny.  Laugh.

Submission + - long necks, small heads, bug eyes, large foreheads

nibbles2004 writes: "Producers of the new Star Trek movie are to hold an open casting session for people with "unique" features to appear as extras in the film. The studio said it was interested in people with unique characteristics like "Producers of the new Star Trek movie are to hold an open casting session for people with "unique" features to appear as extras in the film. The studio said it was interested in people with unique characteristics like "long necks, small heads, bug eyes, large foreheads and oversized ears". ". http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/7083123.stm"
The Courts

Submission + - Supreme Court Ruling May Hurt Internet Sales

i_like_spam writes: Without the costs associated with brick-and-mortar establishments, Internet retailers have been able to offer deep discounts to on-line consumers. But this may change. In a 5-4 decision, the US Supreme Court today overruled a 96-year-old antitrust law that prevented the setting of 'price floors' by manufacturers. Under the ruling, manufacturers will be allowed to force price minimums upon distributers and retailers. This may make Internet discounts a thing of the past.

From Atty. Pete Barile:

Importantly, this case points a dagger at the heart of the most consumer-friendly aspects of the Internet. The Internet has shifted power to the consumer in two ways. First, it allows consumers to search for and gather information in a cost-effective, efficient manner. Second, it provides a low-cost means of retailing, making it easy for discounters to offer products to the public. This combination squeezes excess profits and inefficiencies out of product prices. Retail price maintenance seeks to short circuit this extremely consumer friendly process. By setting minimum prices, manufacturers can build in excess margins for themselves and for their favored retailers — prices that consumers have no choice but to pay.

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