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Comment Re:Time for the FreeBSD migration to begin. (Score 1) 76

Ha, interesting, troll and funny. I'd have modded you insightful. I'll probably have to stay off /. for a few days to avoid the responses I'm going to get but what the heck.

I've started using slackware at home for hobby stuff, slackware at work where simple is enough and OpenBSD where I need security. I have a few Debian 7 boxes around still but they are all due to be phased out and replaced by OpenBSD. I love slackware and will continue to use it as long as I can, it always was closer to BSD than a lot of other distros so that helps. But for anything serious I'm *BSD all the way. And you know what? I wish I'd done it years ago, I find that I really do prefer Unix over Linux.

So long Debian, I grew up on you while my son grew up on Toy Story but it's time for both of us to move on.

The Almighty Buck

Universal Basic Income Programs Arrive (theguardian.com) 1052

An anonymous reader writes: Y Combinator will give 100 randomly-selected families in Oakland between $1,000 and $2,000 each month as a test, continuing the payments for between six months and a year. And The Guardian reports that Finland and The Netherlands also are preparing pilot programs to test Universal Basic Income, while Switzerland will vote on a similar program this week. One Australian site is now also asking whether the program could work in Australia, noting that currently the country spends around $3 billion on their Centrelink welfare system, "so simplification can offer huge potential savings."
The Guardian sums up the case for a Universal Basic Income as a reaction to improving technology. "In a future in which robots decimate the jobs but not necessarily the wealth of nations...states should be able to afford to pay all their citizens a basic income unconditional of needs or requirements... In an increasingly digital economy, it would also provide a necessary injection of cash so people can afford to buy the apps and gadgets produced by the new robot workforce."

I'd be curious to hear what Slashdot readers think about the possibility of a government-run Universal Basic Income program.

Comment Re:Why do they remind you of that? (Score 1) 405

It's in TFS...

Social media is unfortunately one of the tools that terrorist groups use to radicalise young people and racist use to spread violence and hatred. This agreement is an important step forward to ensure that the internet remains a place of free and democratic expression, where European values and laws are respected."

You can extrapolate whatever you want from the article and argue that's where this is all heading, we probably agree on a number of points. But you quoted the EU rep out of context to support your point. You don't have to do that, you have a point to make and can do so without willfully ignoring the content of the article.

Comment Re:Why do they remind you of that? (Score 1) 405

AC already beat me too it but to add - it's right there in the summary:

Social media is unfortunately one of the tools that terrorist groups use to radicalise young people and racist use to spread violence and hatred. This agreement is an important step forward to ensure that the internet remains a place of free and democratic expression, where European values and laws are respected."

Nowhere in her quote is their a suggestion that they are doing this out of some need to assuage western guilt as your comment implies.

IMO this isn't really as newsworthy as people are making it out to be. While I don't agree with them European countries have had hate speech laws on their books since the end of WW II. If some American companies want to pander to these laws in order to grow their market or avoid some other regulatory oversight by being a "team player" than it's their prerogative.

I believe it will only make them look bad in the long run as they won't have the resources to follow through and they will invariably make mistakes that will upset people. But again, I don't own those companies (and try to avoid using their products) so it's up to them, they certainly don't care what I think!

Microsoft

Ask Slashdot: Would You Recommend Updating To Windows 10? 982

Plenty of users are skeptical about upgrading to Windows 10. While they understand that Microsoft's newest desktop operating system comes with a range of interesting features, they are paranoid about the repeated update fiascos that have spoiled the experience for many users. Reader Quantus347 writes: Whenever I think of Windows 10 these days I, like so many others out there, immediately feel a swell of rage over the heavy-handed way the "upgrade" has been forced on me and so many others. I had to downgrade one of my computers that installed windows 10 over a weekend I was away, and as a result, I have been fending off the update ever since. I find myself wondering if Windows 10 is actually that bad. With the end of the "free" upgrade period quickly coming to an end, my fiscally conservative side is starting to overwhelm my fear and distrust of all things new, and I'm wondering if it's time to take the leap. I've been burned too many times for being an early adopter of something that proved to be an underdeveloped product, but Windows 10 has been around for long enough that I'm wondering if it might have it's kinks worked out.

So I ask you, Slashdot, what are your experiences with Windows 10 itself, aside from the auto-upgrade nonsense? How does it measure up to its predecessors, and is it a worthwhile OS in its own right?

Comment Re:Ok, why? (Score 2) 311

My understanding is that they didn't even get a DMCA notice from Fox. Content ID is to blame IIUC. I haven't been able to find anything definite but this quote seems to suggest that and I've seen other comments about this story that seem to back that up...

"It's most likely that this is just another example of YouTubeâ(TM)s Content ID system automatically taking down a video without regard to actual copyright ownership and fair use. As soon as FOX broadcast that Family Guy episode, their robots started taking down any footage that appeared to be reposted from the show â" and in this case they took down the footage they stole from an independent creator," Lyon says.

Lyon referring to Jeff Lyon, the CTO of Fight for the Future.

Is anyone really sure that Fox issued a notice and that this isn't just another example of Content ID failing miserably?

Security

Hackers' Website Breached by Hacker (bbc.com) 48

The Nulled, one of the most popular hacker forums with more than 470,000 members has suffered a data breach. As a result of which, email addresses and private messages of all these members have leaked. According to a report on BBC, the leaked data contained more than 5,000 purchase records relating to the exchange of stolen information. From the BBC report: Researchers at Risk Based Security said the data dump contained the "complete forum's database" including 12,600 invoices, usernames, members' PayPal addresses and IP addresses. It also contained millions of forum posts and private messages detailing illegal activities. And some of the data could be used to work out members' identities, if they did not take steps to conceal it. Risk Based Security added the website had used message board software with known vulnerabilities, and the site also used a weak hashing algorithm to protect members' passwords.
It's funny.  Laugh.

Guy Who Didn't Invent Email Sues Gawker For Pointing Out He Didn't Invent Email (techdirt.com) 91

Mike Masnick, reporting for TechDirt: Oh boy. Remember Shiva Ayyadurai? The guy who has gone to great lengths to claim that he "invented email," when the reality is that he appears to have (likely independently) written an early implementation of email long after others had actually "invented email." In the past we've called out examples where gullible press have fallen for his easily debunked claims, but he keeps popping back up. The mainstream press repeated his bogus claims about inventing email after he married a TV star. And, most recently, he decided to scream at the press for memorializing Ray Tomlinson -- someone who actually did have a hand in creating email -- upon his death. [...] We, of course, have not been alone in debunking his claims. Back in 2012, a few weeks after we first debunked them, Gawker's Sam Biddle did a long and thorough takedown of Ayyadurai's claims. Apparently that story really angers Ayyadurai, and I'm guessing that seeing Hulk Hogan win his crazy lawsuit against Gawker helped Ayyadurai to decide to sue Gawker as well.

Comment Re:This (Score 1) 255

Well, again Perl, I read as much of Larry Wall''s writing as I could over the years. The three virtues of programming he espouses are hubris, laziness and impatience.

I think this one falls under the laziness category. Don't spend time solving problems others have already solved. Modern Perl and CPAN really emphasize too. And of course it translates well to other languages and even everyday things that may not even be related to programming.

On the other hand I believe this oversimplifies things a bit. If a library is getting long in the tooth or has some functionality that is still relevant but a lot of legacy baggage that is obsolete then a rewrite is not necessarily a bad thing. Case in point - OpenSSL -> (LibreSSL | Boring SSL)

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