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Comment Re:Recreational drug use versus harm to others (Score 1) 560

Life is too short to be taken so seriously. You sound like you should smile more, or something.

Banishing drugs has failed. It's filled prisons, ruined far more lives than drugs ever will, enriched dictators and corrupted politics.

Drug abuse is a medical problem, often lined to other pathologies. Most drug users have no problems at all. This is born out by the massive amount of drugs consumed by society, legal and illegal. Seriously; do you have any idea how much cocaine, heroin and marijuana are consumed globally?

Driving under the influence, assault, robbery - all are illegal now, with stiff penalties.

People find drugs fun. Provide information on safe use, reduce harm, help addicts. People aren't going to stop taking drugs, because messing with your brain is fun. People have been taking drugs for that purpose for all of recorded history - the only difference is now we know how the drugs work.

This seems very obvious versus the relative insanity of the current drug policy.

Comment Re:No, just no (Score 5, Insightful) 560

Drugs are fun. That's why.

You're going to die, I'm going to die, everyone dies from something. Life is about having fun.

Drugs aren't for everybody, but people like drugs; treat drug abuse as a medical condition, not crime; that approach has failed.

Alcohol, caffeine.. all drugs.

You do what you want. Stop telling other people what's good for them.Live free (and die anyway).

Comment Pull the plug (Score 3, Interesting) 112

I haven't paid for TV in over a decade. I do pay for FTTH, I could get tv for "only" another $20 - no.

Pound sand, Netflix will crush you all.

Eventually the packets will get delegated a utility; the tremendous markup from content funds the inefficient monster that are the tier-1 broadband providers.

Governments should own the infrastructure (fibers on poles). Companies should provide the service. That's the long term fix.

It might not even matter if LTE gets fast and dense enough.. Will kids care?

Comment Re:Fiber infrastructure, everywhere. Starting nort (Score 1) 101

I've deployed networks spanning 30,000+ square kilometers. I know it's possible. It's just not possible for private industry to do at a profit.

Hybrid microwave and fiber is of course the best option - but it is a completely feasible undertaking with the technology available today.

Fiber is uniquely well suited to dealing with horrible environmental conditions; in most of the north, a low-cost option for fiber deployment en masse is probably the best option.

We can build a proper supply highway while we're at it. Canada is one of the largest and most advanced nations on earth. We should act like it.

Comment Fiber infrastructure, everywhere. Starting north. (Score 1) 101

It's a national embarrassment we don't have a proper, high bandwidth, low latency connection to the North. Such should be the price of sovereignty.

Satellite is sold as a viable option, it's not; those are geosync satellites, and they've got huge latency.

Backup? Sure. Primary? No way.

Be nice to see some vision from the PM here; start with the North, extend it to everybody. This is a big country; that makes it expensive - but also very important.

Comment Human knowledge.. isn't that big. (Score 1) 348

Relative to the exponential growth of storage, I'm not worried about this in the least. In my own personal collection I have dozens of lifetimes of information stored. Soon this can be carried in my pocket, offline, if I desire.

A better question is what to do with the petabytes of collected information we're amassing... aside from training our replacements via AI.

Comment Re:Good (Score 1) 420

I used to teach at ITT as well, and it was a joke. We had to follow the pre-made lesson plans, because every instructor was supposed to be able to assume each student who had taken a particular course had learned the exact same material. As you mentioned, the material was riddled with mistakes. Also, the students were woefully unprepared, even the ones who were in their 2nd year. If you gave a test with a matching section, but had a larger answer pool than there were questions, they'd freak out. They also couldn't handle short answer or multiple choice questions where more than one answer could be true (i.e. "select all that apply" types of questions). I'd have one or two students who learned quickly, but the majority were just there because they thought programming was a quick way to get rich and had no business behind a keyboard.

Good riddance.

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