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Comment Re:Terminals in the 1950s? (Score 2) 342

Yes. This is a glaring anachronism. Terminals didn't take over until some time in the 70s. Even in the late 60s multi terminal computers weren't really stable. The predominant model was batch processing. Programs were written by hand, often onto specially ruled coding sheets, and carefully reviewed before being punched into cards, which were ultimately fed into computers. The results would be printed out to be reviewed hours later.

Submission + - US Dept. of Ed: English, History, and Civics Teachers Good Enough for CS Class

theodp writes: In A New Chapter for Computer Science Education, the U.S. Department of Education explained earlier this month that the federal STEM Education Act of 2015 'provides an unprecedented opportunity to fully leverage federal resources' to address large gaps in students’ participation in Advanced Placement (AP) computer science classes based on gender and race. "In three states," lamented the DOE, "not a single female student took the AP computer science exam" (that only 8 boys took the AP CS exam in those same 3 states was apparently not a concern). And the DOE has good news for those hoping to tap Title I and II funds for CS, but don't have any computer science teachers. "A background in math or science isn’t necessarily a requirement to teach CS," explains the Dept. of Ed, "as disciplines like English, history and civics can also provide a solid foundation for teaching CS concepts." So, is "good enough for CS class" the new "good enough for government work"?

Submission + - Kevo smart lock hacked

An anonymous reader writes: Security researchers at NewSky Security recently reported in their blog on how Kevo smart lock can be hacked. 3 kinds of attacks were performed: DOS, DOS via battery drain and Hijack + control the lock.

Submission + - Will Robot Cabs Unjam the Streets? (theatlantic.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Atlantic has a story with some video of a traffic simulator showing just how the roads can be jammed up by people looking for a place to park. (You can play with the simulator too.) This has been suspected for a long time by many traffic researchers and city planners, but the simulator shows just how quickly the roads jam up after just a few of the blocks fill up with parked cars. The good news is that autonomous cars don't need to park-- they just go give someone else a ride. They could change city life forever.

Submission + - Samsung to Push Monthly Over-the-Air Security Updates for Android (securityweek.com)

wiredmikey writes: Smartphone maker Samsung said on Wednesday that it soon will implement a new Android security update process that fast tracks mobile security patches over the air when security vulnerabilities are uncovered. The South Korea-based maker of popular Android smartphones said that it recently fast tracked security updates to its Galaxy devices in response to the recent Android “Stagefright” vulnerabilities uncovered late last month by security firm Zimperium.

News of the initiative is great for Android users. For years, wireless carriers and phone manufacturers have been accused of putting profits over protection and dragging their feet on regular operating system updates, making Android users vulnerable to malware and other attacks.

Submission + - Upgrade to Windows 10 and your kids may no longer be safe (betanews.com)

Mark Wilson writes: Parents who are upgrading their computers to Windows 10 are warned that the move from Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 will obliterate the safety features used to protect children. You may have spent time putting restrictions in place in a bid to keep your offspring safe when using your computer, but Windows 10 will change these child-friendly accounts into standard accounts with no limitations whatsoever.

The upgrade process wipes out website restrictions, game and app age ratings, time limits, and other parental controls and monitoring options. Unless a parent goes to the trouble of reinstating each of these settings individuals, their children will have unfettered computer access. The discovery, revealed by The Register, will come as a surprise to many, but the worry is that many parents will simply be unaware that their children are not protected. And this is far from being the first time Windows 10 has been criticized.

Submission + - 70th Anniversary: The Harrowing Story of the Nagasaki Bombing Mission (thebulletin.org)

Lasrick writes: A typhoon was coming, the fuel pump failed, they had to switch planes, things were wired incorrectly, they missed their rendezvous, they couldn’t see the primary target, they ran out of gas on the way home, and they had to crash-land. But the worst part was when the Fat Man atomic bomb started to arm itself mid-flight.

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