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Comment Re:Take action (Score 5, Insightful) 258

What were you smoking? Win2K Pro was a fucking GREAT OS, rock solid, no eye candy bullshit, it just did what a great OS should do which is STFU and get out of the way so you can run your programs. XP was Fisher Price trash for kiddies, XP X64 (which was really Win 2K3 Workstation, MSFT got wind of so many of us turning 2K3 into desktops they just decided to sell it) was a damn fine OS, 7 is still a kick ass OS, and 8/8.1 is a good OS IF and ONLY IF you strip out the crapstore and spyware garbage and slap on Classic Shell, otherwise its UI will irritate the hell out of you.

But one thing we can all agree on is this...Windows 10 is trash. That is all it is, its trash. It gives you NOTHING better than the previous OSes, even its touted "features" are nothing but datamining trojan horse shit, takes away your ability to keep busted updates (which appears to be damned near a weekly thing with that POS) from being installed, has fucking ADWARE baked into the damned thing, has made BSOD a common condition again which I thought had died with XP, there is honestly not a single positive I can say about that piece of garbage.

Comment Re:The MS Merry Go Round. (Score 5, Interesting) 211

Ain't no suspecting required, just look up Barancles Nerdgasm's "I was fired" video on YouTube. He was part of the testing team and talks about how pretty much all the QA and testing teams for Windows were fired and makes it clear the vibe at Redmond was pretty much Insider for alpha testing, Home and Pro is the beta, Enterprise is the actual product...which is of course the only version you have to rent instead of buy.

This is why I'm telling my customers to stay far away from Win 10 and if they get a new PC with that POS OS? I point them to Win 8 OEM which you can get quite cheaply (and once upgraded to 8.1 with Classic Shell is just Win 7 with some speed tweaks) because even with the new OEM systems it doesn't take more than one or two patches before I'm getting calls that shit is broken.

Now I've had every version of windows since 3.1, including the shitastic WinME and the bloated irritating Vista...Win10 IMHO is the worst product they have EVER came out with bar none. WinME? You could hack in some files from Win98 SE and make it a decent if not good OS. Vista? You could use NLite to chop out the crap and make an okay, not as good as XP X64 but an okay OS for daily use. And of course Win 8/8.1 you could just slap on Classic Shell and take out the crapstore and telemetry crap and its a good solid performer...Win 10? IMHO its not even beta quality, with every update just as much shit gets broke as gets fixed and frankly until Win 10 I had even forgotten what a BSOD looked like simply because how well previous versions past XP handled major errors. Its just not a good OS folks, its buggy, has baked in spyware and ads, it doesn't even look nice, its just a bad product.

Hopefully by the time 8.1 (if not 7) is reaching EOL they will have given Nutella his walking papers, if they haven't? Well I don't think there will be a Windows business to worry about really, it'll just be legacy installs while everyone is on Google or Apple OSes. Ballmer tried to kill the company being a faux Apple, Nutella is trying to finish the job by being a faux Google.

Comment Rarely mentioned on "comparative advantage" theory (Score 1) 332

is that it only applies if there is full employment in both countries and zero cost to labor mobility...
http://internationalecon.com/T...
"The higher price received for each country's comparative advantage good would lead each country to specialize in that good. To accomplish this, labor would have to move from the comparative disadvantaged industry into the comparative advantage industry. This means that one industry goes out of business in each country. However, because the model assumes full employment and costless mobility of labor, all of these workers are immediately gainfully employed in the other industry."

Comment The limits of the Broken Window Fallacy (Score 2) 366

While of course what you say is true as far as it goes (money can be spent either on repairs or on new stuff), here is a way the broken window fallacy can itself be a fallacy.

If almost all the currency in a society is hoarded by the wealthiest 1% (like kept in the "Casino Economy") and the 1% control the government so it refuses to directly print more currency according to the needs of the 99%, then the economy for the 99% functions as if there were a depression due to insufficient currency in the economy of real goods and services.

The health of an economy for most people (as well as the political health of a democracy) is not just how much currency there is, or how fast it moves, but how broadly the currency is distributed. Many average economic indicators may not reflect this economic depression for the 99% due to currency unavailability -- in the same way that if Bill Gates stepped into a homeless shelter by accident, everyone in the building would on average be a millionaire.

For more on the "Casino Economy" or "Gambling Economy" of abstract finance see the section of Money as Debt II starting around here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?...

In such a circumstance (which is close to the economy we have now), if a window breaks that a wealthy person or the government wants to fix, then some of the hoarded and speculated cash from the Casino economy may be leaked into the real economy of the 99%. This would temporarily alleviate a tiny bit of the ongoing defacto economic depression until the money is sucked back into the ever expanding Casino economy again via interest on debt or other forms of rent-seeking. Someone breaking a to-be-replaced window of a wealthy person or government in such a situation is then engaging in an indirect form of theft. WWII was another example that led to increased government spending and progressive taxation in the USA, although to great human suffering across the globe in other ways.

To be clear, breaking a window that needs to be repaired by the 99% does not have this currency redistribution effect since no additional currency will be moved from the casino economy to the real economy. Then we are just left with the fallacy in its standard form -- not the fallacy in the limiting case of concentrated hoarded wealth.

Of course, in practice, things getting broken only gives excuses for future crackdowns on "terrorists" and the diversion of what little cash is left circulating in the real economy for the 99% into new taxes for a larger security apparatus to protect the windows of the 1%, so ultimately the path of breaking windows is likely self-defeating.

Better options include alternative currencies, local exchange trading systems (LETS), an improved gift economy like via free software and shared knowledge like with Slashdot, improved local subsistence production like via 3D printing or home gardening robots like Farmbot, better democratic processes leading to better government planning, and political change towards a basic income (with the BI funded by progressive taxation and rents on resource extraction or government-granted monopolies like broadcast spectrum use). I discuss those and more options here:
http://pdfernhout.net/beyond-a...

Comment Re:It's the OS that just keeps on giving (Score 2) 220

Nope, sorry, but bullshit. those wonderful Linux netbooks? Yeah they saw 400% hbigher returns than the ones with Windows so the second MSFT gave companies a decent price on XP and later Win 7? They quit selling the ones with the OS that was costing them money, simple as that.

As for why netbooks died out? The companies decided they wanted more profit so they made them bigger, added more bells and whistles, and priced themselves out of the market, simple as that. When netbooks were $179-$299? I couldn't keep 'em in stock but by the end they were selling AMD duals for $450 and the Atoms for $349...who is gonna pay that when they could get a full size laptop with better performance for $279?

Why Linux fans can't seem to grasp such a simple concept is frankly beyond me but the reason Linux doesn't go anywhere whether its installed by default or not (see Linux netbooks, the Walmart Linux desktops and laptops, the Dell Ubuntu laptops) is called the network effect with Windows literally being listed as an example of the network effect in action. Its really VERY simple, people buy computers to run specific programs not for the OS that is on it and those programs? They are written for Windows. Hell most users don't even know which version of windows they have, if they even know they have windows, all they know is they install their program and it works and if it doesn't? the PC is BROKEN and worthless, period.

So if you want people to actually use your OS? Then you have to get all those proprietary vendors to support your OS although with the hatred of all things proprietary in Linux land I don't see that happening, hence why MSFT has put out 3 stinkers in a row and Linux hasn't gained squat. As long as their programs run? People would gladly take Windows over your OS, MSFT could put the Eye Of Sauron as the desktop wallpaper and they would not care, all they will care about is their programs work on windows, they don't on yours...end of story.

Comment Re:Good to hear. (Score 1) 188

Not interesting on price you say? Well I'd really like to you show me an Intel at $135 that gets these kinds of numbers because the last time I checked all you can get from Intel for $135 is a crappy Pentium dual or an even crappier Atom. When you look at the bang for the buck it really isn't even close, I mean you can get an octocore from AMD for around $135 that has a 4Ghz turbo clock OOTB and which can easily hit 4.4Ghz-4.6Ghz on air, you aren't gonna find anything from Intel that competes until you at least double the price. Then when you look at motherboards and see how you can get a much nicer motherboard for less when you go AMD? Its really a no brainer, you can get a hell of a lot nicer system for a lot less money by going AMD.

This isn't even bringing up the elephant in the room which is that software hasn't kept up with hardware in quite a few years so even for gaming you can pair that chip with a $200 GPU and enjoy your games at 1080P with maxxed out graphics and high FPS, and for those that don't game one of the AMD APUs will give them all the power they need while having excellent picture quality and hardware accelerated video and both will spend a lot less.

Comment Re: Fuse (Score 1) 128

Allow me to plug BLU phones....GREAT phones! They do NOT put in any OEM crap, just stock Android (or Windows Phone if you want one of those) and their forums show you how to root any of their phones. They are also built like tanks, have models from $50 to $400 so they have a model for everybody, good battery life, just really damned good affordable phones.

So anybody that just wants a good stock android phone at a good price? You can't go wrong with the BLU phones, I've switched everybody in my family to BLUs and have never regretted it, reliable hassle free stock android.

Comment Re:Hmmm. (Score 2, Insightful) 58

I guess "Windows isn't done unless Lotus won't run" by your logic is completely reasonable behavior, it WAS their OS...right?

Or maybe if you'd stop waving your little Intel flag as hard as your squeeing fangirl ass can you'd know they didn't "not optimize" for other chips, they purposely designed their compiler to put out broken code on other chips so badly in fact that you could take a Via CPU (the only CPU that allows you to change the CPUID in software) and by simply changing the CPUID from "Centaur Hauls" to "Genuine Intel" you magically got a 30% performance boost...wow, the power of of CPUID huh?

Of course what it really was was a classic case of "Windows isn't done unless Lotus won't run" and this kind of behavior is typical of Intel, hence why they had to shell out 1.4 billion for market rigging and anti competitive behavior in the EU just 2 years ago. Would you like a quote from the judgement?

"The Commission demonstrated to the requisite legal standard that Intel attempted to conceal the anti-competitive nature of its practices and implemented a long term comprehensive strategy to foreclose AMD from the strategically most important sales channels. ... The General Court considers that none of the arguments raised by Intel supports the conclusion that the fine imposed is disproportionate. On the contrary, it must be considered that that fine is appropriate in the light of the facts of the case.

In other words the exact same shit MSFT got busted for and frankly they should get no less than what MSFT did, 10 years of being monitored by the courts to keep them from pulling shit like this again.

Comment Re:Nokia was going downhill well before that (Score 0) 88

Nope they were already well and truly fucked. they had not one, not two, but THREE different OSes, Symbian, MeeGo, and the Java based one I can never remember the name of. All three OSes were headhunting the other's teams, fighting for resources, and brown nosing the PHBs in various departments. What this did was basically split the company into three separate fiefdoms, where each group not only fought to make sure THEIR OS was the "future" but fucked any and all cooperation in the company as badly as Sega Of America VS Japan in the late 90s and we all saw what the result of that was, didn't we?

Elop honestly didn't have a choice, because there was three different toxic factions in the company his only choice was to go outside the company or else he would have to pretty much fire everyone and start over because after years of fighting for "their OS" to "win"? If he would have chosen one of the ones being made in house he would have had two thirds of the development groups actively trying to fuck the "winning team" as it had just gotten too nasty.

Comment Name it Chiron for Hogan's Voyage from Yesteryear (Score 2) 347

James P. Hogan's comments from: https://web.archive.org/web/20...
=====
An Earth set well into the next century is going through one of its periodical crises politically, and it looks as if this time they might really press the button for the Big One. If it happens, the only chance for our species to survive would be by preserving a sliver of itself elsewhere, which in practical terms means another star, since nothing closer is readily habitable. There isn't time to organize a manned expedition of such scope from scratch. However, a robot exploratory vessel is under construction to make the first crossing to the Centauri system, and it with a crash program it would be possible to modify the designs to carry sets of human genetic data coded electronically. Additionally, a complement of incubator/nanny/tutor robots can be included, able to convert the electronic data back into chemistry and raise/educate the ensuing offspring while others prepare surface habitats and supporting infrastructure, when a habitable world is discovered. By the time we meet the "Chironians," their culture is into its fifth generation.

In the meantime, Earth went through a dodgy period, but managed in the end to muddle through. The fun begins when a generation ship housing a population of thousands arrives to "reclaim" the colony on behalf of the repressive, authoritarian regime that emerged following the crisis period. The Mayflower II brings with it all the tried and tested apparatus for bringing a recalcitrant population to heel: authority, with its power structure and symbolism, to impress; commercial institutions with the promise of wealth and possessions, to tempt and ensnare; a religious presence, to awe and instill duty and obedience; and if all else fails, armed military force to compel. But what happens when these methods encounter a population that has never been conditioned to respond?

The book has an interesting corollary. Around about the mid eighties, I received a letter notifying me that the story had been serialized in an underground Polish s.f. magazine. They hadn't exactly "stolen" it, the publishers explained, but had credited zlotys to an account in my name there, so if I ever decided to take a holiday in Poland the expenses would be covered (there was no exchange mechanism with Western currencies at that time). Then the story started surfacing in other countries of Eastern Europe, by all accounts to an enthusiastic reception. What they liked there, apparently, was the updated "Ghandiesque" formula on how bring down an oppressive regime when it's got all the guns. And a couple of years later, they were all doing it!

So I claim the credit. Forget all the tales you hear about the contradictions of Marxist economics, truth getting past the Iron Curtain via satellites and the Internet, Reagan's Star Wars program, and so on.

In 1989, after communist rule and the Wall came tumbling down, the annual European s.f. convention was held at Krakow in southern Poland, and I was invited as one of the Western guests. On the way home, I spent a few days in Warsaw and at last was able to meet the people who had published that original magazine. "Well, fine," I told them. "Finally, I can draw out all that money that you stashed away for me back in '85. One of the remarked-too hastily--that "It was worth something when we put it in the bank." (There had been two years of ruinous inflation following the outgoing regime's policy of sabotaging everything in order to be able to prove that the new ideas wouldn't work.) I said, resignedly, "Okay. How much are we talking about?" The one with a calculator tapped away for a few seconds, looked embarrassed, and announced, "Eight dollars and forty-three cents." So after the U.S. had spent trillions on its B-52s, Trident submarines, NSA, CIA, and the rest--all of it.

Comment Other ideas on dealing with social hurricanes (Score 1) 264

http://pdfernhout.net/on-deali...
"This approximately 60 page document is a ramble about ways to ensure the CIA (as well as other big organizations) remains (or becomes) accountable to human needs and the needs of healthy, prosperous, joyful, secure, educated communities. The primarily suggestion is to encourage a paradigm shift away from scarcity thinking & competition thinking towards abundance thinking & cooperation thinking within the CIA and other organizations. I suggest that shift could be encouraged in part by providing publicly accessible free "intelligence" tools and other publicly accessible free information that all people (including in the CIA and elsewhere) can, if they want, use to better connect the dots about global issues and see those issues from multiple perspectives, to provide a better context for providing broad policy advice. It links that effort to bigger efforts to transform our global society into a place that works well for (almost) everyone that millions of people are engaged in. A central Haudenosaunee story-related theme is the transformation of Tadodaho through the efforts of the Peacemaker from someone who was evil and hurtful to someone who was good and helpful. ..."

Comment Here is what I don't get... (Score 0) 706

If it was ANYBODY else that you were given the same insanely huge list of "suicides" all connected to this one person? You'd say they were either a serial killer or obviously mobbed up....yet with the Clintons people just keep making excuses, why?

If you have one person die under mysterious circumstances that is terrible, 3 could be a coincidence, but over SIXTY DEAD, all either victims of "suicide" or "botched robberies" where nothing was taken and they are shot execution style? I'm sorry but anybody who doesn't accept the fact that the Clintons have racked up a body count is frankly delusional at this point. If I had to guess I'd say the Clintons got real chummy with the spooks running dope for the Contras out of Mena in the 70s and 80s and still have their numbers on speed dial.

Comment Re:Shoot the Messenger (Score 1) 407

It was DAMN good but VERY gritty so if you can't handle some gore? Then its not for you. it literally starts with the new guy being handed a bucket and told to "clean out the mess" which just so happens to be what is left of the guy who had his job previously after the body bag is removed, complete with a chunk of his face stuck to the wall. and the first time the new guy is in combat he freezes and people die, again just like what most of us would do when suddenly bullets and bombs are flying everywhere.

But there really are no "good guys" in that movie, everyone has some good quality and some truly despicable ones...just like IRL in war there is no heroes, only casualties...damned good movie.

Comment Re:Pot calling kettle. Come in kettle! (Score 2) 260

Frankly the studios SHOULD be sued for false advertising because increasingly what you see in the trailer isn't even in the film, so how can you say its anything but false advertising when you sell a product based on content it doesn't actually have?

Remember Fan4stic with those cool scenes of The Thing jumping out a plane and kicking ass? Not in the movie. Jonah Hex, Green Lantern, they tried to sell the movies with action scenes that simply did not exist in the final cut.

To use a /. car analogy if I sold you on this new car by showing you pics of this tricked out chromed up engine, only for you to get it home and find I swapped it out with a used nasty looking 4 banger you'd be pissed, wouldn't you? Well I don't see how this is any different, as for nearly a century a trailer is the "best of" reel to get people excited for a film but now increasingly its nothing but bullshit that doesn't even exist in the movie.

Comment From US GSA 18F on security and open source... (Score 1) 61

From: https://18f.gsa.gov/2014/11/26...

Security and open source

"System security should not depend on the secrecy of the implementation or its components."
-- Guide to General Server Security, National Institute of Standards and Technology

A codebase is a terrible secret.

Because a codebase is so large, it cannot easily be changed. Furthermore, it must be known, or at least knowable, to the large number of people who work on it, so it cannot be kept secret very easily. This is represented at the bottom of figures two and three. Therefore "security through obscurity" is a terrible idea when it comes to a codebase. In most cases your system will consist of code which you reuse as well as code that your write yourself. Therefore both of these types of code should be open.

Of course, your system will have secrets in most cases -- keys, passwords, and the like -- but you should assume they have been discovered and change them often. We call these secrets a "red thread", because, like a red thread in a white handkerchief, they should be as vivid and thin as possible. By making them thin, such as a single password, you make them very easy to change and keep secret. Although these secrets are tiny, they must be managed carefully and conscientiously. We believe this concept is so important that we have placed it on our reusable version of the Wardley-Duncan map linked to above.

There are risks of defects and complexity associated with using open source modules indiscriminately. There are also security vulnerabilities to any system, either through negligence or by the intention of a bad actor. The key to preventing this is code review.

You must make sure that each component you use is code reviewed. In practice this means either that you must use very popular projects whose code is looked at by a large number of people on a regular basis, or you must use small projects which your team can code review itself. In practice, the criteria for making this decision for reused components is similar to the rules of thumb that we have already laid down for managing risk.However, you may need to adjust these rules of thumb based on how often you plan to update the component.

For example, a small component which is very stable need not be updated at all. If it is small and you can code review it or pay a team to code review it, then you may use it. On the other hand if the project has frequent updates, your team will have to decide how to manage these updates. A large project may have both stable and experimental branches. In general your team will want to update as frequently as the major number of the branch. If the project is very active and many people are looking at it, this does not represent a security risk. If however a project is changing rapidly and producing many releases and your team does not have the resources to ensure that each new release is code reviewed and you do not trust the community to do so, then you probably should not use that component.

With an open source component, it is at least possible to understand how much code review it is receiving.We know of no way to do this for closed source code kept as a secret.A firm which is asked to maintain the security of the code that it has written is placed in a conflict of interest. It isn't in its short-term interest to spend resources on this code review, and it is not in its short-term interest to admit defects.

Security of your own code

Make all your code open and examinable from the start. Moreover, it is best to encourage as many people to look at it, because the more people who seriously review the code the more likely a security flaw is to be found. Programmers will code more securely when their code is in the public's eye from the beginning.

Code that you write or contract to have written should be open source from the start, because it relieves you of the terrible risk and burden of maintaining the secrecy of the codebase. This means not only that it is published under an open source license as explained in our open source policy, but that it is published in a modern source code control system.

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