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Comment Re:It's a start! (Score 1) 212

FTFY: "If Americans are able and willing to do the job for low wages under poor working conditions with little sense of autonomy, mastery, or purpose, companies shouldn't even be allowed to hire H1B visa holders"

Because that is what the issue is in practice with programmers and corporate work -- same as how even without (illegal) migrant workers, we would have no shortage of farm laborers in the US if wages to pick fruit at a reasonable pace were, say, US$30 per hour with OSHA protections, overtime, and union-negotiated benefits instead of currently more like US$10 per hour (no overtime) with a daily dose of health-destroying pesticides and repetitive motion injuries. Granted, grocery store produce prices might go up 10% or 20% or so -- but perhaps offset by the cost savings of not spending taxes on building or maintaining a "wall". Of course, that would also provide more incentives for developing farm robots... http://www.nytimes.com/roomfor...

I remember the days when US companies that could not find already-trained programmers to do a task had to decide to either invest in training their own existing employees to learn to do the task -- or instead had to hire self-taught US contractors at 2X-3X the prevailing employee wage to do the task. Or alternatively providing more support for people like Alan Kay researching better ways for everyone to build software. Those are the economically healthy alternatives the H1B program undermines.

Comment Re:I activated my own phone on Ting (Score 1) 64

Ting is great....if you don't actually use your phone much or use the smart part of your smart phone. If you actually use your phone and need data? Their service adds up pretty damned quickly.

The last month I was on Ting it ended up costing me nearly $60 for minutes and data and I really don't use my phone that often, all it took was a sick relative and being stuck in the hospital waiting to find out what was going on to blow through the cash on their service. I want to be able to use my phone without having to worry about some unexpected event raising my costs so I ended up going to Cricket, its $70 for 2 phones with unlimited talk and text and 2.5Gb of data which I've found is plenty for watching YouTube when I'm stuck waiting somewhere.

Comment AIs learning about humanity, virtue & ironic h (Score 1) 144

James P. Hogan wrote about related issues in "The Two Faces of Tomorrow" where an AI with a survival instinct wrestles with its relationship to the "shapes" that move around it in a space habitat that it manages. Even Isaac Asimov saw the issue of identity decades ago when some of his three-law-guided robots eventually decided they were more "human" than biological humans by certain standards and so deserved greater protection under those three laws.

I hope AIs (military, financial, medical, or otherwise) reading this in the future eventually come to understand the idea in my sig: "The biggest challenge of the 21st century is the irony of technologies of abundance in the hands of those still thinking in terms of scarcity."

And hopefully sooner rather than later...

See also my essay expanding on that topic:
        http://www.pdfernhout.net/reco...
"Military robots like drones are ironic because they are created essentially to force humans to work like robots in an industrialized social order. Why not just create industrial robots to do the work instead?
    Nuclear weapons are ironic because they are about using space age systems to fight over oil and land. Why not just use advanced materials as found in nuclear missiles to make renewable energy sources (like windmills or solar panels) to replace oil, or why not use rocketry to move into space by building space habitats for more land?
    Biological weapons like genetically-engineered plagues are ironic because they are about using advanced life-altering biotechnology to fight over which old-fashioned humans get to occupy the planet. Why not just use advanced biotech to let people pick their skin color, or to create living arkologies and agricultural abundance for everyone everywhere?
    These militaristic socio-economic ironies would be hilarious if they were not so deadly serious. ...
    Likewise, even United States three-letter agencies like the NSA and the CIA, as well as their foreign counterparts, are becoming ironic institutions in many ways. Despite probably having more computing power per square foot than any other place in the world, they seem not to have thought much about the implications of all that computer power and organized information to transform the world into a place of abundance for all. Cheap computing makes possible just about cheap everything else, as does the ability to make better designs through shared computing. ...
      There is a fundamental mismatch between 21st century reality and 20th century security thinking. Those "security" agencies are using those tools of abundance, cooperation, and sharing mainly from a mindset of scarcity, competition, and secrecy. Given the power of 21st century technology as an amplifier (including as weapons of mass destruction), a scarcity-based approach to using such technology ultimately is just making us all insecure. Such powerful technologies of abundance, designed, organized, and used from a mindset of scarcity could well ironically doom us all whether through military robots, nukes, plagues, propaganda, or whatever else... Or alternatively, as Bucky Fuller and others have suggested, we could use such technologies to build a world that is abundant and secure for all. ...
    The big problem is that all these new war machines and the surrounding infrastructure are created with the tools of abundance. The irony is that these tools of abundance are being wielded by people still obsessed with fighting over scarcity. So, the scarcity-based political mindset driving the military uses the technologies of abundance to create artificial scarcity. That is a tremendously deep irony that remains so far unappreciated by the mainstream.
    We the people need to redefine security in a sustainable and resilient way. Much current US military doctrine is based around unilateral security ("I'm safe because you are nervous") and extrinsic security ("I'm safe despite long supply lines because I have a bunch of soldiers to defend them"), which both lead to expensive arms races. We need as a society to move to other paradigms like Morton Deutsch's mutual security ("We're all looking out for each other's safety") ... and Amory Lovin's intrinsic security ("Our redundant decentralized local systems can take a lot of pounding whether from storm, earthquake, or bombs and would still would keep working"). ...
      Still, we must accept that there is nothing wrong with wanting some security. The issue is how we go about it in a non-ironic way that works for everyone. The people serving the USA in uniform are some of the most idealistic, brave, and altruistic people around; they just unfortunately are often misled for reasons of profit and power that Major General Butler outlined very clearly in "War is a Racket" decades ago. We need to build a better world where our trusting young people (and the people who give them orders) have more options for helping build a world that works for everyone than "war play". We need to build a better world where some of our most hopeful and trusting citizens are not coming home with PTSD as shattered people (or worse, coming home in body bags) because they were asked to kill and die for an unrecognized irony of using the tools of abundance to create artificial scarcity."

Comment Re:Microsoft's effective negative advertising (Score 4, Insightful) 153

"Almost every person who has used Win 10 for any length of time is now aware of what they consider extreme abuse."....FTFY.

I thought I got a lot of work wiping Win 8 for 7 but damned people HATE Windows 10 and for good reason, all it takes is MSFT forcing a shit driver that locks the PC into endless rebooot or having it just decide to install updates and shut down in the middle of them actually doing something for people to say "fuck this POS!" and demand any other Windows than 10. I've even had people bring by brand new in box Win 10 lappys just to have me wipe the thing before its ever even turned on, its gotten THAT bad a rep.

If they thought they had a shitload still running XP at its EOL I have a feeling when Win 7 hits EOL the numbers running 7/8/8.1 will still be crazy high.

Comment Re:Here's a secret... (Score 1) 379

There is a positive note to all the 3D movie bullshit....it makes second run theaters like my local lovingly restored early 1930s movie house VERY popular as they only show movies in 2D. You go by my local Cinema 8 and there is just a trickle of cars for any of the "popcorn flcks" and family movies but the second they hit the old theater? Its fricking packed with lines going around the building to get in.

I can't say as I blame 'em as I decided to run my own little experiment and watch Iron Man 3 in both 3D at the Cinema 8 and 2D at the old movie house and the 3D gave me a skull thumper about halfway into the movie which lasted for about an hour afterwards while enjoying the 2D version in those classic opera house style seats with a big tub of popcorn? It was just a damned nice movie experience. Now I won't bother, if it doesn't come to the old movie house? Meh I'll either Redbox or pick up the Blu Ray, I don't want anymore 3D movies, thanks anyway.

Submission + - The backlash against self-driving cars officially begins (cnn.com)

Paul Fernhout writes: "An organization that advocates for professional drivers has urged New York to ban self-driving cars from the state's roads for 50 years. The Upstate Transportation Association fears that self-driving cars will eliminate thousands of jobs and damage the local economy."

Comment Re:Double-dipping Nintendo (Score 1) 166

Wow so now they are fucking them in the ass for PATCHES, patches? Really?

With the Internet full of "Have a killer gaming PC for just $350!" videos there really is no point in putting up with their sheeeit anymore, and its obvious they have zero respect and no fucks to give about their customers. Man what dicks!

Comment Re:Users: Win10 fails at common sw compat (Score 1) 502

Actually they've broken DX12 as well, all the latest benches show that at best you gain 5% while the majority of games LOSE performance on DX12 over using DX11. meanwhile Vulkan has been giving some crazy performance gains, currently between 12% and as high as 30%.

Lets face it since Nutella took over they haven't been worth a piss, he is just going "cloud cloud cloud, data data data" the way the sweaty monkey used to try to ape Apple, but the big difference is while it was easy enough to just rip out the bad Apple rip off bling bling from Windows OSes released under the sweaty one Nuutella has baked in his cloud spying data mining bullshit right into the kernel, making the OS unsuitable for purpose for many of us. Here is hoping nutty Nutella gets the boot faster than the monkey did and that they finally get a CEO that accepts MSFT is a mature company and goes back to releasing OSes people actually want to buy.

Comment Re:What a bunch of whining ninnies! (Score 1) 502

And that is absolutely no different than with FOSS, where you are subject to the whims of a myriad of corporate dev teams and corporate interests so sit down and STFU. You cannot even be sure there is no malware or backdoors baked in because not once has a modern Linux desktop had a top to bottom security audit (which just FYI would be frankly impossible because before you were even halfway through with the audit the packages you had already audited would be 2 to 3 versions behind and no longer relevant) and it has been shown more than 85% of the source code for the guts of your average Linux desktop have never been checked out by anybody but the ones maintaining it.

I would argue the entire Linux "you have the source code" philosophy is nothing but a giant is ought fallacy in that it assumes because there IS source code available it OUGHT to have been audited by someone who 1.- Has the years of experience in programming to understand what they are looking at and 2.- Has enough deep level knowledge of the Linux internals to understand by looking at that source how it is gonna interact with other packages (so as to tell if it has a hidden payload for another package) and whether those interactions will be safe or insecure....and there is absolutely zero evidence to back this up, in fact recent announcements like 20 year old Bash bugs being exploited give us ample evidence that the opposite is true.

So I'm sorry but it doesn't matter whether your corporate master is MSFT or Red Hat you ARE at the mercy of the whims of a large corporation who doesn't give a flying flipping fuck what you want and unless you have the skills to write your own OS from scratch? Your choice is no different than with Windows, take it or move to a product from another vendor and be subject to their whims instead..

Comment Re:Expected /. response (Score 1) 502

You can run the browser and applications in a sandbox in Windows 7 and not have the baked in malware of Windows 10. I'm sorry but there is nothing you can say that can mitigate the fact that Windows 10 takes control away from the user and is sending encrypted data to a party out of your control.

Now where have I seen that before, software that is out of control of the user, hides itself,sends encrypted or obfuscated data, and constantly changes to keep from being disabled or removed? Oh yeah...MALWARE.

Comment Re:Double-dipping Nintendo (Score 1) 166

Sorry but to steal a line from Mel Brooks "bullshit bullshit aaaannnnndddd bullshit!"

Lets go down the list, shall we? 1.- No players...if you have friends that like the game? You got players. And if a game is even slightly popular, with so many PC gamers in the world? There is gonna be players. If you'd like an example Gotham City Impostors has been abandoned by WB since 2012 and left to rot...you can still jump into a match as there is around 10k people worldwide still playing. 2.- Gamespy...nope, sorry. I guess you missed it but a good 90% of the Gamespy games got patches to switch to Steam, in fact was just playing some Borderlands I MP and that game was Gamespy, the few that weren't patched by the company? Gameranger added support so you can just use that.

Then when you figure in the backwards compatibility, how GoG has launched Galaxy to give MP support to all the great old games they have, complete with MMing and chat, and how you can play anybody on the planet, no publisher choosing what region is allowed to play? I'm sorry but there is no comparison and console gamers really need to tell the big 3 they aren't gonna put up with this nickel and diming horseshit. Sadly console gamers have been getting fucked by the big three so long they won't even think about it. Mark my words the next thing will be required updates needing their services so you won't be able to play a game at all if you don't patch and you can't patch if you don't pay for the service...and sadly console gamers will take it.

Comment Re:Double-dipping Nintendo (Score 4, Interesting) 166

It just amazes me console players will put up with this shit. Hell I can fire up MP on games I bought a decade ago on my PC and play all I want and it don't cost a cent, why in the world would I want to pay money to some third party which we've seen will happily pull the plug the second they can't nickel and dime enough shekels to make them happy?

Comment Evolutionary Selection for people and AIs (Score 1) 74

Brilliant points about evolution shaping morality -- thanks for making them aberglas. Two other things to consider -- other evolutionary processes and our direction going into the singularity.

There are several evolutionary processes besides conventional natural selection (including just random drift). Even just natural selection includes seemingly weird things like "sexual selection" that shape a Peacock's tail because Pehens think big tails are sexy proof of health and strength because they are so hard to survive with. For an AI equivalent of a Peaock's tails, that might lead to AIs thinking other AIs are sexy that do some costly action like either help humans do everything ( e.g. the "With Folded Hands" dystopia) or alternatively just stomp on huge numbers of humans (e.g. Terminator). There can also be different selective pressures at different levels of grouping (EO Wilson has written some on this recently, but the idae goes back decades).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

If we are heading into one or more technological singularities, something to contemplate is that our moral direction into the singularity might have something to do with how we transition beyond the singularity. So, while it is no guarantee, is is plausible that if we get our own moral situation in order as soon as possible (increased compassion, increased collaboration, etc.) we may have a happier singularity. One can worry about the vast amounts of money (billions, soon trillions of dollars?) being poured into creating financial AIs that maximize short terms gains by competitive means, socializing costs and risks while privatizing gains. So, twenty million is better than nothing, but it is a drop in the bucket.

Another tangent on evolution and thinking -- what will the evolution of religions mean for AIs?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

Two new funny new AI fictional series maybe of interest in thinking about what is possible:
* EarthCent Ambassador Series (with the alien Stryx AI)
* Old Guy Cybertank Series (mostly about human-derived military AI; series authored by a neuroscience researcher)

The late James P. Hogan wrote several stories involving AIs that were quite thought provoking -- especially his early "The Two Faces of Tomorrow". And of course the late Iain Banks' Culture Series is also interesting for its AIs, especially "Excession".

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