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Comment Re:Life's unfair (Score 1) 243

There doesn't need to be any unfairness here, FWIW. Well, OK, maybe if you want everyone to be part of the exact same MMORPG, but if that's not an issue (simple arena matches), why not have servers... all across the world? Including Hawaii? Each player just connects to the lowest latency server available to them to play with others connected to that server?

Doesn't that pretty much fix the problem?

Comment Re:Coordination, not more text (Score 2) 163

Let's see the same story, as published by the Squiggleslash Gazette:

Today Jimmy Wales, known for eating children, announced a new web site whose job will be collecting articles critical of the Trump administration, identifying journalists who are critics of the regime, so that Wales can go to their homes and murder them one by one.

There. That should satisfy for wish for multiple viewpoints. Questions for you:

1. Is it remotely accurate?
2. Is it more true than the summary or the article linked to?
3. Is the truth "somewhere in the middle": the original article says nothing about Wales murdering anyone, so is just a little bit of a child murderer, and is he maybe going to go to Journalists homes and just slightly murder them?
4. Is the viewpoint of the Squiggleslash Gazette worth even a split second of your time?
5. When you read the version of the story, as reported by the Squiggleslash Gazette, were you more informed, or did it make you dumber?

Compare two articles reporting on global warming. One quotes scientists, and accurately reports that the consensus within the scientific community is that smoking causes lung cancer The other fails to report that consensus, and includes only interviews with two denialists, both of whom superficially have qualifications related to health (maybe a practicing family doctor, and the director of a think tank's healthcare policy division) but neither of whom reflect the views of the majority of scientists studying in the area, and who have been found, repeatedly, to lie or misrepresent evidence. The second article presents the views of the denialists as either mainstream within medical science, or normal within science as if there's a legitimate dispute.

Is the truth "somewhere in the middle" for those two articles? Does it help you reach an informed decision to include exposure to information known to be false, without being told it's false? Are you helped if you're essentially lied to?

Comment Re:I hate them all (Score 1) 195

T-Mobile neglected to mention the "Regulatory Compliance Fees" that added $15/mo to my bill (and made them look like taxes when they're not, and no, they're not the fees for giving poor folks phone access, those have a separate line item)

That's pretty much true of all cellular companies, I've never come across one until recently that doesn't outright lie about their prices, omitting stuff like the universal service fee that's actually a cost of doing business. They lobby quite extensively to the FCC to get the FCC to agree they should be able to lie about their prices in their ads by omitting various costs-of-doing-business and adding them to bills as mandatory add-ons.

The one carrier that doesn't? Well... actually it's T-Mobile. No, not accusing you of lying, you were right up until a few months ago, it's just they've finally started to be honest about it with their T-Mobile One plan, where the prices quoted are all-inclusive.

Comment Re:Wow. (Score 1) 195

Yes Sir, that's another one of our great hits! Between you me and the fence post, we're also looking into commissioning a pilot for a new show called NCIS:Cyber, featuring the Naval Criminal Intelligence agencies that protect our brave Marines from hackers.

Also, I don't know if you like to laugh (who doesn't?) but we're looking for some top notch comedy writers for our humorous look at the "science" world, The Big Bang Theory. If you think you have what it takes, and are familiar with the kinds of shows nerds watch, like The Star Trek, and Firebug, send us your resume and some samples of your work, and maybe you can join our writing team!

- LM

Comment Re:Still a dream (Score 1) 148

It's almost certainly a hell of a lot easier to build a self-driving flying car than it is to build a self driving regular car. Regular cars have to follow roads, watch for people in unexpected places, adapt to road works, etc. Flying cars just need a rough direction to go in, and the ability to detect obstacles, with three dimensions to move around in to dodge them.

If that weren't the case, and we weren't able to create a self driving technology, I'd still question the logic that it's somehow more difficult to manually control something like this than it is a regular car. Why? What makes it harder?

Comment Re:Wow. (Score 1) 195

Hi, sorry to butt in but I'm Leslie Moonves, the President of CBS. After reading this, I'm convinced you're the right person to become the new showrunner of our hit show "<\Scorpion". You obviously know the cyber, which makes you more than qualified. Please email me as soon as possible.

PS: You guys like being paid in "Bitcons", right?

Comment Re:Cox has low customer satisfaction? (Score 1) 97

Yeah, I know why they're hated as a cable TV company, but the ISP side of Comcast has always been pretty decent in my experience, and I don't know anyone who has anything bad to say about that side of them. Sure, the data caps is an ongoing concern, but they haven't implemented anything evil on that side, beyond introducing the concept to begin with.

Comment Re:Libreoffice is a thing (Score 1) 216

git is a tiny fraction of what's needed to replace OneDrive - unsurprising given it's a source code version control/management system. If you were to start from scratch creating a OneDrive alternative, you'd probably start with Apache, not git. Add versioning and more advanced permissions to Apache's WebDAV implementation, a web interface to the same directory (preferably linked to something capable of at least viewing Word etc documents online), and client tools to sync with Apache, and you're pretty close to being there.

Comment Re:Libreoffice is a thing (Score 2, Insightful) 216

This is about Microsoft's non-subscription version of Office being able to access the corporate version of OneDrive, so LibreOffice won't help here.

It'd be interesting to see the FOSS community come up with an equivalent to OneDrive (if we could somehow do it without needing a central server, that'd be a major step forward) but a FOSS office suite isn't going to help.

Comment Re:Time to switch (Score 1) 216

Those will still work with the business version of OneDrive after 2020? Or did you misunderstand the summary and think Microsoft is deactivating Office 2016 in 2020 completely?

What Microsoft is announcing is relatively obscure and probably won't affect many people at all. Home users will be completely unaffected. Businesses are largely moving over to Office 365 anyway, the combination of "Corporate OneDrive + non-subscription Office" is pretty unusual.

Switching over to the Mac (or, more easily, to LibreOffice/OpenOffice) won't help in the slightest.

Comment Re:Do you code? (Score 1, Interesting) 385

Also you have interface complexity. Adding these features requires some way to use the features, possibly including configuration options, menu items, hotkeys and so on. Prior to the Ribbon, Microsoft tried to fix this in Word by hiding all the menu items you had not used yet, so you'd never know those features were there to be used. My boss constantly asks me to remove menu items and "simplify" but he never has any answers on where he thinks users should go to access those features if they're no longer in the menu. Relevant Dilbert.

Comment Re:Why would he care? (Score 4, Informative) 146

Note that $400 is the price to consumers, of which I suspect there aren't many. The real value of the machine is in hotels and other hospitality businesses (they like it because it's easy to clean and maintain, and everything arrives ready chopped), and that's where they're selling. To businesses, the machine costs a cool $1200. The articles I've read suggests that there's no difference between the commercial and personal versions of the machine.

So yeah, I think they're making a huge profit out of the press.

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