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Comment Re:So, the fascist douchehammers stepped back. (Score 1) 78

Isn't it about time someone came up with a printer that isn't based around proprietary rip off cartridges!

You mean someone like Brother, or Canon? I have never bought a printer from either company that had a DRM-chipped ink tank.

I stopped buying Epson printers when they came out with chipped ink tanks. And I have never bought HP printers because their older Windows drivers were always heinous pieces of crap, and by the time they figured out that drivers shouldn't cause clumsy on-screen popup dialogs, they had added chips to their cartridges.

That said, I've never had good luck with refills or third party ink, so I only buy OEM cartridges anyway. That's the reward Brother and Canon get for making high quality products that don't try to screw me.

Comment Re:dust (Score 4, Informative) 270

Uhhhh dude? Yeah did you not see where this C64 is? Wanna guess what the main vehicle was before the wall fell in that area of the world? A little hunk of shit known as the Trabant which was a 2 stroke smoke generator.

Remember friend it was an area controlled by Soviet Russia, where soot generates YOU!

Comment Re:What exactly are they doing with it? (Score 4, Insightful) 54

It's a distributed trust network, right? Why would banks that survive on trust want that distributed?

Well there's two parts to it, one is the "chain" property where like git's commits it's not possible to edit one transaction later and have it go unnoticed. You can run independent background audits that confirm that this blockchain state corresponds to these transactions and account balances. It's a lot more difficult than adding one fraudulent transaction by itself, like that somebody deposited cash in your account when they never did. Obviously if you can add "genuine" transaction to the chain that's different, but they can be validated in the process.

The other part is inter-bank transactions where it's essential that everybody agrees on the state of affairs. I wouldn't use the "proof of work" but rather signatures of trusted parties, one party one vote. If 100 banks get an inter-bank ledger, 98 of 100 agree on the block chain all the alarms should go off in the last two banks. With signing and countersigning it's pretty hard to go back on anything as 100 banks have digitially signed that they saw your bank digitally sign that this block chain is correct. Because it's harder than you think to find one trusted master to rule them all, both domestically and internationally. Everybody wants to do their own verification which is exactly what block chains provides.

Comment Re:The problem with privitization? Or just no shit (Score 1) 457

Government does little in the way of firsts as they are bound by health and safety laws and sending people on fact-gathering missions is generally a waste of money. Technically the moon missions would come under military, even then, wouldn't they?

Technically, no they wouldn't as NASA is a civilian agency operating outside the chain of command. In every other respect, yes it was the military backing it and funding it.

Comment The only think that will fix this is to assume... (Score 1) 181

...corruption universally. If you work for the government or one of its contractors, you should be filmed at all times, and have all your texts and emails monitored. A parallel law for the private sector should kick in for executives.

Is that intrusive? Yes, that's the point. Would it work? Not perfectly, but it would knock out a lot of casual corruption and catch quite a few of the more egregious abusers, particularly in the defense industry and the three letter agencies.

Comment Re:Tonnage (Score 2) 201

They say it can transport about 100 tons. That's not much for a colonization effort. The Mayflower that transported the pilgrims to America was rated at about 180 tons. They could expect to live off the land for the most part whereas whoever takes the trip to Mars will be entirely dependent on what they bring with them. Without help from the natives it's likely that the Mayflower's people would not have done as well if they managed to survive at all. Maybe the Martians will help Musk's colonists.

Well, just like when Musk launched the Autopilot saying this is going to become our self-driving car he's exaggerating quite a bit what it'll do in the short term. It'll be an outpost, sustained by Earth resupplies and the bigger the outpost, the greater the need for resupplies. It'll be a very long time before you hit critical mass where each expansion would make it more self-reliant. It'll mostly be a proof of concept, can we expand the living quarters with on-site materials or do we need domes from earth? Can we generate enough food, water, air, heating and power and so on? The burden on Earth needs to go down, then the size of the outpost can go up.

I expect they'll keep enough emergency supplies and consumables in reserve to survive while they try things out and figure out what works and doesn't. But if it doesn't work, we have to send more supplies and less people or all supplies and no people or in worst case just abandon it. Though I don't really believe that, I mean if they just sit in a bunker and eat canned food like on the ISS it's hard to see any reason why they should be forced to leave. But they also wouldn't really be making any progress towards colonization that way, it'd be just survival. Then again, surviving Mars might in itself be the first step since we haven't actually done that yet either.

Comment Re:nice video, but the launch seems backwards (Score 4, Informative) 201

They show the spaceship being launched first, to be refueled by a drone tanker. Shouldn't the tanker be launched first? Unlike the spaceship, it can wait indefinitely in orbit if the second launch is delayed.

I think that whole segment is full of artistic liberty. I'm sure they'll have reuse and fuel boosters and "quick" turnaround, but the Formula One pit stop where the rocket lands right next to a fuel pod, it is hoisted in place and is ready for liftoff again is fantasy. I'd guessing that logistically they'd always do it backwards with a previously landed and refurbished rocket launching first with the fuel, then if successful a new rocket with people that afterwards lands and it refurbished. But I think it's fair to leave practical details like that out to convey the essence to non-nerds.

Comment Re:Mozilla is wasting money, brains, and time (Score 2) 97

I like Firefox and use it as my primary browser. It's a decent albeit imperfect bit of software. But if Mozilla really wants to make a difference they need to focus on solving actual problems instead of trying to do a second rate version of whatever Google is working on this week. They need to focus on a specific problem and do it really well. They did that for a while with browser software. Time to genuinely focus on something new.

Actually I wish they'd go back and do something old because they had the funds without needing the hype. If there was three things you'd find on any business desktop it was IE, Outlook and Office. One down, two to go. They might have to work on an AD/Exchange too in order to really succeed. I think it's nuts that in 2016 most people still use proprietary tech for simple documents and spreadsheets.

Comment Re:Human missions = funding (Score 2) 112

If that was the way the world worked, we'd have Saturn Vs to launch superheavy payloads into space right now. Or for that matter a Shuttle program. Using robots instead of people lets us be small and cost-effective instead of huge, expensive and risk-adverse and you say it like it's a bad thing. Those programs get axed, the staff reassigned and the capabilities lost because we can't even justify the operating/launch cost. To Mars with the SLS would be a one-time gig for human spaceflight, nothing more.

Also, you're wrong about the excitement. Today the landing site will be mapped out by robots in great detail in advance, you can probably do a VR tour long before the actual landing. They won't be explorers landing in the great unknown, they'll be scientists and researchers landing at an outpost. Sure there will be some excitement but it will never peak and pass quick, just read about the end of the Apollo program. And that was riding the high of the moon landing and Apollo 13, A mission to Mars will last too long and be so prepared before the humans arrive it'll never manage to hold the excitement.

Comment Re: Comment (Score 1) 315

Depends on whether they use the age reversing tech, see young Arnie in Terminator: Gensys or the young Bridges in Tron:Legacy.

These are some strange times we live in man, we got Elvis on tour with the TCB band via video, you have holograms bringing Ronnie James Dio and Tupac back from the grave, and you can have a 70 year old and his 28 year old self in the same scene interacting. Hell give it a couple more years and I really wouldn't be surprised if they put out a new movie with Marilyn Monroe or James Dean as that seems to be the direction we are headed.

Comment Re:Microsoft Update Catalog is my new hero (Score 1) 221

So you are literally arguing that command prompts are magic? Or are you arguing that you cannot read?

Because you don't HAVE to use the GUI if you do not want to, you can just run the scripts straight from the folder and simply throw away the GUI if you want as all it is doing is simply editing a script called "update" that is in the parent folder right next to the GUI. Throw away the GUI and run the script, which again you can just open in any editor and guess what? It does exactly what the GUI does, installs the updates with the conditional flags you chose. The options you choose? Again all just basic scripts with easy to read descriptors like "install DotNET" "InstallOfficeUpdates" and "MakeLogFile" and anyone who can read even the most basic script can read these quite easily as they are all laid out in classic "if this then that" script language with no attempts at any obfuscation.

So I'm sorry but now you are either just trying to sling FUD or you honestly do not understand how virii work and think computers are magical black boxes that some boogeyman can wave a wand and create a bug. Scripting is something anyone with any kind of IT knowledge or support background is not gonna have any trouble reading, the websites being called to download the updates are the Windows Update site owned by MSFT so unless MSFT gets their own update servers pwned there is no issue there, and once you have downloaded the updates no network or third party programs or even the GUI itself is required as it is simply manually installing Windows Updates from a command line.

Comment Re:How many of those... (Score 3, Insightful) 153

Does this count the huge numbers that took the free upgrade, found they didn't like it (or just wanted to lock in the upgrade) and then went back? Does this count units sold to stores but not through to end users?

This is why I don't buy the numbers put out by companies, there is just too many ways they can manipulate the data to make it look bigger than the actual figures indicate.

Comment Re:And how many (Score 3, Informative) 153

And how many are still running Win 7

Well as of last week StatCounter puts Win7 at 39.46% and Win10 at 24.33% of the desktop OS market share, of course that's not all devices running Win10. But a whole lot and after the free offer ended there's not been much migration at all. I suspect Win7 will be even harder to kill than WinXP and that wasn't easy.

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