Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive


Forgot your password?
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Submission + - Companies Finding It Harder To Conceal H1-B Abuses (

JustAnotherOldGuy writes: In America, it's common practice to make severance pay for laid-off workers contingent on signing a "nondisparagement clause" that prohibits workers from ever speaking ill of their former employers. But as more and more layoffs are precipitated by illegal practices like hiring H1B visa-holders and forcing existing workers to train them as a condition of severance bonuses, workers are growing bolder and refusing to sign gag-clauses — or breaking them and daring their former employers to sue. Marco Peña was among about 150 technology workers who were laid off in April by Abbott Laboratories, but he decided not to sign the agreement that was given to all departing employees, which included a nondisparagement clause. Mr. Peña said his choice cost him at least $10,000 in severance pay. “I just didn’t feel right about signing,” Mr. Peña said. “The clauses were pretty blanket. I felt like they were eroding my rights," he revealed in an expose by the New York Times.

Submission + - Worst Mass Shooting in U.S. History ( 17

An anonymous reader writes: From CNN:

"Fifty people were killed inside Pulse, a gay nightclub, Orlando Police Chief John Mina and other officials said Sunday morning, just hours after a shooter opened fire in the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history. At least 53 more people were injured, Mina said. Police have shot and killed the gunman, he told reporters.

The shooter is not from the Orlando area, Mina said. He has been identified as Omar Saddiqui Mateen, 29, of Fort Pierce, about 120 miles southeast of Orlando, two law enforcement officials tell CNN.
Orlando authorities said they consider the violence an act of domestic terror. The FBI is involved. While investigators are exploring all angles, they "have suggestions the individual has leanings towards (Islamic terrorism), but right now we can't say definitely," said Ron Hopper, assistant special agent in charge of the FBI's Orlando bureau."

Comment More info on the ImagNet Competition (Score 2) 115

Has the 2014 competition, including test images and validation images.

Browsing the images, and the 200 or so categories, "artichoke", "strainer", "bowl", "person", "wine bottle"... the challenge is a bit strange: A drawing of a person isn't a "person" category, but a bottle of boyle's cream soda is a "wine bottle".

And why is "artichoke" something we need to identify in photographs?

Comment add results to a blacklist (Score 1) 276

Ability to right-click (or whatever) on a listed result and mark it as "I never want to see this site in any search I run on any topic ever" (useless result) or right-click on a listed result and mark it as "The content of this result isn't relevant to my search, block this page and all others like it from this search so I can find what I'm looking for" (irrelevant result/bad context) and re-run the search.

Comment Re:Two possible solutions... (Score 1) 346

Not legal advice, but why not get your roomie to sign a piece of paper, an agreement between you and him that you have no knowledge of his Internet activities and he is soley responsible for them, and he is paying you because you are the account holder for billing purposes but in all other ways it is his responsibility for his access? Just imagine if he was looking a kiddie porn... Having that agreement in place ahead of time would really be a Good Thing.

Comment Re:Remember carbon nanotubes? (Score 2) 345

All of the structures are related. Graphene is the one atom thick sheet stuff. Nanotubes are the sheets rolled into... tubes. Buckyballs are the sheets in a ball. Each has its its purpose: Graphene is a great conductor and really strong in two dimensions, Nanotubes are also great transmitters of heat and electricity in one dimension, and buckyballs can in theory be used for medicines, abrasives, or little tiny bearings.

all of this is relatively new, but having a way to make graphene inexpensively and reliably in any lab (the whole scotch tape pencil method) allows researches all over the world to make some and study it. As for being a "fad", as TFA states, the scientists aren't promising the next big thing, but are tempering excitement with caution.

Comment Re:Wait, graphene is a semi conductor? (Score 3, Informative) 345

Graphene ribbons respond very well to changes in voltage making them very nifty (possibly) for transistors. Great flow when you want it in a controllable way. The main issue being that they don't have a very good "off" state. So you get a nice curve of voltage v. current flowing across them, except for the middle part around 0V. That's what everyone is working on.

Slashdot Top Deals

The less time planning, the more time programming.