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Comment Re:Missing a big point (Score 1) 318

Tesla will make some changes to ensure that this type of accident is avoided in the future, and push at the next update.

I'm not sure that's possible. I think the biggest part of the problem in this case is that the sensor hardware on the Tesla Model S is inadequate for self-driving. The radar doesn't have vertical resolution so it can't determine whether there's enough clear space under an obstacle, and the camera can't resolve differences between a light gray truck and a light gray sky. To fix this you need either dramatically better vision processing software (which may well require better on-board computing hardware), or better sensors -- e.g. LIDAR.

Comment Re:74 at time of crash (Score 1) 318

I'm not so sure that a simple software fix can fix it. Some key notes:

About 4:40 p.m. eastern daylight time on Saturday, May 7, 2016, a 2015 Tesla Model S, traveling eastbound on US Highway 27A (US-27A), west of Williston, Florida, struck and passed beneath a 2014 Freightliner Cascadia truck-tractor in combination with a 53-foot semitrailer. At the time of the collision, the combination vehicle was making a left turn from westbound US-27A across the two eastbound travel lanes onto NE 140th Court, a local paved road. As a result of the initial impact, the battery disengaged from the electric motors powering the car. After exiting from underneath the semitrailer, the car coasted at a shallow angle off the right side of the roadway, traveled approximately 297 feet, and then collided with a utility pole. The car broke the pole and traveled an additional 50 feet, during which it rotated counterclockwise and came to rest perpendicular to the highway in the front yard of a private residence. The 40-year-old male driver and sole occupant of the Tesla died as a result of the crash.

US-27A is a four-lane highway with a posted speed limit of 65 mph. A 75-foot-wide median separates the two eastbound lanes from the two westbound lanes. Additionally, at the uncontrolled intersection with NE 140th Court, both eastbound and westbound lanes incorporate left turn lanes, allowing for a median opening of about 132 feet. At the time of the crash, it was daylight with clear and dry weather conditions.

Eastbound. Afternoon. May. Aka, the sun was right behind him. Clear and bright outside. This is a perfect recipe for light-colored objects ahead to be overexposed, against other overexposed objects, potentially including the road and the sky. If you have a big block of RGB(255,255,255), how do you determine the boundaries? The best you can do is recognize that it's a threat and disable autopilot, while warning the driver.

A more appropriate solution, if this was indeed the case, would be a hardware fix: read the *raw* data from the camera. A potential alternative, if the frame exposure time can be adjusted, would be to read out alternating short and long exposure frames and combine them.

Comment Re:74 at time of crash (Score 1, Insightful) 318

Forgot to mention. The car instructions say AutoPilot is not to be used where there are crossroads. In the Florida instance in question there were crossroads.

"Not to be used where there are crossroads, trucks painted a light color or other vehicles of any kind."

This is Elon Musk's "You're holding it wrong!" moment.

Comment Re:It really is Google's fault (Score 1) 131

Google should have created an OS architecture that allowed for it to push its own security updates while leaving the aesthetic aspects and third party apps of the phone vendors and carriers alone (unless they were fundamental to the security problem).

If there were a clear dividing line between "aesthetic aspects" and "things fundamental to the security problem", that might be feasible. The Android One project has actually tried to draw such a line, but none of the big OEMs are happy with where Google drew it. They want lots of control.

Comment Re:This is an Android Problem (Score 2) 131

I don't see why Google can't figure it out

(Android security team member here)

It's not that Google doesn't know how to do that. It's that Google can't do that while also having a free and open source OS. Every piece that's moved out of the OS and into Play services is another piece that is no longer open. Moreover, if Google does too much of that sort of thing and removes the ability of OEMs to customize and differentiate their devices, they'll ignore Google completely, filling in the missing bits with their own code. Removing components from the OS is a last resort, not a first choice.

What makes things worse are carrier specific builds. Apple managed to do tell them to F off, Google should too.

AFAIK, Google doesn't do carrier-specific builds for Nexus devices (though I know there is some carrier-specific testing). Google can't control what other companies do. Their devices have to pass the tests to prove compatibility or they can't use the Google apps (including Play, which is the biggest carrot), but that's the full extent of the control Google has.

Comment Re:I get disks in the mail (Score 1) 184

The surprising part, though, is not just that many people think disks by mail is old fashioned, but that people think that despite the fact that Netflix makes their profit from DVDs in the mail, not from streaming.

That's not true. Netflix loses money on streaming internationally, but in its most recent quarter its profits from domestic streaming were double its profits from DVD rentals. It also had five times as many domestic streaming subscribers than DVD plan subscribers. These figures are public.

Businesses

Highest-Paid CEOs Run Worst-Performing Companies, Research Finds (independent.co.uk) 122

An anonymous reader writes from a report via The Independent: According to a study carried out by corporate research firm MSCI, CEO's that get paid the most run some of the worst-performing companies. It found that every $100 invested in companies with the highest-paid CEOs would have grown to $265 over 10 years. However, the same amount invested in the companies with the lowest-paid CEOs would have grown to $367 over 10 years. The report, titled "Are CEOs paid for performance? Evaluating the Effectiveness of Equity Incentives," looked at the salaries of 800 CEOs at 429 large and medium-sized U.S. companies between 2005 and 2014 and compared it with the total shareholder return of the companies. Senior corporate governance research at MSCI, Ric Marshall, said in a statement: "The highest paid had the worse performance by a significant margin. It just argues for the equity portion of CEO pay to be more conservative."

Comment Re:Even if you disagree with the judge . . . (Score 1) 147

The general thrust is: You can't help people commit crimes.

True, but if you do help someone commit a crime, then you should be prosecuted for conspiracy to commit a crime, not money laundering. This guy was prosecuted for money laundering and the judge said "this ain't money laundering". If they want to prosecute him for conspiracy, they may have more luck. My guess is they went with money laundering because they thought it was easier to prove or because it had heftier penalties.

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