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Comment Re:Shit post. (Score 1) 124

I'm not at all convinced that anything will change. Car companies have to be forced by the government to spend $5 on seat belts, they're always going to be looking for the absolute minimum cost to produce economy/midrange vehicles and full automation will never fit into that.

Today there is hardly such a thing as an "economy" vehicle. The reason the average new car cost has risen to $30,000 is because much like cell phones, they're packed with dozens of "standard" features we never really even asked for.

And the overall cost of a car will become irrelevant once the concept of ownership becomes obsolete. Which it will.

Comment Re:All the worlds's a stage (Score 1) 128

Um, they weren't drafted. To them it's not about theater, it's about a paycheck and a pension. And it's really no more than sorting letters at the post office. They have no trouble as long as they don't think about it.

How fucking ironic you use the post office as your example to compare the TSA against, as if the term "going postal" means you're inviting the mailman in for a cup of tea...

Comment Re:Pull the plug on TSA (Score 1) 128

TSA was created by Bush as a knee jerk reaction to 9-11. I'm surprised Obama hasn't gotten rid of it.

Anything that "creates jobs" makes no sense to get rid of, no matter how pointless or financially bloated.

However, government never seems to get smaller nor can it realize a mistake. It only perpetuates (in this case) an unnecessary bureaucracy.

It can realize it has made many of them, but in the end it comes down to my previous statement. Even a major fuck-up will be considered a success if it "creates jobs". The clusterfuck that is the TSA has certainly done that.

Let's go back to metal detectors and private security. My tube of toothpaste isn't the problem.

TSA is.

Agreed, but that would tend to make fucking sense, which seems to be an illegal act these days.

Also, let's beat this dead horse one more time; "creates jobs".

Comment Re:reduce revenue? are you kidding me?! (Score 1) 639

...so in short, no one on a farm owns a tractor and if they do its 50 years old.

Which tends to highlight the exact reason farmers would prefer to own rather than rent.

...people like Deere that want to move more new stock in a car dealership model.

You mean contradicting idiots like Deere that want to market reliable hardware that "runs like a Deere" and yet expect customers to do nothing but rent their hardware because it won't last or some shit.

Cars don't generally last anywhere near as long as farming equipment does, so enough with the car dealership bullshit being bolstered with DCMA loopholes.

Comment Re:Missing Info (Score 2) 639

Not even remotely what they are wanting. They want to be able to have access to the repair manuals, special tools, and software that is needed to work on the tractor, which currently all the manufacturers are keeping for themselves and refuse to sell to the public.

When I bought my last 4x4 SUV (FJ Cruiser) part of the deal was a full set of dealer repair manuals. Most of the dealers I went to did not want to sell them to me. The one that did, and was willing to order me a vehicle to the specs I wanted not just what ever they had on the lot, got my business. While the manuals themselves ran me $600, they have paid for themselves a couple times over since I could do most of the minor work myself. Half the battle is just knowing where all the damn screws are located to get a part off. A must have if you are going to modify and work on your own vehicle.

A few examples of what I'm talking about.

AC repair. Dealer $160 labor, parts $350. DIY $50. Cabin air filter Dealer $50, DIY $6. OEM trailer hitch install $350. DIY $120. OEM alarm. Dealer $275. DIY $0. Changed setting in ECM. Plastic body panel replacement. Dealer $500 parts and labor. DIY $100 Seatbelt warning bell. Dealer didn't want to turn it off, claimed it was impossible. DIY $0 changed setting in ECM. Fucking priceless never having to listen to that piece of shit ding again.

When you DIY that trailer hitch and something goes wrong due to the installation causing injury to others, can you held liable to a further degree because of the unauthorized/non-certified installation?

When you DIY the alarm system on your vehicle and it gets stolen, is your insurance company liable for the same amount of loss before you tampered with the ECM to support it?

A passenger in your vehicle was not reminded with an audible chime to put on their seatbelt, resulting in serious injury due to an accident. Could you be held liable to a further degree because of blatant tampering with a known safety feature?

Is your vehicle even still under warranty because you tampered with the ECM settings?

It's not hard to find valid reasons why you pay someone else. It's also not hard to understand why you do not fuck with components designed for safety no matter how annoying they may be. The ultimate question is what turns out to be less "cost" to you.

Yeah, I know. It's a shitty world of liability we live in.

Comment The future of ownership. (Score 3, Insightful) 639

"...Not everyone is on the farmers' side here; some, according to the Associated Press, are concerned that the move would reduce revenue to tractor manufacturers, potentially landing them in trouble...."

Since we're talking about John Deere here, let me point out the fact that their global revenue almost doubled in the last ten years. In short, fuck your concerns about them being "in trouble".

"...But the tractor owners disagree, annoyed that their tractors are treated differently from their cars and trucks, which can be serviced by any independent shop."

For now, cars can be serviced at any independent shop. Let me know how that changes when Tesla becomes the dominant force on the road today, or when autonomous automobile laws force people to maintain their vehicles according to specific guidelines designed to maximize revenue for manufacturers and authorized support centers.

It's not too hard to clearly see where the concept of ownership is headed in the future.

Comment And Patent Hoaders AREN'T?!?! (Score 1) 360

" Trump would be a disaster for innovation," wrote 145 technology leaders....Some of the leaders are from tech giants like Google, Facebook and Apple...

How ironic that the worlds largest tech giants are trying to label a single man as being a "disaster for innovation", when it is rather obvious that patent hoarding by tech giants will utterly destroy innovation.

Tends to be a bitch to even innovate when patent monopolies and their legal armies are poised to shut your ass down in order to exact the control they want, and morph the tech world to their wants and needs.

Comment Re:Do the people who write this software... (Score 1) 118

..have ANY sort of moral compass? Are they complete sociopaths? Using encrypted files as blackmail is bad enough, but just deleting someones personal files altogether is just sick.

I'm sorry, I must be one of those ignorant greybeards who missed that decade when malware writers were nice to their victims, and filled their comment lines with ASCII flower art.

Hell, we've seen examples of CEOs lacking any sort of moral compass. I fail to see where you think an actual criminal would have one.

Comment Re:Barn door? (Score 5, Insightful) 212

...allowed the wholesale search of business records without constitutionally valid warrants.

Remember, the failure isn't just the Legislative branch. It is also the Judicial branch, which doesn't smack these down and punish the offenders. And it's the executive branch, which seeks patently illegal powers. We have a complete breakdown in the checks and balances system, which is supposed to prevent these abuses.

Ironically, this complete breakdown was caused by the threat of terrorism driving a "necessity" for an Orwellian solution. The end result is our Rights becoming a victim of domestic terrorism, and this concept of Freedom dissolving right out from underneath American citizens who are far too self-absorbed in social media to actually give a shit.

Comment Re:Just another Reality POS program (Score 1) 62

Years back, there was an interview with Shigeru Miyamoto. It was by one of the tech mags and they were asking him what makes a great game. 3D instead of 2D? Immersive? Should the player have cinematic elements? Does the player need to be emotionally involved? Miyamoto's answer was "well, I like moving things around the screen.". That's it. That, bluntly, is why he is a genius level game designer and the interviewers were not. Every element above is just that - an element. It can help or hinder the particular game, and Miyamoto just saw them as things that could be combined to form a game. The point? Don't discount Flappy Bird. Just because it didn't take three years and a research team to develop, does not mean it wasn't talented.

I would agree with the fact that it takes a certain amount of design talent or even artistic flair to attempt to create something as mindlessly simplistic as Flappy Bird.

Ironically, it was actually so mindless that the creator himself couldn't take it anymore, pulling the game out of app stores for a period of time to help the addicts get some professional help.

Comment Re: this malware is less evil (Score 1) 118

I don't see anything indicating the data is overwritten on the disk. If the ransomware deleted the files and then zeroed out those sectors, the files would be unrecoverable. However, the article doesn't indicate that such blanking occurs. It doesn't sound like this ransomware is sophisticated enough to do that. If you can shut the system down before your files are overwritten and then mount it read only from another system, you can certainly scan the disk for deleted files and recover your data.

You do realize how long it has taken for this type of malware to go from delete-moms-dogs-pictures to corporate-network-shares-delete-your-shadow-copies, right?

In other words, prepare for next-gen-disk-zeroing ransomware variant in 3...2...

Comment Re:This is actually a good thing in the big pictur (Score 1) 118

The way ransomware works is it builds trust with the victims that they will get their stuff back if they pay. This kind of slimyness by ransomware will make people even more reluctant to pay. If people don't pay for ransomware, ransomware will be less of a problem because the people making it don't get what they want, similar to how the US govt doesn't pay ransoms to terry wrists.

As seasoned IT professionals have been trying to teach users for decades now, the ultimate answer to ransomware (or pretty much any attack) is to have backups of your damn data.

If the average "It'll never happen to me" idiot user actually did that, ransomware would have never been a viable business in the first place.

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