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Comment Re:The Average Viewer (Score 1) 434

Some don't though. I remember a conversation I had with my grandfather (who used to repair TVs) in the pub when he was in his 80s, somehow we got onto talking about the new stuff that was coming out. HD wasn't really a thing yet - and he commented it didn't seem worth getting a large TV because how visible the lines would be (and additionally, it'd be even worse for people in NTSC countries with about 100 fewer lines).

Comment Re:so is there a good theory? (Score 1) 470

It's happening anyway, every last joule of that tidal energy is already being used, it's just being used up by crashing up and down shorelines rather than turning turbines. Tidal power merely extracts some of the energy that would have otherwise been dissipated on the shoreline, so there's no net effect on the moon anyway.

Comment Re:Work done=kinetic energy (Score 1) 470

> Now connect it to a generator and extract enough power such that it doesn't accelerate any more, but doesn't slow down

This here is the impossible bit. Just because you can /momentarily/ extract 6-odd kw at the shaft, it doesn't mean you can keep doing it forever. You may find that any more power extracted than just the friction in the bearings will slow your hypothetical wheel down.

1000Nm torque doesn't say anything about the power you can continuously extract.

Comment Re:Contra-Indicated. (Score 1) 263

You don't bankrupt a company by selling its shares.

You might make its share price lower, which in some cases might make it a tasty takeover target, but the price of a company's shares on the secondary market doesn't affect in any way shape or form the running of a business. You're only selling your ownership stake in the company to some other person.

With a well run company like Shell, if you divest shares and the price of the shares go down, it will be somewhat self correcting. The dividend yield will go up - the business's viability hasn't changed, so the dividend remains the same but you can buy into that with a lower share price - making the company more attractive to people who don't have a problem with owning shares in oil companies - thus stopping the share price from falling very far.

The only way you're actually going to hurt Shell is for everyone to stop buying their product. That isn't going to happen any time soon. It might happen over the long term, oil usage vs GDP has been falling for some time now. But selling Shell shares isn't going to put them out of business since it literally doesn't affect them.

Comment Re:Farm? Hardly (Score 4, Interesting) 196

Britain is not the best comparison for Europe. First off, Britain is always a laggard when it comes to clean power - it was a laggard just in cleaning up its act with sulphur emissions with the coal plants. The UK is also not really Europe and generally doesn't subscribe to Europe's more progressive policies when it comes to energy. Expect a lot of backsliding on this once Brexit is complete and EU regulations are no longer pulling the UK kicking and screaming into the 21st century.

Comment Re:What about stop making stuff super thin? (Score 1) 289

They aren't that fragile. My Dad has my old iPhone 4, it's never been kept in a thick plastic or silicone case, and it still looks nearly as good as new despite now being 6 years old (and on its original battery!)

My iPhone 6 which replaced it, when it came out, has never been in a case. It rattles around in my pocket with everything else in there. It's now 2 years old and still looks practically brand new despite never having been in a case and having been dropped once or twice.

They aren't anywhere near as fragile as people think. They are actually pretty tough.

Comment finally, 30 bit color panels (Score 2) 108

I have confirmed that 30-Bit color is working on a 27-inch iMac. A 16-Bit greyscale ramp was used to test. Applications which support this capability are quite sparse. At the time of my testing Preview worked and Pixelmator did not. It is likely that applications need to optin to use this feature. The standard 24-Bit pipeline is indicated with Pixel Depth: 32-Bit Color (ARGB8888). New 30-Bit color pipelines will show Pixel Depth: 30-Bit Color (ARGB2101010) or Pixel Depth: CGSThirtyBitColor. I have also been able to get 30-Bit color working on my Dell U2713H via DisplayPort. Support seemed sparse and intermittent in earlier versions, but as of 10.11.3 everything works well in my experience.

http://www.astramael.com/

The apple website notes these LG panels are P3 color gamut compliant. Which is a smaller color space than Adobe RGB, but probably sufficient for 10bit per channel. While the OS has supported 10 bit since a recent update to El Capitan, there are almost no Mac applications that make use of this. Unlike on Windows, where 10 bit color support and display panels have been available for several years. And note, the latest MacBook Pro panel still doesn't support real 10 bit. And if you want to use wide color with a secondary panel, you'll need to buy a laptop with a secondary GPU.

On the PC side, it's much easier to get the right hardware and get Adobe tools to display a wide color space. Apple is still far behind on what has become absolutely necessary for photographers and filmmakers.

Comment Re:No, they didn't. (Score 4, Interesting) 1028

"Wipe out" is indeed what it would do.

Let's imagine this is a MIRV with 15 separate warheads, totaling 50 megatons, total (maybe). Let's imagine the targets are the following British cities: London, Bristol, Plymouth, Portsmouth, Birmingham, Sheffield, Liverpool, Manchester, Leeds, Newcastle, Glasgow, Edinborough, with the larger ones receiving two warheads.

Britain would basically cease to exist as a nation. So much damage would be done the economy would be non-functional. All the transport links in the country flow through those now destroyed cities, and that infrastructure would be destroyed. Every single piece of modern electronics in the country and in neighbouring countries that was not EMP hardened would no longer work, and everything (especially the transportation system) depends on all this stuff working. The prevailing south west winds would ensure that enough fallout would end up on surrounding areas adding to the casualties, and areas with nearby nuclear power stations would receive a lot of extra fallout. Just feeding the survivors with a barely functioning transportation system would be a logistical nightmare - ground transportation would be difficult thanks most of the major road and rail routes having been destroyed. Injured survivors would be left to fend for themselves - the entire capacity of the health service would be overwhelmed with the casualties of just one of the bombs. The electricity grid would be destroyed, even to the undamaged areas, it would be years before power was restored.

The survivors themselves, many of them would be suffering PTSD in the years afterwards, and virtually everyone will have lost friends and family and probably most of what they own in the attacks. What survived wouldn't be Britain, it would be a grotesque almost zombie like Britain with at best third world conditions for decades following.

Just because there are survivors and some land left untouched doesn't mean the country is effectively destroyed.

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