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Comment That's the wrong question. (Score 1) 259

You've got a lot of opportunity. I can't really tell you what a "good job" is, without knowing you. The question I would ask you, if we were sitting face to face, is "what do you like to do?" And then we would go from there.

I would probably tell you that fields like machine learning and information security are good, but competitive. I would tell you to avoid the gaming industry, unless you know someone who can get you into one of the big studios. This is more likely if you live in a city where there is a big gaming studio, like LA or Seattle.

And I would strongly urge you to look for less competitive industries like banking and insurance, where jobs are very stable, if you wanted stable. If you wanted a resume full of big names and shorter term projects with an entrepreneurial tract inline for the second half of your career, you need to get hooked up with one of the bigger staffing firms, or consulting companies, and not be afraid to travel for work. Robert Half, Yoh, Aditi, TCS, IBM, those guys.

At least your first time out, spend $300 to $700 on a good, professionally written resume, and study how it's done. Don't underestimate the power of a nice looking, well written resume. Oh, and also remember that you can still game job boards by renewing your resume every day, and using heavy keyword concentrations in the skillsets and areas you want. It works basically the same way that SEO did before the clampdown. Don't go crazy with it, but be aware.

If you want to go straight into startups, get on LinkedIn, and make friends with people in the industry, and others that work in the field. Reach out to them. Tell them who you are and what you're about. Get involved with user groups in your area, if you live in a city. Get involved with business networking groups. Be in places where you meet people, and have an opportunity to talk and shake hands... a lot.

No matter what you're doing, you need to understand that most (not all, but almost all) technical jobs are about interacting with people, first and foremost. If you're antisocial, and you don't like talking to people, or working with them, you'll do okay to a point, but there will be a limit to how far you're able to go with this. In the event that you've been told otherwise, by anyone, I feel terrible for you and what you've gotten yourself into.

So get people skills if you don't have them. Build them, quickly.

As a CS graduate, you're officially a salesman. Congratulations.

Your career will be spent selling yourself, selling your ideas, selling your solutions, and building alliances and consensus with coworkers, vendors, contractors, and management.

Get good at this, or your life will be hard.

It's also a field where ongoing education is essential. Find a place where you can get courses online. Take them, learn the topics in and out. List them on your resume as you go, and keep a current list.

That's everything I can think of, off the top of my head.

Good luck.

Programming

Is The C Programming Language Declining In Popularity? (dice.com) 285

An anonymous reader writes: Java overtook C as the most popular language in mid-2015 on the TIOBE Programming Community index. But now over the last 13 months, they show C's popularity consistently dropping more and more. C's score had hovered between 15% and 20% for over 15 years but as 2016 ended, the language's popularity is now down to 8.7%. "There is no clear way back to the top," reports the site, asking what happened to C? "It is not a language that you think of while writing programs for popular fields such as mobile apps or websites, it is not evolving that much and there is no big company promoting the language."

But the Insights blog at Dice.com counters that TIOBE "has hammered on C for quite some time. Earlier this year, it again emphasized how C is 'hardly suitable for the booming fields of web and mobile app development.' That being said, job postings on Dice (as well as rankings compiled by other organizations) suggest there's still widespread demand for C, which can be used in everything from operating systems to data-intensive applications, and serves many programmers well as an intermediate language."

i-programmer suggests this could just be an artifact of the way TIOBE calculates language popularity (by totaling search engine queries). Noting that Assembly language rose into TIOBE's top 10 this year, their editor wrote, "Perhaps it is something to do with the poor state of assembly language documentation that spurs on increasingly desperate searches for more information." Maybe C programmers are just referring to their K&R book instead of searching for solutions online?

Comment Everybody's missing it. (Score 1) 732

The real revelation here, is that the data from the leak, regardless as to the context, and the party responsible, is authentic. It's been verified by the CIA and FBI as not containing any forgeries or being altered in any way. Not one word of the Podesta or DNC emails has been altered. So, now we know that pay for play, spirit cooking, post warrant email deletions on the private server, admissions of clinton foundation donors funding isis, and more, is all true. I'm not saying that anyone would ever chase Clinton down and press charges, but they certainly could now.

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