Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!


Forgot your password?
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Quantum Researchers Achieve 10-Fold Boost In Superposition Stability (thestack.com) 73

An anonymous reader quotes The Stack: A team of Australian researchers has developed a qubit offering ten times the stability of existing technologies. The computer scientists claim that the new innovation could significantly increase the reliability of quantum computing calculations... The new technology, developed at the University of New South Wales, has been named a 'dressed' quantum bit as it combines a single atom with an electromagnetic field. This process allows the qubit to remain in a superposition state for ten times longer than has previously been achieved. The researchers argue that this extra time in superposition could boost the performance stability of quantum computing calculations... Previously fragile and short-lived, retaining a state of superposition has been one of the major barriers to the development of quantum computing. The ability to remain in two states simultaneously is the key to scaling and strengthening the technology further.
Do you ever wonder what the world will look like when everyone has their own personal quantum computer?
The Media

Journalist Cleared of Riot Charges in South Dakota (nbcnews.com) 69

Her video went viral, viewed more than 14 million times, and triggering concerns online when she was threatened with prison. But a North Dakota judge "refused to authorize riot charges against award-winning journalist Amy Goodman for her reporting on an attack against Native American-led anti-pipeline protesters." An anonymous Slashdot reader quotes NBC News: Goodman described the victory as a "great vindication of the First Amendment," although McLean County State's Attorney Ladd Erickson told The New York Times that additional charges were possible. "I believe they want to keep the investigation open and see if there is any evidence in the unedited and unpublished videos that we could better detail in an affidavit for the judge," Erickson told the newspaper.
The native Americans "were attempting to block the destruction of sacred sites, including ancestral burial grounds," according to a new article co-authored by Goodman about her experiences, which argues that "Attempts to criminalize nonviolent land and water defenders, humiliate them and arrest journalists should not pave the way for this pipeline."

John McAfee Thinks North Korea Hacked Dyn, and Iran Hacked the DNC (csoonline.com) 146

"The Dark Web is rife with speculation that North Korea is responsible for the Dyn hack" says John McAfee, according to a new article on CSO: McAfee said they certainly have the capability and if it's true...then forensic analysis will point to either Russia, China, or some group within the U.S. [And] who hacked the Democratic National Committee? McAfee -- in an email exchange and follow up phone call -- said sources within the Dark Web suggest it was Iran, and he absolutely agrees. While Russian hackers get more media attention nowadays, Iranian hackers have had their share... "The Iranians view Trump as a destabilizing force within America," said McAfee. "They would like nothing more than to have Trump as President....

"If all evidence points to the Russians, then, with 100% certainty, it is not the Russians. Anyone who is capable of carrying out a hack of such sophistication is also capable, with far less effort than that involved in the hack, of hiding their tracks or making it appear that the hack came from some other quarter..."

Bruce Schneier writes that "we don't know anything much of anything" about yesterday's massive DDOS attacks. "If I had to guess, though, I don't think it's China. I think it's more likely related to the DDoS attacks against Brian Krebs than the probing attacks against the Internet infrastructure..." Earlier this month Krebs had warned that source code had been released for the massive DDOS attacks he endured in September, "virtually guaranteeing that the Internet will soon be flooded with attacks from many new botnets powered by insecure routers, IP cameras, digital video recorders and other easily hackable devices."

Comment Re:In all honesty... (Score 1) 235

They should have let him continue. It's not like he was contributing anything except masses of data for the cool-aid drinkers to misrepresent. And discrediting himself in the process. Now those cool-aid drinkers will have something unfair to point to.

On a side note, I'll point out that he's been dumping on Hillary with impunity, but as soon as he got into what the banks consider their private business someone gave Ecuador a call.

Comment Look, here's how it works. (Score 1) 889

It's like I keep telling everyone. Jobs aren't going away... employers are.

That doesn't mean that we're looking at a future without jobs. It means we're looking at a future where the investors and the management overhead is mostly cut out of the picture. There will be groups of consultants that hire people, but these working groups will be small, and concise. Most work, at least as it relates to tech and service oriented work will be remote.

Massive corporations are going away. Nobody realizes it yet, but that's the trajectory we're on. The organizational structure doesn't make sense, and they won't be able to compete with well organized groups of consultants who can do the same jobs, for less money. These companies bleed money, and they simply won't be able to survive when the dynamic of the workforce changes, which it's already doing.

If we're lucky, we've got another eight years of "jobs" as we know them left. This is the time to invest in your future. Know your trade, build a social network. Broaden your skillset, and take some business and sales training. When the time comes, you're going to need to be able to articulate your unique value add, because you'll be competing on a global scale. But all is not lost, you can win this. There's huge upside opportunity for those that get serious now.

You can call me a communist, or a crazy man all you like. But this is where I see it going.

Comment Re:Clinton, Podesta, Putin and Trump (Score 3, Funny) 435

Respected Avatar or NPC,

We notice that you are vigorously trying to overcorrect for your simulation's liberal bias. If you are unhappy in your simulation you can submit petition KB3035583 to request being moved to another simulation with a different bias.

The Operators

Comment Re:For them theoretically hacking a private org? (Score 1) 352

Do you have any sources? Election systems shouldn't be hackable. They should be networked but not on the internet. That's really poor planning.

I only saw the bit about 32 states on yesterday's CBS Evening News. They focused on Arizona, where IIRC the state voter registration database was breached (but supposedly not downloaded or tampered with).

They said there had been something like 190,000 attacks and probes, of which 11,000 considered serious. Unfortunately I didn't get the context for that (i.e., whether it was just election infrastructure, or what the time frame was).

You're right though - neither the election infrastructure nor any other part of our national infrastructure (public and private) should be exposed to attacks via the internet.

Comment Re:Too Late (Score 5, Insightful) 394

The should have released this stuff when she was running against Bernie.

Everybody knew (and still knows) she's in bed with Wall Street. That was probably the main issue that let Bernie get to the populist/left side of her.

She changed her tune to neutralize that advantage, but no one seriously believes she's going to get tough on Wall Street.

This is more non-scandal in search of a headline. But everyone should have forseen that as soon as they saw "Wikileaks".

Slashdot Top Deals

Every young man should have a hobby: learning how to handle money is the best one. -- Jack Hurley