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Comment Retail Hell, More Proof Cats Are Better Than Dogs! (Score 1) 220

There's a reason people that own one cat go crazy and have brain damage and end up owning more of those things.

The Toxoplasma Gondii requires cats to multiply, so it alters the behavior of its host rodents in order to steer them towards a cat's digestive system.

Now, humans and cats have lived together for millenia; it makes perfect sense that the Toxoplasma Gondii might also have steered us into giving their furry brothels a comfortable place in our homes and our beds... And for the cats, they have two species directly feeding them: Mice and Men. Perfect case of symbiotic evolution.

You'll never see Lassie do anything that smart.

Now, back to the parent post about working at PetSmart:

I've seen coworkers that were normal before become irritable and irrational after getting a cat.

Are you sure that's not just caused by working retail for long enough?

And then there was me, working at Home Depot, wearing the trademark Orange Apron. We had a cat in the store; it ate the mice that lived on the birdseed in the Seasonal Department. As I walked into the lunchroom, about 30 people eating lunch, big shift change time of day...

"Hey Lawrence! I hear you found the store cat!"

"Well, I found part of the store cat..."

Comment Re:Other way? (Score 1) 220

Does mental illness lead to owning a cat, though?

Being a crack dealer seems to lead to owning a pit bull, so why not?

Given the above, I'm proud to be a cat person. We must be nuts... why else would we put up with an egotistical, narcissistic, impatient, violent, snobby creature in our homes?

Better to have such a creature in my home than in the White House.

Comment Misty Water-Colored Memories... Slashdot Oldtimers (Score 1) 86

Great printer, those old Panasonics. Fast, clean, quiet, durable. Also loved the Epson MX-80 and the Okidata ML320.

I had a DEC LA-36 teletype (nb. not a TeleType) attached to my TI-99/4A back in the day... its 7 pin printhead lacked true descenders, so the print matched the text on the TI-99/4A's screen!

By the time I got to the Amiga 1000 and 500, I had a hand-me-down HP LaserJet I. What a tank. A Canon photocopier with HP's modifications, and doubled as a great ozone generator. The printer was connected to the Amiga by a 300 or 1200 baud RS-232 link. Annoyingly, I couldn't print anything from the BBSes while I was online - the Amiga's single serial port was needed for the modem. :)

Nowadays, there's a Unix mainframe in my right front pocket. And I can wirelessly print to a Samsung color laser printer that's 10x faster and 1/4 the weight. Don't even get me started on that Chromecast thing that's smaller than a videocassette and faster than a drive to Blockbuster.

But I do miss the quality of the old stuff. The old HP LaserJet just happened to be the very first (shared with the Apple LaserWriter) of its kind. Cost-reduction was not a goal; quality was. And it showed.

I miss HP.

Nice to meet another Slashdot old-timer...

Comment Fond Memories (Score 1) 39

RIP.

I can remember playing when I was a kid. Was so addictive and fun to play that people would gather around and try to beat each person before them, get the high score. Many a weekly allowance wasted on this title... but the better you got at the game, the cheaper it became to play.

Comment Congratulations,your PC is now a governance device (Score 3, Insightful) 172

The camera "sees" the user and even knows which user it is seeing. The camera then locks the screen immediately when the user is not present.

How long before the computer "sees" the user and notifies the police that they can pick up their known dissident. I mean, really, given the kind of governance we're about to enter into, this (not to mention Alexa-like audio surveillance "features") are the last thing I'd want on any equipment in my home.

And no, I don't have anything to hide. But conversely, I also don't use the restroom in the middle of 5th Avenue. Privacy is a thing, even in a world full of morons who think it isn't.

Comment Re:Strategically important (Score 1) 20

Yes, quite carried away. Your exposition is quite naive in thinking that people think in the scope you think they do. The failure to respond has been repeated historically quite a number of times.

And I think your timing of off by 50+ years, nothing will happen until people are really starving.

Nothing will likely happen until the 0.1% are starving, by which time it will be too late to do anything. The only reason to even hold out what little hope there is, is that people like the grandparent are at least thinking about, and worrying about, these things. If enough do, then real change can happen. Like the outcry that forced the Republicans to back off (at least for now) gutting the House Ethics committee, when the masses do voice their concern, they are heard. Unfortunately we all feel too weak, and too powerless, to make much noise unless things really hit the fan (by which point it is often too late). This is not an accident, and there are very specific reasons we as citizens are constantly made to feel powerless (hint: it benefits those running the show, on whichever side of the aisle).

Comment DRM paradise (Score 1) 229

While this request has DRM implications I really don't like (lense to screen encryption) and is no doubt an MPAA wet-dream, I unfortunately have to support this, as the clear and present danger to journalists, and the potential for regimes like the Trump Administration, Putin, et. al. to distort or destroy evidence of wrongdoing, demand something like this. At least with encryption journalists can keep their data safe, and if done properly, we can detect changes to the raw video/audio data. Both of which will be critical if we don't permanently want to live in a so-called "post-truth" reality (which really means "nothing but lies, lies, and more lies" reality).

Comment Re:Yes.... (Score 2) 381

Yes but. I used to declare variables overly large as a kludge to help out when error-trapping was consuming too much time and I knew that the compiler wasn't good with overflows. So I'd do input error checking up to the point where it started to take too much time, then declare a variable larger than reasonable input would be, and then attempt to trap and reject input at a length between reasonable input values and the declared variable size. Declaring a variable just larger than the input buffer was one specific way to address attempts to force overflows through buffer overruns. Yes it was a horrible kludge and can't survive any sort of dedicated attack, but it served to deter casual probes looking for exploitable boundary condition errors.

Of course the better answer is to not use an OS and compiler that sucks so bad that the basic io buffers and basic overflows are exploitable, but sometimes you gotta use what you have.

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Today's scientific question is: What in the world is electricity? And where does it go after it leaves the toaster? -- Dave Barry, "What is Electricity?"

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