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Comment Re:Block on the phone. (Score 2) 76

I like the idea of moving as much decision making as possible to the phone, but I don't want a whitelist. That would require me to make the effort to whitelist people, plus having the prescient power of anticipating which strangers I want to hear from (e.g. whoever found my dog and called the number on her collar). I'm ok with getting a call from a stranger, as long as their "return address" isn't forged. If the return address is correct, and they are annoying, I can blacklist 'em. Allowing strangers to call me is the best default. Not perfect (it's easy to imagine some failure scenarios), but best.

Comment Re:also in the news ... (Score 1) 470

Good thing it takes longer to work someone to death if you're paying them a little bit. Slavery is for suckers.

The thing is....NONE of these "gig" jobs are there for you to make a living on...that's not their purpose.

They are there to allow you to make some money on the SIDE, when you have free cycles.

Not every single job out there is one meant to make a career and living from, when did this thinking come about?

Perhaps from the fact that everybody needs a job to make a living on? And that people who have a job that they make a living on, have no free cycles?

Comment Re:So what? (Score 1) 397

This just removes the fig leaf. .. Anyone who's serious about security wouldn't rely on the ISP being on their side-- one would already be using strong encryption etc. for all communication if one were actually concerned about security.

This really is the best way to look at things.

If people want "privacy laws" then those laws shouldn't be about what's not allowed to happen; the laws need to be about what is required to happen (the goal being to encourage common sense practices, because nobody can protect your privacy for you.). Make it so that businesses and people can't access government's network services without going through a darknet, for example. Do not allow any plaintext email communication with the government. Put into "REAL ID" that the issuing authority also has to sign the identified person's key and include the fingerprint on the ID card. Don't allow government money to be spent on computers containing any software which can't be audited and maintained. And so on.

Don't make anyone protect their privacy overall, but do make it so that they have to pay lip service to common sense in any interaction with government (and then let convenience and economy of scale take it from there; lazy people will then do the right thing). Or, just don't have privacy laws since, obviously, we don't really care. Pick one or the other.

Comment Re:So now Trump controls where we vacation (Score 1) 191

About bloody time. Anybody who "Vacations" in ISIS territory falls into one of three categories:
1. Liberal Christians about to become martyrs.
2. People who have become radicalized Islamic Jihadi going there to train for suicide missions.
3. Aid workers.

Examining their social media accounts will quickly sort them into one of these three groups, and allow us to stop #2 from traveling.

Comment Re:So? (Score 1) 116

It definitely is. Gedit has been cited already, but what pissed me off more is gnome-terminal: the double click selection behaviour cannot be configured in the GUI any more. You need a CLI command reminiscent of registry manipulations on Windows. Insanity for a terminal. The definition of a tool used by power users...

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