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Submission + - Private Cloud Is As Good As Dead, Proponents Just Don't Know It Yet (cio.com)

itwbennett writes: Analyst firm Wikibon 'believes that leading vendors are currently at or below a $100M/yr run-rate for OpenStack-related business (hardware, software, services),' writes John Furrier on LinkedIn. This means, 'the sum total of all [OpenStack] vendors has to be less than $2 billion,' says Bernard Golden, who foretells the death of private cloud in a recent article. Meanwhile, in public cloud land, Amazon Web Services posted $2.88 billion in revenue in Q2 2016, and Azure revenues, which are harder to figure because Microsoft includes services like Office 365 in its 'cloud business' numbers were about $800 million in the quarter ending June 30, writes Golden. The numbers don't tell the whole story, of course, but that's not good news either, because, as Golden puts it, 'While private cloud proponents have spent the last five years focusing on getting their IaaS offerings working, Amazon, Microsoft and Google have moved way beyond core computing services.'

Comment Re:Almost Cool (Score 1) 72

The wiki aspect is the ability for anyone to upload a (published) tree and map its tips to names in the taxonomy. Literally, anyone with a github id can contribute. However, I do concede your point - the skill to map names to tips and access to trees are not attributes your average Joe is likely to display.

Comment Re:Almost Cool (Score 1) 72

It's more complicated than that. Opentree builds a taxonomy which is a 'consensus' from taxonomies from NCBI, SILVA, Index Fungorum, WoRMS, etc. This taxonomy is then used to scaffold the assembly of a phylogeny from the set of accepted trees. These trees (478 in the current synthesis) are selected from the ~3000 studies that have been contributed to the database. There are groups (for example spiders) where the coverage by available trees is rather sparse or absent. In these cases, the synthetic tree necessarily falls back on taxonomy, but that represents a failure of coverage, not the intent of the project. I agree that the biggest benefit will be to scientists who have a relatively friendly, github backed, collection of published phylogenetic trees (thus, more like TREEBASE). The synthetic tree will help fill in the gaps where a tree is required that is not covered by any one existing phylogeny.

Submission + - Hubble Discovers 'Planetary Graveyard' (discovery.com)

astroengine writes: The Hubble Space Telescope has discovered rocky remains of planetary material ‘polluting’ the atmospheres of two white dwarfs — a sign that these stars likely have (or had) planetary systems and that asteroids are currently being shredded by extreme tidal forces. Although white dwarfs with polluted atmospheres have been observed before, this is the first time evidence of planetary systems have been discovered in stars belonging to a relatively young cluster of stars. “We have identified chemical evidence for the building blocks of rocky planets,” said Jay Farihi of the University of Cambridge in a Hubble news release. “When these stars were born, they built planets, and there’s a good chance that they currently retain some of them. The signs of rocky debris we are seeing are evidence of this — it is at least as rocky as the most primitive terrestrial bodies in our Solar System.”
Crime

Submission + - DOJ, MIT, JSTOR Seek Anonymity in Swartz Case

theodp writes: Responding to an earlier request by the estate of Aaron Swartz to disclose the names of those involved in the events leading to Aaron's suicide, counsel for MIT snippily told the Court, "The Swartz Estate was not a party to the criminal case, and therefore it is unclear how it has standing, or any legally cognizable interest, to petition for the modification of the Protective Order concerning others' documents." In motions filed on slow-news-day Good Friday (MIT's on spring break), the DOJ, MIT, and JSTOR all insisted on anonymity for those involved in the Swartz case, arguing that redacting of names was a must, citing threats posed by Anonymous and LulzSec, a badly-photoshopped postcard sent to Assistant U.S. Attorney Stephen Heymann and another sent to his Harvard Prof father, cake frosting, a gun hoax, and e-mail sent to MIT. From the DOJ filing: 'I also informed him [Swartz estate lawyer] that whatever additional public benefit might exist by disclosing certain names was, in this case, outweighed by the risk to those individuals of becoming targets of threats, harassment and abuse.' From the MIT filing: 'The publication of MIT's documents in unredacted form could lead to further, more targeted, and more dangerous threats and attacks...The death of Mr. Swartz has created a very volatile atmosphere.' From the JSTOR filing: 'The supercharged nature of the public debate about this case, including hacking incidents, gun hoaxes and threatening messages, gives JSTOR and its employees legitimate concern for their safety and privacy.'
Biotech

Submission + - A new genetic code found (bytesizebio.net)

Shipud writes: A group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Yale University and the Joint Genome Institute have isolated single cells of otherwise elusive and unculturable SR1 bacteria and sequenced their genomes. They found that SR1 deviate from the genetic code in a way previously unknown: what codes for "stop making proteins" in most organisms, is used differently in SR1, to actually continue making them. This study shows the power of a new technology, single-cell DNA sequencing, to reveal genetic information. SR1 bacteria are found in our mouths, and are suspected to cause periodontitis.

Comment Moderate dress (Score 2) 106

Although I own a couple of small (5",8") scopes, my generally preferred tool is a decent pair of binoculars. I've tried computer-based star finders without a lot of success, but nothing works quite as well as pointing the binos toward a constellation or region of sky between constellations I recognize.

Submission + - Study of Brain Cancer and Cell Phones (symptombraincancer.com)

sosis96 writes: "Brain cancer cell phones – A new study out of Denmark suggests that cell phone use may not increase your risk of some types of noncancerous brain tumors. Apparently, it makes sense that if cell phone radiation caused tumor growth in humans, that this particular tumor might be found more often in people using cell phones."
Science

Submission + - New Virus Jumps From Monkeys to Lab Worker (sciencemag.org) 1

sciencehabit writes: It started with a single monkey coming down with pneumonia at the California National Primate Research Center in Davis. Within weeks, 19 monkeys were dead and three humans were sick. Now, a new report confirms that the Davis outbreak was the first known case of an adenovirus jumping from monkeys to humans. The upside: the virus may one day be harnessed as a tool for gene therapy.
Science

Submission + - Lizards beat birds in intelligence test (mongabay.com) 1

rhettb writes: Reptiles have long been thought to be dim-witted, but a new study in Biology Letters finds that the Puerto Rican anole, a type of lizard, can match birds in intelligence. Using cognitive tests that have been previously used on birds, researchers with Duke University found that the lizards were capable of solving a problem they've never encountered before, remembering the solution in future trials, and even changing techniques when presented with new challenges. In fact, the tiny anoles solved the test with fewer tries than birds.
Science

Nature Publisher Launches PLoS ONE Competitor 62

linhares writes "Nature's Publishing Group is launching a new journal, Scientific Reports, announced earlier this month. The press release makes it clear that it is molded after PLoS ONE: 'Scientific Reports will publish original research papers of interest to specialists within a given field in the natural sciences. It will not set a threshold of perceived importance for the papers that it publishes; rather, Scientific Reports will publish all papers that are judged to be technically valid and original. To enable the community to evaluate the importance of papers post-peer review, the Scientific Reports website will include most-downloaded, most-emailed, and most-blogged lists. All research papers will benefit from rapid peer review and publication, and will be deposited in PubMed Central.' Perhaps readers may find it ironic that PLoS ONE, first dismissed by Nature as an 'online database' 'relying on bulk, cheap publishing of lower quality papers to subsidize its handful of high-quality flagship journals' seems to be setting the standards for 'a new era in publishing.'"

Submission + - Wakefield autism study "an elaborate hoax" (cnn.com)

schmidt349 writes: According to the British Medical Journal, the controversial and later retracted study on the relationship between vaccines and autism was an academic forgery by its author, Dr. Andrew Wakefield. Evidently Dr. Wakefield went much further than simply misrepresenting or misreporting his data; he deliberately falsified the records of all 12 patients in his study. His motives are unclear, but the $674,000 BMJ alleges Wakefield received from attorneys in the UK MMR vaccine case may have played a role.
Image

Australian Politician Caught Viewing Porn 150

destinyland writes "An Australian Parliament member has resigned after admitting he'd used government computers to access porn and gambling sites. McLeay 'gave an uncomfortable press conference outside Parliament House,' notes one technology site, 'during which he admitted he had acted in a standard not expected of cabinet ministers.' Paul McLeay was also the Minister for Mineral and Forest Resources as well as the Minister for Ports and Waterways. In resigning, he apologized to his constituents and parliamentary colleagues, as well as to his wife and family."
Space

Submission + - Scientist: 'Galaxy is Rich in Earth-Like Planets' (discovery.com)

astroengine writes: "In a recent presentation, Kepler co-investigator Dimitar Sasselov unexpectedly announced news that the Kepler Space Telescope has discovered dozens of candidate Earth-like exoplanets. Not waiting for the official NASA press release to announce the discovery, Sasselov went into some detail at the TEDGlobal talk in Oxford, UK, earlier this month. This surprise announcement comes hot on the heels of controversy that erupted last month when the Kepler team said they were withholding data on 400 exoplanet candidates until February 2011. In light of this, Sasselov's unofficial announcement has already caused a stir. Keith Cowing, of NASAWatch.com, has commented on this surprise turn of events saying it is really annoying "that the Kepler folks were complaining about releasing information since they wanted more time to analyze it before making any announcements. And then the project's Co-I goes off and spills the beans before an exclusive audience — offshore." Although Sasselov could have handled the announcement better (and waited until NASA made the official announcement), this has the potential to be one of the biggest astronomical discoveries of our time — so long as these Earth-like "candidates" are confirmed by further study."

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