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Comment Re:Troglodytes (Score 4, Insightful) 183

All of them, and make no mistake Hillary would have been just as bad.

No, I'm pretty sure she wouldn't have been. I think it's reasonable to assume she would have continued the same kind of policies as Obama. And it was Obama's FCC that started to take Network Neutrality seriously to begin with.

There is no justification for claiming a "Both sides" position here, just as there isn't with 90% of what Trump is doing.

Comment Re:It's pretty simple (Score 1) 260

I happen to like cold water, at least in the summertime.

However, I really don't like icemakers in freezers. 1) They take up a lot of space, and 2) they use tap water, which is nasty. There doesn't seem to be a way to easily plumb them to use the RO water I buy, so the icemaker in my freezer just sits unused, wasting space. And no, those crappy filters they put in fridges these days are not a proper substitute. 1) They're not reverse osmosis, they're just shitty charcoal filters, and 2) they're horribly expensive to replace.

They should make icemakers easily removable. I'm perfectly capable of making ice myself with trays, which lets me use the water I prefer and not the nasty tap crap.

Comment Re: God no (Score 2) 201

Um, I don't know about you, but while I do admittedly charge my phone on the bedside table, the phone is sitting usually face-up. That means the main camera is pointed at the table surface directly below it so it's useless, and the front-view camera is pointed at the ceiling. The only thing that front-view camera is ever going to see in that position is the belly of one of my cats when they decide to walk over it. (Sometimes the phone is face-down, but this isn't really any different, except that hackers will now have a higher-resolution view of my cat's underside.) The mic is definitely an issue though.

The devices that come to mind immediately as a real danger in this way are these new "smart TVs", since on these any camera is pointing directly at the users in their normal TV-viewing positions. If the TV is in a bedroom, that means it's probably pointed at the bed and has an excellent view of whatever activity happens there. And why a TV could possibly need a camera and microphone, I have no idea. If we ever get to the point where we're Skyping people over TV screens, I can see the use, but we've had Skype-like technology for ages now and it's only rarely used for video chat it seems, and never on a TV that I've ever seen or heard of.

Comment Re: Correcting myself (Score 2) 691

I am pretty sure that "we don't want shopping malls to fall on our heads" count as a strong government and public interest.

Yes, I agree, but we're not talking about people misrepresenting their qualifications designing buildings, we're talking about people saying they're qualified to discuss timings for amber lights.

Restricting phrases like "I am an engineer" in the context of someone making final technical decisions concerning building design arguably makes sense, but it's no longer "narrow conditions" when you restrict such a vague, ambiguous, phrase under all circumstances.

I say arguably because if the conversation is something like:

Isaac: I say old bean, you're putting the wrong tensile cable on that suspension bridge of yours. Here, use this rope, should be strong enough
Isambard: Who the fuck are you? What is this crap?
Isaac: You can trust me. I'm an engineer!
Isambard: Oh OK. Hold a moment. There. Oh fuck, the bridge collapsed! I thought you said you're an engineer!
Isaac: I am. An IEEE certified software engineer! I know PHP! Whoopwhoop!

...then that law is obviously a waste of time anyway.

Comment Re:Life's unfair (Score 1) 267

There doesn't need to be any unfairness here, FWIW. Well, OK, maybe if you want everyone to be part of the exact same MMORPG, but if that's not an issue (simple arena matches), why not have servers... all across the world? Including Hawaii? Each player just connects to the lowest latency server available to them to play with others connected to that server?

Doesn't that pretty much fix the problem?

Comment Re:Coordination, not more text (Score 2) 182

Let's see the same story, as published by the Squiggleslash Gazette:

Today Jimmy Wales, known for eating children, announced a new web site whose job will be collecting articles critical of the Trump administration, identifying journalists who are critics of the regime, so that Wales can go to their homes and murder them one by one.

There. That should satisfy for wish for multiple viewpoints. Questions for you:

1. Is it remotely accurate?
2. Is it more true than the summary or the article linked to?
3. Is the truth "somewhere in the middle": the original article says nothing about Wales murdering anyone, so is just a little bit of a child murderer, and is he maybe going to go to Journalists homes and just slightly murder them?
4. Is the viewpoint of the Squiggleslash Gazette worth even a split second of your time?
5. When you read the version of the story, as reported by the Squiggleslash Gazette, were you more informed, or did it make you dumber?

Compare two articles reporting on global warming. One quotes scientists, and accurately reports that the consensus within the scientific community is that smoking causes lung cancer The other fails to report that consensus, and includes only interviews with two denialists, both of whom superficially have qualifications related to health (maybe a practicing family doctor, and the director of a think tank's healthcare policy division) but neither of whom reflect the views of the majority of scientists studying in the area, and who have been found, repeatedly, to lie or misrepresent evidence. The second article presents the views of the denialists as either mainstream within medical science, or normal within science as if there's a legitimate dispute.

Is the truth "somewhere in the middle" for those two articles? Does it help you reach an informed decision to include exposure to information known to be false, without being told it's false? Are you helped if you're essentially lied to?

Comment Re:I hate them all (Score 1) 205

T-Mobile neglected to mention the "Regulatory Compliance Fees" that added $15/mo to my bill (and made them look like taxes when they're not, and no, they're not the fees for giving poor folks phone access, those have a separate line item)

That's pretty much true of all cellular companies, I've never come across one until recently that doesn't outright lie about their prices, omitting stuff like the universal service fee that's actually a cost of doing business. They lobby quite extensively to the FCC to get the FCC to agree they should be able to lie about their prices in their ads by omitting various costs-of-doing-business and adding them to bills as mandatory add-ons.

The one carrier that doesn't? Well... actually it's T-Mobile. No, not accusing you of lying, you were right up until a few months ago, it's just they've finally started to be honest about it with their T-Mobile One plan, where the prices quoted are all-inclusive.

Comment Re:Wow. (Score 1) 197

Yes Sir, that's another one of our great hits! Between you me and the fence post, we're also looking into commissioning a pilot for a new show called NCIS:Cyber, featuring the Naval Criminal Intelligence agencies that protect our brave Marines from hackers.

Also, I don't know if you like to laugh (who doesn't?) but we're looking for some top notch comedy writers for our humorous look at the "science" world, The Big Bang Theory. If you think you have what it takes, and are familiar with the kinds of shows nerds watch, like The Star Trek, and Firebug, send us your resume and some samples of your work, and maybe you can join our writing team!

- LM

Comment Re:Still a dream (Score 1) 148

It's almost certainly a hell of a lot easier to build a self-driving flying car than it is to build a self driving regular car. Regular cars have to follow roads, watch for people in unexpected places, adapt to road works, etc. Flying cars just need a rough direction to go in, and the ability to detect obstacles, with three dimensions to move around in to dodge them.

If that weren't the case, and we weren't able to create a self driving technology, I'd still question the logic that it's somehow more difficult to manually control something like this than it is a regular car. Why? What makes it harder?

Comment Re:Wow. (Score 1) 197

Hi, sorry to butt in but I'm Leslie Moonves, the President of CBS. After reading this, I'm convinced you're the right person to become the new showrunner of our hit show "<\Scorpion". You obviously know the cyber, which makes you more than qualified. Please email me as soon as possible.

PS: You guys like being paid in "Bitcons", right?

Comment Re:Cox has low customer satisfaction? (Score 1) 97

Yeah, I know why they're hated as a cable TV company, but the ISP side of Comcast has always been pretty decent in my experience, and I don't know anyone who has anything bad to say about that side of them. Sure, the data caps is an ongoing concern, but they haven't implemented anything evil on that side, beyond introducing the concept to begin with.

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