Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment Re:Missing the whole point (Score 4, Insightful) 199

I emphatically agree!

I've been trying to explain to people that the reason the ISPs want control is so they can monetize every freakin' thing that has to do with the internet.

If net neutrality is lost, the ISPs will find a way to make us pay for anything. And you can bet the ISPs will give priority to advertisers. Our stuff will sink to the bottom the list.

Comment Re:Government is not the answer. (Score 4, Insightful) 66

So let corporations be in control? I can't agree with that.

Corporations have shown time and again they have NO interest in supplying good service at a reasonable cost to their customers. (Comcast and TW) They want to maximize profit. They will find every way possible to achieve that goal. History proves this. The recent recession is a great example of that behavior. Not to mention Enron and a lot more.

Currently the ISPs have monopoly power. That's why I'm paying $85/mo for 20Mbps/2Mbps service. And it keeps going up because there is any competition.

Comment Re:Skeptical or terrified? (Score 1) 115

@Shanen: I wholeheartedly agree. GE exists only because of inertia. But I think Immelt's management style has changed "the General" a little bit.

I've also been exposed to GE and their management philosophy. Welch was/is clueless. His "management style" is crude at best. Especially his idea that a manager can be effective anywhere in the organization. (IOW once you know how to manage, you can manage anything.) When Welch was running his massive PR campaign prior to his retirement from GE, he made a big deal about his basic management principals like he was some kind of management guru. The blowback he got from several business people via the WSJ was immediate and critical. Especially his idea that every year you fire the bottom 10% of performers in every department. Those critics exposed all kinds of problems in Welch's ideas. Suddenly Welch was adding all sorts of "qualifications" and "clarifications" to defend and explain his principals.

Welch was lucky he came on the scene when he did. GE had just turned itself into a bank with their finance service. That service became the primary revenue generator for the company. So Welch looked good.

Speaking of which, here's a great example of that "manage anywhere/anything" idea. A guy whose claim to fame as a manager was installing a GPS on every locomotive was transferred to become director of marketing for one of the medical device operations. Seriously. Like there is no difference between an MRI machine and a locomotive. To top it off, this guy was arrogant and crude. He alienated so many customers it was like a dark comedy. While at a big sales show, he shouted after one customer after alienating them that they would be back because "we are GE." Classy. Real classy. This guy never should have been a manager in the first place.

I am still in contact with previous coworkers so I hear about what is going on inside at least one of the GE divisions on a regular basis.

Shanen has it right.

Comment Re:If this is the new /. (Score 2) 227

I think you're right, jmd.

I'm hoping this is an aberration of sorts or a reflection of the angry political dialogue that has been going on for sometime now. Nobody can be objective anymore. They're caught up in the "somebody is wrong on the internet" thing and just can't let it go until they call that "somebody" out.

Let's get back to tech, science, etc. You know "News for Nerds."

Anyway...

You could say I've lost my belief in our politicians.
They all seem like game show hosts to me.

Sting -- If I ever lose my faith in you from the album Ten Summoner's Tales

Comment Re:In Soviet America (Score 1) 166

You are absolutely correct, Jason unlike "tripleevenfall" who clearly has some kind of political agenda with re to that party on "the other side of the aisle" thing.

I recommend "tripleevenfall" review the origins of the Patriot Act. First of all, it was signed into law by a Republican Admin, but you'll see that everybody (ie, both political parties) were involved by introducing additional provisions, etc.

Comment They'll keep trying (Score 3, Insightful) 165

The broadband companies are going to keep trying until they get the answer they want. Then once they do, there will be no going back.

Personally I feel it's just a matter of time before they monetize everything on the internet.

This isn't a great comparison, but I remember cable TV was promoted as "commercial free TV." ie, You could watch TV without commercials.

Yeah... well... that worked out great.

Slashdot Top Deals

Nothing is impossible for the man who doesn't have to do it himself. -- A.H. Weiler

Working...