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Comment Meanwhile choline... (Score 1) 73

"[Volunteers] given an oral choline supplement for 2 months have a more than tenfold increase in trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), a metabolite derived from the gut microbiota that has previously been linked to the development of cardiovascular disease.

The increase in plasma TMAO levels is also associated with a corresponding increase in platelet aggregation."

"aspirin attenuated the rise in TMAO levels as well as reduced platelet hyperresponsiveness"

Comment Re:It's true (Score 2) 255

Pixar was unique in Silicon Valley companies in that we had deadlines that could not move. The film had to be in theaters before Christmas, etc. I'd see employees families come to Pixar to have dinner with them. I took the technical director training but decided to stay in studio tools, first because Pixar needed better software more than they needed another TD, and second because of the crazy hours.

Comment Carrier comparison (Score 2) 205

Many who comment here will have a reason that they chose one carrier over one other carrier. They may have switched carriers. I always found that the latest carrier plan was better than the competition, and that it would go back and forth or be too confusing to come up with one clear answer. I actually have iPhones and aPhones on 5 carriers. I also travel the world quite a bit. Domestically, all the carriers are good for most unless you live in an area not covered by some. I remember times when Verizon was faster but now it seems that AT&T is faster for me, most of the time. I remember when you could buy international data from Verizon that covered 200 countries, while the AT&T list was only about 50 countries. That affected me in places like Russia and South Africa, back then. T-Mobile has incredible data plans for here and away but they don't seem as fast as claimed unless I'm in the store. Sprint has gone far out of their way to help me with issues, including a stolen phone number. Right now I believe that the best carrier I have, for my own needs, is Google Project Fi because the plan works in over 100 countries. You can even order a free data-only SIM for free, without even a shipping charge, to use it on iPads and the like. I would never say that anyone's choice of plan is bad in any way though.

Comment BASIC (Score 1) 628

BASIC, back in the day. I started teaching myself at 13, on a TI 99/4A. The school I was attending at the time had barely heard about computers, much less come up with a way to try to teach someone that young about them. I was actually starting to dabble in assembly language on that machine, and managed to get a sprite to move in response to me moving a joystick around. The school may have been woefully uninformed, but the public library was a pretty good resource.

A fortunate move to upstate New York put me on a track to pick up some classes on BASIC and Pascal at the high school and Watfiv and assembly language at a local university that had a high school summer program. My senior project in high school was a graphing program that generated several kinds of graphs using Apple Pascal and the turtle graphics package that came with it. The system could barely handle it, but it was pretty spiffy. I wrote my own keyboard input routines that would allow me to set up fields of a specific size that would only allow certain characters to be typed into them.

College was more Basic, which I was entirely fucking sick of by then, and some scripting languages. I got my intro to REXX there, which was much nicer than Basic. I switched schools into a more CS-oriented program and picked up C, Ada and COBOL. By then I was starting to hear about this newfangled C++, which really sucked back in the early '90's, let me tell you. They didn't even have a STL yet. They started talking about adding templates to the language a few years later.

By then I knew my way around C pretty well, but mostly had to work on the shitty proprietary languages of the 90's. I got into some work that involved actual C programming in the mid 90's, and had a pretty solid decade of C programming. Since 2005 it's been a pretty steady mix of Java and C++, along with a bit of maintenance on some really badly-designed projects in Perl, Ruby and TCL. I'm currently doing a mix of C++ for hardware-level access to some specialty hardware I'm working on, and Java to provide some web services associated with that hardware. I might get into some Javascript to put it all together, but I'm going to try to leave that to the guys who are more comfortable with Javascript than I am.

I don't see much new coming along the road. .net, go and rust are all sufficiently close to Java or C++ that they really don't interest me. Maybe if someone offers some large briefcases full of cash to work with them. I'd be more interested in doing some hand-optimized assembly language and perhaps some GPU programming, but that would probably take another decade to get good at.

Comment Re:Steve Case is high. (Score 1) 35

And then his three examples are Sweetgreen, Framebridge, and OrderUp, which are all within one hour driving distance of each other in the DC/Baltimore metroplex.

DC has long been a tech startup area (AOL, UUNET, DIGEX, Ciena, Living Social, etc.), and I know several people who got VC funding for their startups there. New Enterprise Associates (NEA) has been very active in DC, for example.

However I think that the LEVEL and STUPIDITY of VC funding in DC is very different than the SF Bay Area - less money, and less blatantly stupid start-ups get funded in DC.

Comment Re: The problem with your explanation (Score 1) 307

If you look in the FEMA site, they say that they provide gramts to perform repairs not covered by insurance. And no, they don't do a needs test. Now, the typical rich person does not let their insurance lapse just so that they can get a FEMA grant. Because such a grant is no sure thing. They also point out that SBA loans are the main source of assistance following a disaster. You get a break on interest, but you have to pay them back.

Comment The actual data (Score 1) 223

"We estimated the 10-year risk of both incident stroke and dementia beginning from the 7th examination cycle [of the Framingham Heart Study] (1998â"2001)."

It should be noted that during the study saccharin, acesulfame-K (Sunett/Sweet One), and aspartame (NutraSweet) were FDA approved, whereas sucralose (Splenda) was approved in 1999, neotame in 2002, and stevia in 2008. So who knows, maybe those sweeteners are not linked to stroke & dementia.

"When comparing daily cumulative intake to 0 per week (reference), the hazard ratios were 2.96 (95% confidence interval, 1.26â"6.97) for ischemic stroke and 2.89 (95% confidence interval, 1.18â"7.07) for Alzheimerâ(TM)s disease. Sugar-sweetened beverages were not associated with stroke or dementia."

That is some serious risk increase!

Comment Best use for LinkedIn (Score 1) 71

I like LinkedIn, especially because it is a great way to create ad-hoc industry forums for sharing news on developing niche technologies.

But its main use for me is allowing me to figure out which company the salespeople I know are working at this week. Before I email a salesperson who I talked with six months ago, I check their LinkedIn to see if they still work at that company.

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