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Comment Re:Only a fraction of US munitions... (Score 1) 197

We bomb brown people because we can get away with it. That's more opportunist than racist, but it's still racist.

As soon as "white" people start doing the same crap, it happens to them too. I'm guessing you're wishing away that pesky little Balkan conflict a few years back, where we bombed white people for, among other things, slaughtering olive people.

Pretending that it's skin color that makes ISIS a fair target for air strikes is the worst sort of craven intellectual laziness.

Comment Re:So what. (Score 1) 282

It's clearly a generational thing. Many older individuals can't seem to understand that dvds are inconvenient.

It's more likely that the older individuals have already lived through the death of a service and don't want to experience that particular inconvenience again.

Do you remember when DIVX went belly up?

LK

Comment No, he wasn't (Score 2) 719

Assanage's offer was always empty, given that the US isn't after him, at least not publicly. Now he contends that the US wants to get him in secret, though he's presented no evidence of this and of course one would have to question if they'd agree to a public deal for something secret.

Assanage is wanted by Sweden and the UK. Sweden for a sexual assault case, and the UK for skipping bail in that case. The US has not filed any charges against him, though I'm quite sure they don't like him. If he left the embassy he would be arrested by the UK and shipped off to Sweden. Or they might not send him off, since he's broken UK law by skipping bail and try him there for that crime, then ship him off once she's served his sentence.

So this was always a stunt.

Comment Re:So what. (Score 1) 282

I'm wondering why they don't do the same with blurays.

It seems like many (most?) Blu-Rays come bundled with a digital copy from Ultraviolet or somesuch. I don't really know what that is, never having looked into how it works, but it may be that Amazon doesn't bother because the studios are doing it themselves.

Comment Re:Only a fraction of US munitions... (Score 2, Funny) 197

Our Nobel Peace Prize President dropped 26,000 bombs (real bombs, not little hand grenades)

Probably a lot more than that. You're not understanding the usefulness of air strikes on this sort of combatant.

on various brown people

Right, right. It's because of their skin pigment! For reference, resorting to lazy race baiting doesn't really win arguments (see the most recent election results as an example)

(even though we are not at war).

Yes, I can see you're having some trouble grasping current events. Please don't do anything dangerous to other people in the future. Like, voting.

Comment Re:Top priority? Always? (Score 1) 144

If your companies top priority is to keep data secure, they how/why did you get hacked. They always say that, but clearly that is not the Top Priority

I see you're doing your part by not using dangerous apostrophes where they are needed!

Implicit in any company's statement that security is their top priority is the large bundle of compromises that don't go away whether or not that is your top priority. They could make the data perfectly secure by disconnecting the servers and putting them in a bank vault. They could make sure the data can't be breached by simply destroying all of it. See?

Security can be your Top Priority, but it has to be done in the context of things like still making it available to users across the internet. Doing it while not going bankrupt. Making the service competitively priced so that it can actually be afforded and put to work.

They could have said that the system could only be used on equipment they ship to their clients, connected to the back end through a hardware-based dedicated VPN with biometrics, dongles, and constant nagging by three-factor comms surrounding every time someone hits the enter key ... and of course nobody could or would want to use the system or pay the monthly fee needed to keep something like that alive.

They may very well put security at a higher priority than chipping away at a long list of UX updates, performance under load, documentation, multi-language support, and a thousand other things. Doesn't mean that doing so means they'll be perfect in their security results. Ever run a business like that? No? Give it a whirl. Make security your top priority, and then start paying attention to what that decision means in real life - including in your ability to get and retain customers during that balancing act.

Comment Re:Huge numbers! (Score 1) 272

What? Tens of millions of people routinely bitch, in public with their names attached, about every possible person, agency, posture, act, policy and purpose of government across the spectrum from the local PTA to city, county, state, federal, and international governance. There is nothing "brave" about parroting a lazy meme about freeing Snowden from prosecution for some very cut and dry real crimes. Your sense of drama is wildly disconnected from reality. Show me a single person, ever, who has been put into any sort of legal jeopardy for saying out loud, "Snowden should be pardoned." A single example. Specifically.

Comment Re:You don't know what a free market is, do you? (Score 1) 372

You can't get patents or copyrights on a recipe.

I think the issues are a little more complex than this. No copyrights on a recipe: sort of right. You cannot copyright a simple list of ingredients or basic instructions explaining how to put them together. Cookbooks, on the other hand, which include cute or clever language, photos of meals and so on are certainly copyrightable.

I believe you may be able to get a patent on a recipe. The reason companies don't bother -- why Coca-Cola has never patented its secret formula, for example -- is because it would be pointless, because patents are public. As soon as Coca-Cola patented its formula, everybody in the world would know exactly how it was made, and it would be trivial to create taste-alike products. Instead, Coca-Cola maintains its formula as a trade secret and does not rely on government protections such as patents.

Comment Re:Now this is just getting stupid (Score 1) 563

I get various types of enjoyment out of my vinyl collection. Yes, the sound is pretty good -- in some cases better than the CD (because the CD was mastered for the "noise wars" and had to be remastered for vinyl). But there's also the enjoyment of full-sized art, lyric sheets you can read, occasional bonus artwork, colored vinyl is pretty common, have a couple of "three-sided" records where the fourth side has been etched with artwork, I have a couple of records with holograms on them ... hell, one record I own even features a playable board game in the gatefold. Choosing vinyl is a fun way to interact with your music beyond just listening to it. It's a different experience even than buying CDs.

Comment Re:Nice Job HTC (Score 1) 205

Sorry, dude, but these people know where their bread is buttered and while I don't see a ton of value in removing a headphone jack they're not going swayed by a handful of neckbeards threatening to buy whatever. Every time tech takes a jump there is a cry from a couple dozen people like you about not wanting the new tech for any number of reasons (many better than what you're presenting here) but in a couple years even you will be on the bandwagon.

I live in two different worlds. I am a geek, so I do tech stuff but I'm also a gun guy.

Do you remember when Smith and Wesson signed a deal with the Clinton DOJ to get preferential treatment on government contracts? The backlash was so swift and severe, the owners had to sell the company to stave off bankruptcy and the new owners had no intention of honoring the deal. To stop this trend, there has to be this kind of a revolt among HTC's customers.

This one feature might not be a bridge too far for most buyers but I suspect that there's some cell phone maker out there cheering because they know that their sales are going to get a bump from the people who won't ride this wave.

But, I'm not opposed to tilting at windmills. I'm still continuing my 20+ year one man boycott of Nintendo. I stopped using Opera when they removed the menu bar and I won't use Chrome for the same reason.

LK

Comment It is a problem I've talked about for a long time (Score 0) 130

And one that often gets me downvoted since Mac users don't like to hear it: Apple is a fashion company. That's why they've been able to do what they do. In fashion, a higher price can be a GOOD thing not a bad thing, whereas consumer electronics are one of the most notoriously price sensitive markets out there.

However the downside is as you say: What is fashionable changes and it is really hard to stay on top of it forever.

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