Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment Statistics exagerrated? (Score 1) 272

I'm not really going to argue statistics, but I have Windows 10 installed on 3 different laptops ... and all of them dual-boot Xubuntu. So that's 3 less that they can really count on. Then again, dual-boot is not for everyone, even amongst my fellow LUG members.
One laptop (ultrabook) in particular has a dual core Celeron chip running at 1.1ghz, and only 2GB of RAM. I'm sure you can guess how well it runs Windows 10. Even when it had only Windows 8.1, it was a little slow. Running Xubuntu it behaves like a normal computer, boots in about 20 seconds, updates when they're available in a matter of seconds like any other of my laptops and performs quite well, even when running a couple of programs simultaneously.
I'm typing this on my main laptop, a Core i3 chip + 8GB laptop for which I had no recovery discs when it's HD died : I bought a 1TB spinning platter HD, and installed Xubuntu without a qualm. If I find myself buying a new PC with Windows 10 installed ... I might dual-boot ... or I might pull the HD out, stick another in and just run Linux!

Comment I'm not an IT Pro ... but: NO! don't upgrade (Score 1) 982

I have 3 laptops with Windows 10 on them: 1 works fine, 1 works ... slowly, 1 has just died.
All three are dual-boot with either Xubuntu or Lubuntu.

The 1 working laptop is a HP Compaq CQ45 with 6GB RAM and a fast Quad core Celeron chip. I use it to demo Windows 10 which I "voluntarily teach" at the City Library. Whether I boot it to Windows 10, or Lubuntu 14.04.4 LTS it works well.

The 1 that works slowly is a ASUS Ultrabook with a slow Celeron chip (1.1 or 1.2 ghz) and 2GB RAM. It's as slow as it sounds. When I boot it to Xubuntu 14.04.4 LTS however, it works much better.

The 1 that has just died on it's Windows 10 install is a ASUS Ultrabook FS502C with a Pentium Dual Core 2117U and 4GB RAM. Xubuntu 14.04.4 LTS is running fine on this one too: that's how I identified the chip, with "System Profiler and Benchmark". I have to confess the Windows 10 install is probably a hodge-podge mess, as I had used it for the preview editions, and it took booting with a Win10 1511 DVD to restore it last time it died.

As a volunteer at the City Library, I've encountered many people having problems because their laptop upgraded without them having particularly intended to.
Even experienced people have been caught out, and I've taken great delight in sharing GWX Control Panel with those who are horrified by the possibility it will happen "behind their back". I've also made careful note of the mention of Never10 in discussions here :-)

My advice to people is, if you like Windows 7 or 8.1, don't upgrade to 10. The earlier versions will be supported for what will probably by the life of the average laptop (another 4 years or so), and if they then buy a new one, they get Windows 10 by default ... hopefully a mature product by then. I have one laptop that has Windows 7 and the afore-mentioned Xubuntu 14.04.4 LTS ... and I'm guarding Windows 7 like my life depends on it. I have a desktop PC with Windows 8.1: ditto.

Microsoft might be pushing Windows 10 because it will make life easier for them, but the way they're doing it is not making life easier for customers.
I acknowledge that ongoing development and security issues change things, which is why I accept the eventual upgrading of my Linux installations from one LTS version to the next, but if I've paid good money for an operating system, I expect to keep it as long as I want to!

Comment Caught Texting while Driving? (Score 1) 293

I've thought for many years that police should be able to confiscate the phone from a texting driver, stick it under one of the cars wheels, and then wave them on their way. This alone ensures that, at least until they can get to a shop and buy a new phone, the nut holding the wheel can concentrate on driving safely.

Comment Re:Best update ever (Score 1) 181

You don't even need to turn Secure Boot off: I have a laptop originally with Windows 7 installed, dual-booting with Lubuntu 14.04, and then did the upgrade to Windows 10 from within Windows 7. No problem, still boots Grub first, then if I select "Windows 7" on the Grub menu, it boots Windows 10.

I also installed Xubuntu on another laptop, which had been running the Windows 10 Technical Preview. All you have to do is use a x86_64 distro, and start it from the update/recovery setup where you can tell it to run a USB or CD ... installed no problem at all, since AFAIK Ubuntu variants are properly "signed".

Comment Re:Free alternatives? (Score 1) 90

I've been using MalwareBytes (as suggested above) then installing Comodo Internet Security http://comodo.com/ (free for personal use) if needed, and finally CCleaner from Piriform http://piriform.com/ to rescue peoples PCs after disaster has struck.
I'm thinking of making it a standard "pack" of software for anyone who asks at the Library where I volunteer.

Comment I'm not sure there will be a "Linus Torvalds rant" (Score 1) 362

Like you I've installed Windows 10 technical preview on a laptop ... and then gone on to install Xubuntu alongside it.
It worked, with the added bonus that Win 10 actually fixed the borked Win 8 OEM installation in the first place.
I didn't know what the problem was with Win 8, I spent a little time trying to fix it, then went and bought my wife another cheap laptop.
I've been tinkering with PCs / Laptops for years, but I'm at the opposite end of the scale, a rank amateur.
I was as concerned and upset by the concept of being blocked from installing Linux as anyone here : I've dual booted every new PC / Laptop I've bought in the last 5 or 6 years.

The way to install Xubuntu was to get into Win 10 PC Settings / Update and Recovery / Advanced Startup / Use a device, and boot a USB device (in this case a USB DVD).
These settings still exist, even in Build 9926, the latest I have downloaded. (Notifications / All Settings / Update and ... )
I don't know if this is the "shim" I've seen others here refer to, but it appears Grub takes over and is the first to boot. One of the options in it is to start the Windows boot loader.
So, even if it is mandatory, is it that big an issue? I understand many O/Ss don't have a PK, but someone has already suggested using something like a Redhat or Ubuntu kernel to get past secure boot.

Comment Re:Only for the first year (Score 1) 570

I think the point about "only the first year" can be related to two things Microsoft has done in the past:

1. A lot of netbooks were sold with "Windows 7 Starter" early in the life of Windows 7. You got limited functionality, no ability to download and all sorts of other PITA limitations. If you wanted to remove them, you paid for the "full version" of Win7 like any other "Any Time Upgrade". (My solution was to install OpenSUSE)

2. When Windows 8 first came out, I bought an upgrade disc for $58.00 or so. When I later bought a Windows 8.1 disc to install on a friends computer it was priced at $130.00.

Of course, I'm in Australia, YMMV.

I would imagine the "free upgrade" will be a download (difficult to impossible for many on limited connections) for the first year, after that you have to stump up for a disc from the shop, or buy an Activation Code to download.

Comment After the 150th time ... (Score 1) 251

I got one call telling me the woman on the phone was calling from Microsoft, and there was a problem with my computer ... and I was too tired/bored to bother, so announcted "I use Linux".

Her response was shocking: she apologised for wasting my time and hung up!

I was stunned to say the least.

Slashdot Top Deals

All life evolves by the differential survival of replicating entities. -- Dawkins

Working...